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UNIV OF MO COLLEGE PARK 



M I ! I II 1 1 II I M I 

1M30 DSSTn7b 7 



NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY. IN, 

GENERAL LIBRARY 
,0 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA. NEW YORK. M. Y 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/sponsor57sponno3 




THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE TV/RADIO ADVERTISERS USE 



*£n. 





JWBAV 



GREEN BAV 





M 



WHEN SHOULD 
YOU DROP A 
WEAK TV SHOW? 

Over next .'*(> da) - ad« 
men will begin to ! 
tlii- problem. Il< 
what l.i-i season's big 
turnovei teaches, along 
with analysis of when 
tin- hits were evident 

Page 33 



Daytime tv 
outpulls all media 
for moving firm 

Page 36 

What to watch for 
when buying 
"music-and-news' 

Page 38 

How to build 
a bigger 
audience 



GIVES PERSONAL SERVICE TO tke, LaxA o( fAiik & tto^ey ! P ag e42 



SMALL CITIES & BIG FARMS. ..360,000 FAMILIES 



ninth in a series of 12 ads based on the signs of the zodiac 






PROGRESSIVE 

...and 

twelve months 
out of every year 
stations 
under the sign 
of MEEKER 
benefit by: 

PROGRESSIVE planr 

for the long term . . . 
Realistic 
commission plan 
for stations; 
profit-sharing plan 
for staff. 

This insures 

cooperative selling, 

stability of personnel 

and equal sales 

effort 

per station. 




the meeker company, inc. 

radio and television station representatives 
new york Chicago san francisco los angeles Philadelphia 




Striking camera angles, dramatic close-ups and a new, liin- 
band version ol the Light-! p Time song add sparkle t<> the new 
T\ campaign For lucks Strike cigarettes - made bj The 
American Tobacco Company. Commercials all Feature the popu- 
lar Luck) Strike couple, Grace and Russ, in appealing, true-to- 
life smoking situations . . . and make this most inviting promise: 
"You'll sa) a Lucky's the best-tasting cigarette you ever smoked." 







Peelabanana, eatabanana, drinkabanana that's BananasL 
And it awards are an) indication, this campaign for I nited Fruit 
Company i- a bananasmash liit. As a consumer series, Banana- 
slang was honored 1>> Esquire magazine, and in lilcri:- 
Ige. Adapted for trade paper-. Bananaslang won a prize in t he 
Associated Business Publications contest. True i" the campaign 
theme, Banana readership bas been "w bolesome — and then some." 








STERL.MG SAtT 




biinfl 4 ° 



u , »h« b«" ,r 



Everyone talks about the weather— especiall) sail manu- 
facturers. In fact, the clai 1 sail pouring in damp weather 

bas bee an advertising cliche. So International ""all Com- 
pany i- taking a ii' u approach for it- Sterling Salt. Promoting 
sail a- an ex< iting ingredient in modem < •« ■< >k i 1 1 1^ . advertisemi 
in newspapers feature recipes made better with Sterling Salt 
Animated -alt shaker is used in print and at poinl ol sail . 




Champagne flight. I hi- summer, through a saturation radio 
campaign, Western Virlines told the \\ est about it- famous 
flights that feature champagne, filel mignon and orchids. 
BBDO Los bigeles promoted the superb hospitality of this 
airline in other media as well. Western, senioi I . S. airline. 
es twelve western states, neighboring Canada and Mexico 
(it\ . . and gives them America's smartest air -• n 



BATTEN, BARTON, DURSTINE & OSBORN, INC., ADVERTISING 



■OS h>n ■ IUFFALO 






HOt I \ WCMHf 



- 



SPONSOR 



SEPTEMBER I95't 



7 SEPTEMBER 1957 • Vol. 11, No. 36 



THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE Tv/RADIO ADVERTISERS USE 



DIGEST OF ARTICLES 

The vital 30 days 

33 The toughest programing decisions of the year face tv admen in the 
weeks ahead. lien'- what to do if your show looks like a winner or a 
flop, with cost estimates for a mid-stream switch. Separate report with 
this article charts rating histories of lx»th successful and flop shows of 1956 

Daytime tv outpulls all other media for Lyons 

36 California van line puts H.V , ( ,f regional budget into tv, shares in na- 
tional media with Eastern group. Tv aim: to reach both men and women 

Music-and-news are only building blocks 

38 Successful music-and-news stations are those who have achieved distinct 
personality, a fact still not fully understood hy buyers and seller- both 

How to promote a larger audience for your show 

42 You can build your program audience hy hitting hard with a coordinated 
promotion aimed in three directions: employees, consumer- and dealers 

Candid camera quotes on trade paper ads 

44 ''"" good are trade paper ads? \dvertiser and agency planners, judges 
in SPONSOR'S first annual awards competition, give critical comments 

The softy sell 

46 West Coast show now seeking syndication on live basis is aimed at pet 
lovers. Show format pre-selects market for pet foods and related items 



FEATURES 

86 'sponsor Backstage 

61 Film-Scope 

28 l"th and Madison 

55 New and Renew 

66 News & Idea Wrap-Up 

5 Newsmaker of the Week 

68 Picture Wrap-Up 

20 Reps at Work 

82 Sponsor Hears 



9 Sponsor-Scope 

90 Sponsor Speak- 

64 Spot Buys 

90 Ten Second Spots 

14 Timebuyers at Work 

22 Tv and Radio Newsmakers 

79 Washington Week 

26 Women's Week 



In Upcoming Issues 

Can tv pare its program costs? 

\- television matures there's growing interest in putting every tv dol- 
lar to work productiveh . Hence the interest in hidden waste items 
on network shows which sometimes equal the cost of a spot tv push 

Network radio's 1957 clients 

You II find them listed alphabetically in next week'- sponsor as part 
of the month!} Radio Basics section; plus a new feature a barometer 
ol how much time network radio has sold tin- month compared to last 



Editor and Publisher 

Norman R. Glenn 

Secretary-Treasurer 

Elaine Couper Glenn 

VP— Assistant Publisher 

Bernard Piatt 

General Manager 

Arch L. Madsen 

EDITORIAL DEPARTMENT 
Executive Editor 

Miles David 
News Editor 

Ben Bodec 
Senior Editors 

Alfred J. Jaffe 
Evelyn Konrad 
Jane Pinkerton 
W. F. Miksch 

Film Editor 

Barbara Wilkens 
Assistant Editors 

Joan W. Holland 
Jack Lindrup 
Lois Heywood 
Contributing Editors 

Bob Foreman 
Joe Csida 

Art Editor 

Phil Franznick 
Production Editor 

Erwin Ephron 

ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT 
New York Manager 

Charles W. Godwin 
Western Manager 
Edwin D. Cooper 
Southern Manager 
Herb Martin 
Midwest Manager 
Sam B. Schneider 
Mid-Atlantic Manager 
Donald C. Fuller 
Production Manager 
Jane E. Perry 

Administrative Staff 
M. Therese McHugh 
Dorris Bowers 
George Becker 

Circulation Department 
Seymour Weber 
Beryl Bynoe 
Emily Cutillo 

Accounting Department 

Laura Oken 
Laura Datre 
Readers' Service 

Marilyn Hammond 



Member of Business Publications 
Audit of Circulations Inc. 



SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. 

combined with TV. Executive, Editorial. Circu- 
lation and Advertising Offices: 40 E. 49th St. 
i49th & Madison* New York 17, N. Y. Tele- 
phone: MUrray Hill 8-2772. Chicago Office: 
612 N. Michigan Ave. Phone. Superior 7-9863. Los 
Angeles Office: 6087 Sunset Boulevard. Phone: 
Hollywood 4-8089. Printing Office: 3110 Elm 
Ave., Baltimore 11, Md. Subscriptions: United 
States $3 a year. Canada and foreign $4. Sin- 
gle copies 20c. Printed in U.S.A. Address all 
correspondence fo 40 E. 49th St., N. Y. 17, 
N. Y. MUrray Hill 8-2772. Published weekly by 
SPONSOR Publications Inc. Entered as 2nd class 
matter on 29 January 1948 at the Baltimore 
postoffice under the Act of 3 March 1879. 

Copyright 1957 

Sponsor Publications Inc. 




You 'Ring the Bell' with 

KTHV 



Channel 11 

LITTLE ROCK 

KTHV's 316.000 watts carry our programs to 
must of Arkansas. But maximum />"inr is onlj 
one of eight reasons why KTHV is your best 
television buy in this State! 

The other seven : 

1. Over 240,000 TV Homes 

2. CBS Affiliation 

3. ( bannel II 

4. Highest Antenna in Central South 
(1736' iihnii averagi terrain!) 

5. Center-of-State Location 

6. Superb Neu Studios 

7. Know-Hou Management 

Your Branham man has till the details. Ask him! 



® 316,000 Watts Channel ■ I ■ 
Henr\ Clav. Lxecutivt lict President ^^ T^ ^^ 

B. G. Robertson. General Manager ^^ ^^r 

AFFILIATED WITH KTHS, LITTLE ROCK, ARKANSAS DEMOCRAT, LITTLE ROCK, AND KWKH, SHREVEPORT 



SPONSOR • 7 SEPTEMBER 10'iT 



IN INLAND CALIFORNIA (and western nevadai 



"BEELINE.-"- 



del*A>e/i& *uo*e -fixb-fciie fetoueif 



■ 




This group of mountain-ringed 
radio stations, purchased as a unit, 
delivers more radio homes than any 
combination of competitive stations 
. . . at by far the lowest cost per thou- 
sand. (Nielsen and SR&D) 

They serve this amazingly rich 
inland market with an effective buy- 
ing income of more than $4.6 billion 
— more than Washington (D.C.) met- 
ropolitan market — and with a value 
of farm products sold greater than 
Minnesota. (Sales Management's 1957 
Copyrighted Survey) 



O RENO 
O SACRAMENTO 



/UcCfatciOf KFBK 



KBEEO MODESTO 
|5/U>aaCadtM<U} KMJ O FRESN0\ 



G&VAJpOJ*A\ 



Sacramento, California 

Paul H. Raymer Co., 

National Representative 



\ 

KERN ° BAKERSFIELD 




SPONSOR 



. SEPTEMBER 1957 



HVj 1 Jo. ' Li w JZ 

of the we 






/ /(«■ biggest agency merger <»/ //ie >«•>//- imu hiiiia analysed 
by admen Inst week. Robert H atson, chairman of the board 
of R&R, becomes boanl chairman of //ie merged thop$, 
Ruthrauff <V- Ryan and Erwin, asey. The merged agency, 
(bitting about $72 million), expects greater cost efficiency. 

The newsmaker: Bob Watson, former!) chairman oJ the 
board "I R&R and now chairman of the board "I ili>' merged R&R- 
Erwin, Wasej operation, was rxol onl) a kej figure in bringing about 
the merger, bul bad actual!} been shopping about foi likelj candi- 
date-agencies during tli<' pasl yeai oi two. 

\ couple of years ago the agenc) losl a wad "I billing and ran into 
difficulty. This is the kind of blow thai a in< reasinglj difficult for an 
agency, particularly a middle-sized 9hop, to withstand since operat- 
ing costs keep rising despite occasional reversals. 

To strengthen the agencj Bob 
Watson was reported to have been 
interested in mergers at various 
times with such agencies as Bryan 
Houston ami Brisacher, \\ heeler. 
I he latter appealed partlv because 
of its strength on the West (.nasi 
and a general complementing "I 
agenc) accounts, i Brisacher. 
\\ heeler actual!) became merged 
into Cunningham & Walsh earlier 
this \ear. I 

Erwin, W asej fills the bill on 
both those counts (non-competi- 
tive accounts and strength on the \\ est ( ioasl i : and there"- the added 
advantage that it is a larger operation. The merged agenc) will he 
known as Erwin, Wasey, Ruthrauff & Ryan, with R&R's Roswell 
Metzger acting as chairman of the executive committee. Erwin, 
Wasej s Howard Williams Is slated to be president. 

Plans for the newl\ merged firms' tv-radio department were not 
yet worked out at SPONSOR'S pre-- .lime. The two men current!) 

heading tv-radio for the separate -hop- are George Woll at l>v\K and 
Rok) Hunter at l.rw in, W asej . 

In agenc) circles the feeling is that this merger, while the largest 
of the year, i- not like!) to be the lasl to come about in the near 
future. Vgencj top management has felt continuously more aware 
of the pinch between rising costs of operating, shrinking profits and 
ever-increasing demand from client- for additional services. 

Boh Watson, whose own background is in creative areas and ac- 
count servicing, feels that marketing and television are essential to 
well-rounded agenc) service today. \nd he feels a lamer agenc) 
can render these services more effectively. 

Having joined R&R in the San Francisco office as an account exec- 
utive in 1940, Watson rose to manage that office, transferred to New 
York in 1 ( )4.'-? and became executive v.p. of R&R in 1952. Trior to 
being an agency man. he was a newspaper reporter. ^ 



SPONSOR • i SEPTEMBER lO.i, 




Rnlnrl II ,. 




35 YEARS OF 

SERVICE 

WMAZ -RADIO 




Another mainstay, bulwark, solid 
foundation, of WMAZ Radio's staff 
of personalities that keeps on keep- 
ing the good will and listener loy- 
alty all over Middle Georgia that 
we've built up over the pa t 35 
years of service. 

Bob is keeping up, too, with our 
record of 35 years of effective sell- 
ing in the Middle Georgia market. 
He's our "early morning man" . . . 
from 6 to 6:30 . . . and then he 
plays "Mama Music" from 9 till 
9:45. "Mama Music" heads straight 
to the lady of any age, who buys 
and buys, and listens to Bob as she 
makes out her list. 

Bob Spiller can sell for you. Give 
him a chance, and watch your sales 
figures rise in Middle Georgia. 

IO, OO© WATTS 

CBS 



WMAZ 

RADIO 



MACON, &A. 

National Rep: 
AVERY-KNODEL, INC. 



You have to ask i<> be remembered ! 
\nt just once a week or once a month but as many times per [prospect per week 
as \ou can afford. \ml lor low -cost, working frequency today, CBS Radio daytime drama 
is the place to be. Willi sponsorship oi five program units you e<m reach a listener 
over three times a week for y 6 of a penny, with solid commercial-minute impres- 
sions each time ... 20.7 million such impressions even week. \nd because nobod) 
limes in serial drama for "background," you reach listeners who are listening. 
They're the best *iW. THE CBS RAD | NETWORK 




KPRC 




Here's old-fashioned popularity in the new way to 

sell. The man-sized power gets clear through. The 
smooth operation performs without a hitch. Works 

fine but doesn't get in the way. The modern viewpoint 
produces flip-top sales everytime you use it. 



JACK HARRIS 
Via President and General Manager 



JACK McGREW 
Station Managt t 



EDWARD PETRY & CO. 

Salimi.i/ Rl p>t .< ntaf.t t I 



\!<>yt tignifit urn It nrul rmltn 

urns of the week with interpretation 
in depth f<>r busy read 



SPONSOR-SCOPE 



7 SEPTEMBER Even before the new network tv Kcunon i- under Way, Mine of 1 1 1 «* topflight 

Copyright 1957 , ... . . 

SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC aiiCHClCM ilfC lllaklllg elll |> llilt IT pie<l I Ct 10 IIS allOIlt what Will happen to price- ami 

policies by January. 

This forecasting is based on the expectation thai UN T\ — armed with tin- 
strongest program lineup ever — will drain off enough audiences throughout th<- 
w.-.-k to lower the rating levels of CBS and \T.< . 

Vrguing thai network tv heretofore has been pegged to an economy based on t}i<- domi- 
nance of two networks, these agencies predict that: 

• Advertisers will demand a revaluation of network practices and policies on th<- 
premise that they should be flexible to changing factors. 

• Challenge the constant rise in programing prices and the pressure exerted in 
thai direction In the three major talent agencies. 

In am event, a new watchfulness i* building up among agencies. \nd whether the cur- 
rent guesses are completely on the beam or not, pressure for still shorter commitments 
18 sure to huild up. 

Madison \\einie currently is bullish about general business and. particularly, 
the advertising outlook for the balance of 19.17. 

H'ONSOR-SCOl'K tlii— week took a sounding among knowledgeable top 
agement, and here is how it appraises the convng months: 

• Generally speaking, the level of the retailing business i- O.K. (and perhaps headed 
up a bit i . 

• Durable goods are meeting resistance, hut they will step up their ad budgets 
to fire consumer with interest in improved products and need for replacing the old. 

• Only soft spots will be in apparel and textiles, but these likewise will i< soil l<> 
increased national ad expenditures and more emphasi* on co-op advert itions, 
and incentive drives. 

• Air-media-wise, the picture is especially encouraging— but with this provis 
of the promotional selling will come on short notice. 

Saturation buys will be the vogue. Will advertiser- he able to count on availabilities? 
Agencies hint that reps and stations should be prepared for a fair number of emer- 
gencies. 

Revlon found out this week why there's been a sales bobble on Silken-Net. 

Nielsen, which had been commissioned to track down the cause, reported it was due to 
snags in distribution. 

Implied moral: Don't blame your advertising until you have cased your com- 
plete marketing setup. 

Put this down as another tv first: Two agency officials Terry dyne and George 

Haight of McCann-Erickson — are taking public billing as co-producers of a show. 

It's in connection with the one-shot celebrating Standard Oil of New Jersey's cele- 
bration of its 75th anniversary. Production credit likewise will be ^iven to Showcase 
Productions. Inc. 

Clyne's position is v.p. with administrative authority over tv-radio: Haights — who 
comes from legit and films — is v.p.-manager of tv and radio. 

SPONSOR • 7 SEPTEMBER 1957 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 



Tv will be doing its first big concerted public, relations job next week with 
TvB coordination. Expected audience: 60 million. 

The project will lake two tacks: 

(1) Educating the viewer on the business of tv. explaining how come this half- 
billion-dollars worth of programing is made available to liim free; and (2) showing the 
advertiser, especially small businessmen, how tv is the cheapest way to reach an audience. 

The story will be told through 60-20-10 second announcements, using slides and 
scripts furnished by TvB. 

Here's one of the rising business-getters in the agencv field that is creating attention: 
36-vear-old Peter G. Peterson, v. p. and manager of McCann-Erickson's Chicago 
division. 

TTis knack for hauling in a mixture of package goods accounts for an agency branch 
heretofore associated with oil and similar accounts has his Michigan Avenue neighbors 
talking. 

Peterson's latest catches: Turn's and Nature's Remedy ($4.5 million) and Helene 
Curtis' Sprav Net and Egs Shampoo ($3.5 million). 

Peterson's techninues mieht be described as capitalizing on the trends of the times. 
He approached the task of buildinjr the office with the conviction that today's agency must 
be comnletelv oriented to marketing. 

(See these SPONSOR articles on the agencv-marketin? theme: 3 August 1957, 1 Octo- 
ber 1956. 9 Tanuarv 1956. 26 December 1955, 12 December 1955. 28 November 1955.) 

NBC TV continues to nitch daytime ratings against CBS TV. 

These comparisons from the August Nielsen NTI are being cited: 

PERIOD NBC TV AVERAGE RATING CBS TV AVERAGE RATING 

11 a.m. to 1 p.m. 8.4 6.9 

2:30 to 5:30 p.m. 7.5 7.2 

Nielsen's August 1956 report had CBS TV with an 8.8 to 3.1 advantage over NBC for 
the 11-1 segment, and a 7.5 to a 6.4 edge over the competitor for the 2:30 to 5:30 stretch. 

CBS Radio this week chalked up about $4 million gross in renewals and new 
business. The bier item was Colgate's 52-week continuation of 20 weeklv 7 1/ i-minute day- 
time units. 

New business included Longine-Wittenauer, California Prune, Aero Mayflower 
Transit Co., and Puroil. 

Here's another sisn that network radio is stoking up its intramural competition: 

ABN this week announced that it had made an agreement with WSM. Nash- 
ville, effective 29 Tanuarv: whereupon NBC quickly countered with the state- 
ment that the station would still he an NBC primary. 

NBC also anproached this development with a wan- step: ABN will originate a daily 
hour show out of Nashville, using WSM talent. 

Observed NBC: "The same thing was offered to us by WSM but we couldn't fit it 
into our schedule." 

Now that the vacation and holidav season is out of the way. preliminary discussions 
for a new tv ASCAP contract should be resumed this month. 

The current contract with networks and stations expires 31 December 1957. 
A committee of broadcasters met with ASCAP in June for an exploratorv talk, and 
things were left this wav : ASCAP would be hearing in due time from the committee. 

10 SPONSOR • 7 SEPTEMBER 1957 



SPONSOR-SCOPE ronttmvd 



Look tor .1 liv< l\ controvert] when ihe revised Nielsen Radio Station Index 
makes its debnl this month. 

Foremosl in the protesting clan will !><• the reps whose lists are beavj with re- 
gional stations. In fact, Vdam Young's researchers-writers already are it work on a 
critique. 

Tlir arguments you'll heai against the revised rating system include th( 

• Because rating figures foi specific trading areas are eliminated (all tradii nr 
lumped into a Bingle rating figure), there is no waj for a buyer i«> determine bow effec- 
tive a utalion in in its main trading zone. 

• The Bystem doesn't provide the buyei with ilir precise information he should have i<> 
find tin- stations which predominate in trading areas also covered bj other 
stations. 

• In confining tlir reports to ratings <>f metro home counties and total homes delivered, 
the system strongly favors the powerhouse station and puts the smaller stations at 
a disadvantage. 

\RN announced ilii*- week that it has conic in the parting of the ways with Nielsen. 

Tlic network won 1 ! renew its contract for the 1957-58 \RI service because it dor- 
not "evaluate fully tin- audience reached by radio today.'* including the 50 million 
out-of-home radio sets. 

Do timebuycrs pay much attention to the programing profile of a station — or 
do they just stop at the ratings and the calculated rost-per-1000? 

SPONSOR examines and answers this query in an artiele on page 38. the firsl in 
a broad and penetrating serie- called Radio in Transition. 

The artiele also discussr< the misuse and misunderstanding of the term "music 
and news station." and how music and news serve merelv as the framework around 
which a station develops a body of programing. 



Because of the large (and increasing) number of auto radios, you'll be inter- 
ested in these figures processed hv Nielsen from its Jul\ 1957 National Radio Index: 



WEEKEND PERIOD 

Saturday 1-2 p.m. 

Sunday 

Saturday 

Sunday 

Sundav 



AUTO TUNE- IN 
I AVERAGE MINUTE) 



4,650,000 
1,270,000 
3,550,000 

5.600.000 
6.210.000 



1-2 p.m. 
7-8 p.m. 
4-5 p.m. 
7-8 p.m. 

Note: It is estimated there are 214 listeners per car on the average, during 
the weekend. Peak average for any one segment is over 3 listeners per car for early Sun- 
day evenings. Above figures are ha*ed on New York Daylight Saving Time. Estimated 
total auto radios as of July 1957: 38.500.000. 

New York isn't the only souree from which network radio business is rolling 
in. Activity also has been on the surge in Chirago. 

CBS' Central Division accounts for 30*^- of its billings, while NBC's Midwest «ales *taff 
is contributing elose to 25%. 

The radio networks' other rich vein i* Detroit it- share being ~ r 'r for hoth CRS 
and NRC. (Tn the case of CRS. that does not include the |5-miIlion Ford deal which came 
through JWT. New York.) 



As a goodwill gesture to its affiliates. NBC Radio is letting them sell local par- 
ticipations in half of the Army football broadcasts this fall. 



There will be 11 games in all. 



SPONSOR • 7 SEPTEMBER 1957 



11 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 



Judging from the araounl of listening that stations have been doing lately to reps' 
"stories." you can expect an unusual number of changes in station representation 
iu coming months. 

The restlessness within station management seems to he related more to radio than 
lv. Dissatisfaction, as gatherer! by SPONSOR-SCOPE this week in talks with station op- 
erators, stems primarily from: 

• The failure of some reps to realize that there's been a change in the philosophy 
of selling radio and to gear their thinking accordingly. 

• Hesitation in advising station management to update rate cards, evolve competitive 
packages, and improve programing and promotion. 

The 60-day confirmation policy in radio soon may be as meaningless as the 
30-day starting date in spot tv. 

Several reps this week told SPONSOR-SCOPE that they recently have received quite ;i 
number of inquiries from agencies on availabilities for campaigns that won't start 
until January. 

The inquiring agencies explained that clients want this information before accepting a 
1058 media plan with a sizeable budget for radio. 

The consensus among these reps is that their stations will be inclined to go along 
with the advertisers. 

As one of the reps put it: "CBS took the Ford order on more than 00 days notice, and 
NBC Radio is quite lenient about the 60-dav policy. If the time is there and the order 
attractive, why should spot act differently?" 

Look for NBC Radio to come up soon with a new concept in program mer- 
chandising. 

It will be described as a plan which "crosses the best elements of participation 
with program ownership." 

The idea boils down to this: An advertiser who buys a daily fixed position on a 
dramatic series — such as Dr. Gentry — will have something concrete that he can merchan- 
dise to the trade. 

NBC's fixed-location plan runs counter to CBS Radio's checkerboard ap- 
proach: Spread vour participations over several programs, and you will be talking to more 
people with the most economical cost-per-thousand. 

R. J. Reynolds soon will be firing another heavy radio spot barrage via Esty 

(over and bevond the present spot placements for Cavalier^. 

Despite its critical probing of announcement scheduling. Esty is counted as one of 
the most radio-oriented agencies in the business today. Its billings in that medium 
are well over the $15-million mark. 

CBS Radio is offering a weekly taped half-hour of Bing Crosby, back-to-back 
with Jack Benny, for $10,100 gross, time and talent. 

That's $2,000 less than Home Insurance's bill for Benny. 

However. Home Insurance has Bennv all to itself, while Crosbv already is committed 
for a dailv strip to Ford. 

The network meantime has its fingers crossed on the return of still another single- 
sponsor show — the Telephone Hour. 

This is why NBC's Joe Cullisran is convinced that network radio is firmlv entrenched 
again as a topgrade medium: The four leading categories of advertising — drugs, 
cigarettes, groceries, and automotives — now account for 85% of NBC Radio's 
billings. "You couldn't hope for better bellwethers." says Culligan. 

Tor other news coverage in this issue, see Newsmaker of the Week, page 5: 
Filmscope. page 61; Spot Buys, page 64: News and Idea Wrap-Up. page 66: Washington 
Week, page 70: SPONSOR Hears, page 82; and Tv and Radio Newsmakers, page 88. 

12 SPONSOR • 7 SEPTEMBER 1057 






A time Buyer 

is fortified 

against 

distraction in 

Miami. 

One station (WQAM) has 
42.1 ° ' of the radio audience 



IheecnniiiKol fall si, st« the ti ,,,.,, „.., be far off wl 

'"' '" M,ami [n I — 1, !•' Then you can hear foi 

Ul " ' ' Il ^""'»< whj WQAM has made a dramatic p\„, 

the atari of Storz Station programming nearly a 
Coming via a time-buj Hooper says it dearly; WQAM ha 

,lliin •''-■ t,mea ' Mime audience of the nexl station Latest 

|,|,K "' ' nu area l '" 1 - and Trendex show WQAM on top 

I*"" i lei those old, outdated 
figures divert you. Talk to Blair 

WQAM 

erving all of Southern Floi 



Jack Sandlei 

I tooper, 7 a 
Saturday . Juh Augusl 1957 



ooper, 7 am,6 p.m., Monday- Edto #? .fa* 1 '" : " k " ' 

MIAMI 




TODAY'S RADIO FOR TODAY'S SELLIN 



SPONSOR • 7 SEPTEMBER 1957 



WD6Y Minneapolis St. Paul 
WHB Kansas City 
WQAM Miami 

REPRESENTED BY JOHN BLAIR A CO. 



TODD STORZ, PRESIDENT 



WTIX New Orleans 

REPRESENTED BY ADAM YOUNG INC. 



13 



Timebuye 
at work 



TWO MONTHS 



IN A ROW GIVE 



TOP RATING TO 



KONO RADIO 



IN SAN ANTONIO 

GET THE FACTS! Get facts 
and figures of an August sur- 
vey — KONO leads ALL San 
Antonio radio stations by a 
wide, wide margin. Buy now 
— rates go up October 1st. 
Get the details from your H-R 
Representative or Clarke 
Brown Man. 

860 kc 5000 watts • 

E3 E3 

SAN ANTONIO •* RCJCffO 



1 I 




Frank D. Sweeney, Lambert i, Feaslex. Inc.. New York, timebuyer 
for Phillips Petroleum and Warner-Lambert, says: "The ideal situa- 
tion for a timebuyer would be to have first-hand information by 
personalis visiting each station under consideration. This is of 
course impossible in most cases for obvious reasons. But we do 
feel that when the station manager 
visits a buyer he helps bridge the 
gap between station and buyer. 
This isn't to minimize all the im- 
portant information the rep pro- 
vides. We simply like to discuss 
with the station manager the latest 
developments on the local scene 
and the station's viewpoint on all 
phases of the industry. In many 
instances, an unknown or over- 
looked station or market may be 
brought to light by these meetings. 
In addition, tapes and kinescopes of local programs and personalities 
help bring the buyer closer to the local market. These enable him 
to buy subjectively as well as objectively — using his own judgment 
as well as numbers to select the best show for his client. The over- 
all result of these practices would be a station-agency relationship 
that serves the client better and aids station sales and programing." 



Mildred Fluent, account executive, Hixson & Jorgensen, Los An- 
geles, sa\s: "When I submit media recommendations to clients 
radio and television are included in the advertising schedule when- 
ever feasible. NaturalK the character of the product determines this, 
rime and again. I've seen the broadcast media shoot the sale 

of a product sky high. Radio and 
tv reach everyone with their sales 
messages — men, women and chil- 
dren. The people who don't \ iew 
or listen to either, or both, are as 
scarce as the proverbial hen's 
teeth. So the advertising agencj s 
problem is generall) not 'will ra- 
dio or t\ do the job' but rather 
"what should the commercial say, 
and how can the product best be 
merchandized?' M\ experience 
has been that the type of merchan- 
dising offered by stations to radio and tv advertisers is often as 
effective as the advertising itself. Where broadcast leaves off. mer- 
chandising takes over. The store displa\. for example, is the final 
reminder to the customer to buv the product. In a way, it's a silent 
salesman — in the case of super-markets, the onl\ one selling the item. 
Agencies certain!) should take full advantage of this cooperation." 




SPONSOR 



7 SEPTEMBER 1957 



From 6 AM 
to Noon 
in the 
Nation's Capital . 




WRC IS THE SPEAKER OF THE HOUSE! 



WRC brightens the mornings of more listeners 
than any other Washington radio station. Dur- 
ing the period from 6 AM right up until Noon, 
WRC averages a 22 ^ share of the total radio 
audience . . . which amounts to a convincing 
10 c c advantage over the second station! 

Al Ross' "Timekeeper" program starts it all off 
wjth three hours of entertainment that attracts 
and holds homemakers and husbands getting set 
to work and to buy. Gene Archer follows with 
his "Date in Washington," which wins a wide. 



loyal following throughout the Capital area. 
WRC's local hits are followed by network favor- 
ites such as the "NBC Bandstand" show, for a 
fully balanced morning schedule. 

In Washington's 17-radio-station market, WRC's 
big advantage will prove to be to your advantage, 
too. Let WRC Radio speak for you in the nation's 
booming Capital! 



WRO980 



WASHINGTON. D.C. SOLD BYInBCIsPOT SALES 
Source: XSI Report. Total Station A*die*ce-Wa,'>it*itor. DC. Area-May. HS7 



ALL ABOARD • • • *» TVs «« > 




iaa^!'"' : * .-V* jA* iS* 





,^vv' : . 



i^or Information 
and Screening 

WRITE! WIRE! CALL: 



Iinensioii in syndicated first-run A / 2 hour adventures! 



b GEMS 




Starring ALAN HALE 
as CASEY 



BOBBY CLARK 
OS CASEY, JR. 



. . . with a top supporting cast 
including the "CANNONBALL EXPRESS!" 









PRE 


Hold 1 




IN THESE 


TOP TV MARKETS! 




KOAT-TV 


Albuquerque,N.M. 




KGNC-TV 


AmarUlo, Texas 




KERO-TV 


Bakers field, Cal. 




WAAM-TV 


Baltimore, M<l. 




WAFB-TV 


Baton Rouge, La. 




KBOI-TV 


Boise, Ida hi, 




WBZ-TV 


Boston, Mass. 




WGN-TV 


Chicago, III. 




KYW-TV 


Cleveland, Ohio 




WWJ-TV 


Detroit. Mich. 




KJEO-TV 


Fresno, Cal. 




KLAS-TV 


Las Vegas, A ■ 




KTTV-TV 


Las Ac ai ■ < al. 




WPIX-TV 


M w York, S. Y. 




WPFH-TV 


Pi ila.-Wilmington 




KPHO-TV 


Phoenix, Ariz. 




KDKA-TV 


Pittsburgh, I 'a. 




KGW-TV 


Portland. Or. 




KVIP-TV 


Redding. Cal. 




KCRA-TV 


Sacramento, ( 'al. 




KTNT-TV 


Tacoma. Wash. 




KVOA-TV 


Tucson, Ariz. 




WTOP-TV 


Washington, D. C. 








SCREEN ^ GEMS, INC 

TELEVISION SUBSIDIARY OF COLUMBIA PICTURES CORP. 
711 FIFTH AVENUE, NEW YORK, N. Y. 



NEW YORK DETROIT CHICAGO HOLLYWOOD 

711 Fifth Ave. 709 Fox Bldg. 230 N. Michigan Ave. 1334 N. Beechwood Dr. 
Plaio 1-4432 Woodward 1-3979 Franklyn 2-3696 H.-»llvw>wl O.-ni 1 



NEW ORLEANS 
1032 Royal St. 



TORONTO 

102-108 Peter St. 



t 



There's more to Florida! 



Geography has been good to the state, endowing it with 
a climate ideal for year-round swimming. Geography Ims 
also had great influence on the key city of Jacksonville, 

so situated that it is the distribution center for a east 
territory extending well beyond Florida's borders. 

There's Georgia, for instance 

. . . much of which looks to Jacksonville for its victuals . . . 
and for its viewing. WMBR-T.V's 67-county SCS area 

extends deep into Georgia, encompassing an area which 
accounts for 18.1% of food sales for the entire state. 
Plus 28.0' "c of Florida's total food sales to hoot! In sum. 
II MUR-ll delivers an area that accounts for 23.8% of 
total food sales for Florida and G eorgia combined .' 

and WMBRTV, Jacksonville 

commands the long-established loyally of the 300,000 
television families in this 67-county area. Throughout the 
"outside" area, VCS shows WMBR-TVan eleven-to-one 
favorite over its competition.- Ind within the Jacksonville 
metropolitan area, the latest ARB proved U MHR-'f I was 
the five-to-one favorite. If you have a product sold in food 
stores, sell it to almost one -fourth of Florida and Georgia 
combined, on . . . Channel I, Jacksonville— W ▼Il>lv I \ 
Operated by the Washington Post Broafka?-t Division 
Represented by CBS Television Spol Sales 






Reps at work 



'ds-r 



o 



EDDY BAKERIES, sponsor of 
THE CISCO KID in nine North- 
western markets, report thru 
Givens-Davies Advertising 
Agency: 

' ^The Cisco Kid' is do- 
ing a tremendous job for 
EDDY BAKERIES. Sales in all 
areashave shown a marked 
increase in spite of heavy 
competition . These in- 
creases can be attributed 
directly to the show. Bak- 
ery executives express keen 
satisfaction with the pow- 
erful sales punch packed 
by The Cisco Kid'/' 

Ask »o see more success stories of 

THE WOWS GREATEST SALESMAN! 

"THE CISCO KID" 



£%/&&&&?& 



20 




Marshall H. Karp, Adam \ oung, New York, feels that "certain 
practices could be observed in the broadcast and advertising in- 
dustries to facilitate more efficient bin ing and selling of spot. These 
would include: (ll the salesman should select only those availabil- 
ities that would coincide with the timebuyer's required audience, 
desired frequency, length of cop\ 
and the limitations of his budget. 
I 2 I The salesman should be sure 
to include all the information 
that's new and of special interest 
to the timebuver. (3) The sales- 
man should submit it promptly. 
In turn. I 1 I the timebuyer should 
realize the salesman's obligation 
to continually put his best foot 
forward in terms of available 
time. ( 2 1 After the initial buy, 
the timebuyer should call in the 

salesmen who were involved, tell them the exact schedule purchased, 
and let them fight it out, to secure an even stronger schedule. This 
gives the salesman the chance to judge his avails against those spe- 
cifically submitted by the competition. It also, if the competition 
is extensive enough, gives the stations an insight into how they 
stack up with competitors. I ltimately. the advertiser gains." 



Gerry Mulderrig, Vernard. Rintoul & McConnell. New York, says 
that his experience both as a rep salesman and former timebuyer for 
one of the largest agencies has been that agencies rely too heavily 
on ratings in buying. "So I'm glad to see.'" Gerry says, ""that ad- 
vertisers are getting solid results using nighttime and Saturday radio. 

Previouslv. these advertisers con- 
fined their advertising to the 7:00 
to 9:00 a.m. and the 4:00 to 7:00 
p.m. segments. Now they've ex- 
panded their schedules to reach 
the millions who listen to radio 
during these non-prime periods. 
They've discovered, in particular, 
that these times are especially 
valuable in creating impulse buv- 
ing because of car listeners." 
Jerry points out that super mar- 
kets throughout the country, for 
example, now stav open until 9:00 p.m. three and four nights a week 
because they find substantial numbers of people like to shop in the 
evening. Saturday, of course, is a peak shopping day. "So both 
nighttime and Saturday spot advertising."' Gerry says, "reach these 
people as they drive — reminding them to pick up cigarettes or soap 
or cereal. The number of products bought by impulse is limitless.*" 




SPONSOR 



7 SEPTEMBER 1957 




-*»v 



i : * 



% 



"YOUNG MAN, 
WHAT HAVE 



YOU DONE 



WITH MY 



OAP OPERAS?" 



if 



We're sorry, ma'am. You've been a faithful listener for years. But there just wasn't any 
room for them in our plans for the future. At American Radio we're programing for 
today's new audience— the on-the-go housewife who's busier than ever, and who has 
formed new listening habits. So out go soap operas. 

"What's taking their place?" you ask. Live music, that's what— and here's why: 

1. Soap operas have dropped 37°o in share o' r£dio audience. 

2. 60°o of today's housewives listen to muse, while only 34.8°o listen to soap operas. 

3. Night TV satisfies the demand for drama. 

That's why at American Radio we're programing live radio exclusively. That's why we're 
sold on the new live Herb Oscar Anderson Show. 10-11 every weekday. It's live, top tune 
music . . . live singers . . . live orchestra. It's fun radio, and it's what today's young 
housewife wants. 

*A. C. Nielson 
* *RAB Survey of Radio and Housewives, March 1957 
***Pure logic 



the lifer® one is 




ERICAN 
BROADCASTING 
NETWORK 




of Portland and 30 
surrounding Oregon- 
Washington counties In 
the palm of her lovely 
hand. Her station is 
KOIN-TV. The way she re- 
acts to buying suggestions 
is absolutely charming. 
You'll discover how charm- 
ing when you learn KOIN-TV's 
enviable ratings from the 
gentlemen at CBS Spot Sales. 



22 




Tv and radio 



EWSMAKERS 



Albin F. Yagley has been appointed me- 
dia director for the Detroit office of Grant 
Advertising. L. R. Mcintosh, executive 
\ ice president and manager of Grant- 
Detroit, announced that Yagley will direct 
and coordinate all media activities for ac- 
counts handled 1>\ the Grant-Detroit office. 
Before coming to Grant. Yaglev was em- 
ployed 1>\ YlacManus, John & Adams, Inc., 
of Detroit for 17 \ears. At this agency, he became a space buver in 
1946 and rose to the position of assistant media director in 1951. 
Yagley began his advertising career in the co-op advertising depart- 
ment of the Pontiac division of the General Motors Corp. Yaglev is 
a native Detroiter who has studied the midwestern markets. He 
knows each markets peculiarities and the strategy of selling it. A 
World War II veteran, he is 39 and the father of two children. 

Cunnar 0. Wiig has been made general 
manager of WROC-TY, Rochester. Wiig, 
former general manager of WHEC. WHEC- 
TV and managing director of the Gannett 
radio group, came to Rochester from Pitts- 
burgh, where he resigned as executive vice 
president and director of Allegheny Broad- 
casting Corp. (KQV, CBS radio) and 
Television City. Inc.. following their merg- 
er with the Hearst interest. In broadcasting 30 years, he spent the 
first 26 in Rochester. His voice is a familiar favorite in that city, 
where he is remembered as the originator of recreated play-by-play 
baseball broadcasting. W iig has been honored by the International 
League for this contribution and cited as "Rochester's all-time sports 
announcer." Born in Olso. Norway, he attended Mt. Herman prep 
school and is a graduate of the Rochester Institute of Technology. 

Richard C. Dudley, who has been assistant 
general manager for the past three years, 
has been named general manager of \\ SAL 
and WSAU-TV i Wassau Wisconsin). He 
succeeds George T. Frenchette, elected 
president of the Wisconsin ^ alley Tele- 
vision Corp.. operators of the stations. 
J. C. Sturtevant assumes the chairmanship 
of the board of the corporation. All three 
are broadcast veterans interested in developing new approaches in tv 
programing. Among future plans of the Wisconsin \ allej Television 
Corp. is construction of a new antenna for W SAL -T\ . which is 
Channel 7, on Rib Mountain, the highest natural elevation in the 
state of Wisconsin. It will boost the t\ stations power to 316,000 
watts. Construction will start immediately upon FCC approval. In 
the meantime, Dudley. Frenchette and Sturtevant are working out 
plans in programing in keeping with the stations future coverage. 





SPONSOR 



7 SEPTEMBER 1957 




I 



in Kansas City 



if you want 
"colorful" news 
there's a place to go 




if you want award- 
winning reporting 

it's KCMORadio 



*The only radio station to win both 
Sigma Delta Chi Award and 
Distinguished Achievement Award of 
National Association of Radio 
News Directors. 

ANOTHER 



KCMO- Radio 
WHEN -Radio 
KPHO-Radio 
WOW-Radio 



Kansas City 
Syracuse 
Phoenix 
Omaha 



810 CBS 
620 CBS 
910 ABC 
590 CBS 




Basic CBS— 50.000 Watts 
Joe Hartenbower, Gen Mgr. 
R. W. Evans, Commercial Mgr. 
Represented nationally by Katz Agency 

KCMO ... One of Meredith's 
Big 4 . . . All-Family Stations. 



® 



Meredith Stations Are Affiliated with Better Homes and Gardens and Successful Farming Magazines 



SPONSOR • , SEPTEMBER 1957 



23 










« *. *• • 



II •: 




bridge is the fastesl waj to cross a river. When you take it you buj time. 





Agencies and advertisers buj tune tor the same reason to get where 

thej want to go— faster. Advertisers in SPONSOR buj 

space to sell their time taster because SPONSOR is their bridge — 

the quickest waj to reach the advertiser-agenc) team that buys the time 

At the prestige price of $10 a year SPONSOR delivered more of these decision making teams 

than any other publication in the broadcast field. But one ol the 

unhappy practices that must be faced b\ all trade journals is 

the "routing list". Main men receive their "routed cop\" as much as 5 weeks 

after the issue has left the press. In our opinion a good trade journal is the bread 

and butter thinking of the very top minds in the industry. If it 

is worth reading at all — it is to the best interests of every 

practitioner to receive his copy promptly and to gi\e it his most serious 

consideration — AT HOME. 

SPONSOR — since its inception has been the most respected and the 

most widel) quoted publication in its field. It has continuous]} offered its readers 

more with ever} passing issue. Consistently a pioneer, it has 

decided — in an historic move — to pioneer in the "routing 

practice" as well. That's win SPONSOR has 

reduced its rates from $10 to $3 a year. 

We believe that at this figure most everyone now on a routing list and 
thousands of potential new advertiser-agenc) teams will become members of the 
ever growing family of SPONSOR READERS— Al HOME, 
and that it will be to the ultimate benefit of everyone involved. 

e in >.i^t piM p 



THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE TV/RADIO ADVERTISERS USE 



Westerners listen 
to their favorite" 
programs on 
the CBS Radio 
Pacific Network" 



1 Listen: This refers to "ears in use," 
not merely to "sets in use." 

2 Favorite: As in Harry Babbitt, Sun- 
day News Desk, Dave Vaile News, 
Ruth Ashton, Frank Goss News and 
Tom Harmon — to name just a few 
great CBS'rs. 

3 Network: 245,000 watts to blanket 
the 3 Pacific Coast States. 

Summary: Programs, Personalities 
and Power . . . that's why your mes- 
sage belongs on the CBS Radio 
Pacific Network. 




REPRESENTED BY CBS RADIO SPOT SALES 




l\'ews and views for women in 
advertising and wives of admen 



Women's week 



How to be a producer: Lady tv packager and public relations 
consultant Joan Sinclaire is offering a course to women in the New 
\ ork metropolitan area. Subject: producing panel shows, conduct- 
ing interviews, writing and announcing commercials. The course 
starts 23 September, Mondays 8:00-9:50 p.m. at the Ballard School 
of the YWCA, Lexington Avenue and 53rd Street, will include such 
guest speakers as Paul Belanger (BBDOl. Jay Kacin (McCann- 
Ericksonl. Norman Baer I Lewin, Williams and Savior I, Joseph 
Kenas (Academy Award winning film writer I among others. 

Joan's own background includes producing Leave It to the Girls, 
Meet the Press, The Lisa Ferraday Show. 

Ideal agency job for women: As agencies have been getting more 
and more intimately involved in product testing, test kitchens have 
become an increasingly vital part of the agency operation. The gal 
who runs such a test kitchen gets paid to keep up on development of 
new recipes, trying out new and attractive ways to serve and prepare 
foods, as well as creation of housekeeping tips on washing laundry 
efficiently, making fabrics last longer. 

Grace Teed, who'd been assistant director of home service for the 
Whirlpool Corp. in St. Joseph, Mich., has just been appointed a 
Leo Burnett Co. home economist and will head up the Chicago 
agency's test kitchen. Because of this background she'll also serve 
as home economics advisor on all food and appliance accounts. 

Before getting her practical experience in industry, Grace received 
a B.S. degree in foods and nutrition from Michigan State College. 

Slenderella's a woman's world: It's long been well known that 
women tend to be more interested in spot reducing than men even 
though the need may be equally spread between the two sexes. Slen- 
derella. is the chain of slenderizing salons which has capitalized 
both on women's figure-consciousness and their loyalty to radio 
(Slenderella International grew to its present giant size through 
radio advertising I . 

One interesting aspect of the operation is the fact that only 25" - 
of the firm's 1,750 employees are men. and that women are among 
the best-paid top executives in the world-wide network of salons. 

In fact. Larry Mack, president of Slenderella. is proud of his 
firm's hiring practices. ''It's a woman's world." sa\s he. "And we 
admit it." 

Women in radio: Family-owned and operated radio Nation 
K-ACK. Riverside, Cal., has just added another page to its women's 
schedule 1>\ programing Woman's World, an "off-beat program 
created by Helen Sherban. women's commentator." 

K- \CE is proof that women can work together well and effective- 
ly: Helen Sherban. wife of owner-general manager Ray Lapica. re- 
ports to her sister Ollie Sherban. women's editor of the station, 
i Both Rav and Ollie are sponsor alumni, i 



26 



spov-ok 



SEPTEMBER 1057 



5 fimebuyer$-5 reasons for 
buying WKY, Oklahoma City! 



Total coverage sold me! 
NCS *2 gives WKY 56 Oklahoma 
counties — 1 8 more than the 2nd 

station! Coverage area contains 
\ 68% of Oklahoma's population, _•' 
retail sales! 



Nielsen proves WKY's 
unduplicated weekly coverage 
is greater than the next 
4 stations combined! 



Reputation means a lot 
to me . . . and WKY has been 
one of America's great pioneer 
stations since 1 920! 



Cost-per-thousand 

clinched it for me! Top 
audience, top coverage make 
WKY best buy! 



Pulse showed me WKY is 
clearly dominant morning . . . 
noon . . . night! Audience 6 a.m. to 
midnight averaged 40% 
greater than 2nd station! 




However you buy 




"And you'll like the way the Katx people come up 
with accurate, useful information and prime avoil- 
abilities when you wo r t them." 

mm 

930 kc NBC 
OKLAHOMA CITY 

The WKY Television System, Inc. 



SPONSOR • 7 SEPTEMBER 1957 



27 




Handy Bookmark Series 






fcTfl 



s eC eS 



Vvsets 



\han 






"•^'^P 

•a--^**^ 



O *\v\ov»s. ° oe -■ 
Gets !«; bu \ not w 






es 



d\tfet« 



evt\se^ 

sa\cs 

a \\eao 



a cM 



ea< 



e a 0V|c .V-c oowv 



W and -aw**. 

Soto** 10 ° 



nance 
.tait \« 



to 

Vh'vs 



and, 



d*« 



ence 



Keep your place 
in Los Angeles 
with KTTV 



Tim* 5 ' 



tos 






N.GK 



»l>" 



.-TV 



esented 



itiono 



B.P° rt 



%S>^ 



28 




49th anil 
Madison 



Timebuying and Research 
V' e have read with great interest your 
praise-worth) and timel) article. "Reps 
rate the timebuyers," in the August 
24th issue. 

\\ e feel that one of the important 
points mentioned in the article was the 
reference to the vital role of research 
in timebuying. We. of BBDO Re- 
search. ha\e had very extensive contact 
with station representatives and since 
this is undoubtedly true with main 
other agencies, we feel it will he verj 
interesting to see how the reps rate the 
agencies in terms of research as well as 
in terms of timebuying. Our thinking 
is that this is almost mandatorv since 
one does not function successfullv 
without the other. 

Mart] Herhst. acting manager, 
Radio/Tv Research Dept. 
BBDO. New York 

Timebuyers of the U. S. addendum 
We have just read your 24 August 
issue of sponsor. On page 80. under 
the heading of Oklahoma timebuyers, 
we note that this agency was not listed. 
Did we fail to send information re- 
quested by your publication? 

Of course, since this agency is onl\ 
two years old. your staff may not have 
known that we existed, although we 
are listed in the Agency List. 

We're not complaining — just wanted 
you to know we're here, we've come a 
long way. we are gearing to go even 
farther! 

Norman F. Hall. 

Hall & Thompson. Inc., 

Oklahoma City. Okla. 

• Agencies *ith clients active in the air media 
on a national or regional basis \«ho are not in- 
cluded in the Timebuyers of the I*. S. listing and 
wish to hi- should address pertinent information 
to SPONSOR. 1(1 E. 19th St.. New York 17. N. V. 
An addendum listing will be published for these 
agencies and the> will be included in the reprint 
if possible. 

Radio's fabulous comeback 
What with this, that and the other, in- 
cluding a vacation. I have just gotten 
around to reading the 13 July issue of 
sponsor. I'm glad I'm the meticulous 
kind that reads magazines in sequence 
no matter how old they are or I would 
have missed Joe Csida s column. "Be- 



SPONSOR 



7 SEPTEMBER 1957 



Dual Control 

in the 

Twin Cities 

WDGY confrols the =1 spot. 

Advertisers control 

consumer purchases 

with buys on: 

WDGY 

50.000 Watts 
Minneapolis-St. Paul 



W DGY s firsl place Hooper goes onward and upwi 

\mu \V|m;Y controls :;i r, of thi daytime audience, 7 a in 6 ; 

Mondaj through Saturday. Jul August Hoopi 

Latesl Trendex agrees WDGY has 29.991 average share of audi 
7 .Mil 6 pin. Monday through Saturday. 

Latesl Pulse contii s the unanimity WDGY has 189 firsl | >l;i.->- 

quarter hours againsl 128 for the nexl station. 

An. I it's nol jus! ,i listening habil "i .i generation which Storz 
Station programming has overturned. Time-buying habits i 

! Tgone a tremendous -> w i t ■ ■ 1 1 to WDGY. It' you want to I 

everything under control in the Twin Cities, talk to Blair 
\V DGY < leneral Manager -lark Tha 1 




rioisj 

ODAY'S RADIO FOR TODAY'S SELLING 



WDGY Minneapolis St. Paul 
WHB Kansas City 
WQAM Miami 

REPRESENTED BY JOHN BLAIR & CO. 



TODD STORZ, PRESIDENT 



WTIX New Orleans 

REPRESENTED BV ADAM YOUNG INC. 



SPONSOR • | SEPTEMBER 195, 



2<> 




WMAR-TV 

Maryland's Pioneer 
Television Station 

now celebrating its 

10th Year 
of Leadership 

IN BALTIMORE'S 

3-STATI0N MARKET 

WMAR-TV CHANNEL 2 

Share of sets in use .. 44.9 

Percentage of total 
quarter-hour firsts 55.2 

based on ARB Report for July, 1957 
(one week, sign on to midnight) 




WMAR-TV 

lllfe§I#tj 

CHANNEL 



SUNPAPERS TELEVISION, BALTIMORE, MD. 

TELEVISION AFFILIATE OF THE 

COLUMBIA BROADCASTING SYSTEM 

Represented by THE KATZ AGENCY, Inc. 

New York, Detroit, St. loois. Son Francisco, 

Chicago, Atlanta, Dallas, los Angeles 



49TH & MADISON continued . . . 

hind Radios Fabulous Comeback." 

Let me congratulate \ou on placing 
praise where it is due. As one who 
also works in Memphis radio vine- 
yard, I have nothing but admiration 
for the job that Harold Krelstein and 
his associates have done in regenerat- 
ing WMFS. It is a remarkable achieve- 
ment resulting from hard work, guts 
and imagination— above all, imagina- 
tion. And you are so right that the 
radio broadcasting industry can in 
large measure thank people like Harold 
Krelstein for its resurgence 

In that we are agreed so I hope you 
will credit me with wanting to take 
nothing away from him or WMPS in 
what I am about to say. And. that is 
that there is another factor which has 
had much to do with revitalizing radio 
— the birth and astounding growth of 
radio stations like WDIA that program 
exclusively to the Negro audience. 

This exclusive Negro programing is 
the epitome of specialized broadcasting 
and its success is also the result of the 
guts and imagination that it took to 
burrow back down in the wornout gold 
mine of radio and find the new and 
rich vein of the untouched, overlooked, 
neglected listeners, who are also the 
new golden frontier for the sale of 
every kind of consumer product . . . 
Harold F. Walker, commercial 
manager, WDIA, Memphis 

• SPONSOR - - annual Ne S ro Kadi., section will 
appear 28 September with detailed information 
on this yrowinj: market and the stations program- 
ing to it. 

Radio Basics 

You have again done a masterful job 
in production of Tv/Radio Basics. I 
believe this one is more complete and 
will be more useful than ever before. 
This is a genuine service to the broad- 
cast industry. 

We would again like to have a sup- 
ply of Radio Basics alone just as soon 
as they are available. 

R. M. Brown, general manager 

KPOJ, Portland 

Please accept this as our request for 
a supply of new RADIO BASICS— 
Section Seven. 

We will need 100 reprints. We've 
seen them, and we like them. 

Jack Starr, sales service. 

WHBQ-Radio, Memphis 

• Reprints ol Radio Basics are available. The 
price Is ■'*•"><• per reprin] with quantity prices avail- 
able mi request. Film Basics and I * Baalcs are 
also available in reprint form. Iddress request - 
to: SPONSOR Services, Inc., Ml E. 19th St.. New 

i..rk 17. IH.Y. 




WDSM-W 



NBC* ABC Channel 6 

D ITLUTH- SUPERIOR 

National Representatives 
PETERS, GRIFFIN, WOODWARD 



30 



SPONSOR 



SEPTEMBER 1957 



Omaha's Number 1 
Fulltime Independent 
Station 




w^ 







MyMommie 
Listens to 

KOIL' 




"OwoMiu KOIL" 



The Station Most Omaha-CounaV B/uffs Mommies Listen To! 

Avery-Knodel Rep. 



SPONSOR • 7 SEPTEMBER 1957 



31 



WERE MINUTES COUNT ! 




KARTOON 
| KARNIVAL 
8:30-9:00 a.m. 
Mon. • Fri. 



* Leading daytime kids' show 
from sign-on to 5:00 p.m. 




MATINEE 
MOVIE 





MY 

LITTLE 

MARGIE 

12 noon -12:30 

Mon. - Fri. 



* Strongest afternoon movies 
from 4:00-5:30 p.m., Mon. - Fri. 



->:-x<-: 




* Leading daytime syndicated show. 



Ask your H-R man 
about minute participations 
in these top-rated local 
daytime programs 










SACRAMENTO - STOCKTON 

ONLY KBET - GIVES YOU BOTH! 

TOTAL AREA SET COUNT: 417,381 



*weighted Sacramento and Stockton ARB, July, 1957 



KBET-TV CHANNEL 10 

SACRAMENTO <Jfc® CALIFORNIA 

BASIC £r CBS OUTLET 




Call H-R Television, Inc. for Current Avails 



32 



SPONSOR • - SEPTEMBER 1957 




SPONSOR 

7 SEPTEMBER 1937 



THE VITAL 30 DAYS 

Toughest programing decisions of year face t\ admen 

in weeks ahead. Here's what to <lo if (1) show look> like a winner, or if 
(2) show's a Hop with estimate of what it eo>t> to switch in mid-Stream 



I \ advertisers .mil their agencies are facing the toughest 
30 days of the war. 

During roughl) the next month, they'll -tail finding out 
how well their multi-million show investment and months 
of planning will paj out. \nd. more than during anj othei 
period in t\ history, clients are aware of the i i-k- a- well 
a- the bonanza pay-off for the companies that pick the 
w inners. 

I he questions of the month are: 

• How do you keep your show health) if the firsl ra1 
are good? 

• When should you start priming the pump il the\ aren't? 



• \\ hen 'I" \ ou drop the axe? 

These questions will !>.• resolved against a backdrop of 
last year's unprecedented 50 network t\ flo - 

But if then-'- been more anxierj and caution about shap- 
ing this fall's plan-, there"- also a realization that picking 

tin- show is just the first hurdle. 

\dinen learned costl) lessons from last season, \dmit- 
tedl) onl) top-grade product will ultimately bring down 
the rate of program turnover. Hut then 
against making costl) mi-take- during the fii-t crucial v 
of the season. 

Collected here are In tip- on what to do. what not to do 



SPONSOR • 7 SEPTEMBER 195*3 



33 



*'i>-5cpr.~ "" ,ocT 




VITAL 30 DAYS continued . . . 

and how to interpret your programing chances 

in the weeks immediately ahead. 

1. The first ratings are important hut don't 

tell the whole story. You ma) he able to judge 
whether your show is a real dog. but if first ratings are 
average or better, you can't really predict what the mid- 
season outlook will be. (See chart and separate story at 
right for a ratings analysis of last fall's hits and flops.) 

2. The type of show you bought will affect the wa\ 
you should interpret ratings. If you've got a new Western 
or drama or situation comedy, you can probably expect 
your show to take longer in building an audience than a 
musical starring a well-known personality. 

But remember, first ratings may be inflated by your own 
audience promotion. Sylvania's Buccaneers, for example, 
started well last year, then dropped off steadily as audience 
moved over to the competition after catching a few episodes. 

3. Competitive ratings have to be weighed carefulh. 
They will give you an indication as to strength of your com- 
petition and of the shows leading in and out of yours. If 
the competition seems too strong, this is a good time to 
start talking to the network about a schedule shift. 

Neither client, agency nor network should consider mak- 
ing such a major change on the basis of just one rating- 
period. But the earlier you explore the possibilities, the bet- 
ter your chances of achieving improvement before you reach 
the peak of the viewing season. 

4. On a live show, you can improve the format 1>\ 
huddling with the agency and the producer about show 
weaknesses. Pharmaceutical's Twenty-One is an example 
of one big hit from last season which made a sensational 
comeback. But it had to change its time period and sharpen 
its format in mid-season. 

5. With a film show, you're operating on a longer 
range, but changes are possible nonetheless. In many in- 
stances, show contracts this year are shorter than they had 
been. The 52-week contract is still the rule, but many pro- 
ducers allow a 26-week "escape clause" with a penalty. 

Usually it's too costly to make revisions in film shows 
before 13 weeks or more have elapsed, but in any case the 
time to discuss such revisions is right after initial ratings. 
Nestle's Oh Susanna built very slowly last year, got along 
mainly because its competitive shows were weak. However, 
during the interim, Don Cady, Nestle ad director, Bill 
Templeton, Bryan Houston's tv-radio v.p., and the show pro- 
ducer put their finger on the weakness of the show: im- 
( Please turn to page 84) 



Press parties, like NBC TV party (below) for Dinah Shore, are 
an important part of audience promotion prior to new show premiere, 
according to top admen and require additional promotion budget 



CAN YOU TELL fa 







Here's the track record for a 



cross-section of last season's hits 



and misses. It shows that a 



weak program can come back but 
most don't (see chart below) 



Thrived 



Died 
mid- 
stream 



Died 
end of 
season 



Comeback 






Show 


Net 


Cost 


Typ 




Steve Allen 


NBC 


$63,000 


- 
Yai 


Cheyenne 


ABC 


90,000 


We 




December Bride 


CBS 


28,000 


Sit 
Coi 




Tennessee Ernie 


NBC 


33,000 


Vai 




Playhouse 90 


CBS 


117,000 


Dn 




Lawrence Welk 


ABC 


14,500 


Mb 






High Finance 


CBS 


32,000 


Qu: 


Noah's Ark 


NBC 


38,000 


Sit 
Dn 




Herb Shriner 


CBS 


45,000 


Coi 




Stanley 


NBC 


41,000 


Sit 
Coi 




Walter Winchell 


NBC 


60,000 


Vb 








Conflict 


ABC 


90,000 


Dn 




Jackie Gleason 


CBS 


102,500 


Coi 




Hey Jeannie 


CBS 


41,000 


Sit 

Coi 




Robert Montgomery 


NBC 


52,000 


Dn 




Sir Lancelot 


NBC 


24,000 


Ad' 




Treasure Hunt 


ABC 


21,000 


Qn 








Oh Susanna 


CBS 


39,500 


Sit 

Coi 




People s Choice 


m-k: 


34,000 


Sit 
Coil 


^ 


Twenty-One 


NBC 


30,000 


Qu: 















_OP FROM THE FIRST MONTH'S RATING? 



C k .1 show thai starts olT feebl) 
stage a comeback? Vftei checking 
the track records of last season (as 
seen in the national \RB ratings), 
sponsor liml- tlii- i- the pattern: 

• \ weak show can come back. 

• But most shows that get "II t" ■< 
bad start in the first l<'\\ months "I .1 

. .(-.Hi are on the wa) out. 

Tin- chart below represents a cross- 
section sampling of the II 1 sponsored 
programs that started out in the ni^lii- 
time line-up last season. There were 
selected .1- representative <>f < 1 ► pro- 
grams thai survived; (2) programs 
1l1.1t died and i.'ii programs that start- 
ed <>IT falteringl) but recovered t<> fin- 



ish in ilic money. Network, t \ |"' and 
i osl lac I'M- were all taken into at > ount 
in pi. king the shows. 

Foi the total I I I Bhows stai ting on 
the aii last fall, the bui \ i\ al ret <>i<\ 

nail- like tlii- : 

1 .nn I tit 'I I tied 

thrived mid-season end "l season 

M In ;i 

' \ ah- I mil that ili'l ii"l 1 mil'' li.ii k 

at in-lit return ilii- fall a- daj timei - 
Treasure /Inn/. I)<> ) <>u Trust ) mn 

// ife?, Sir Lancelot and I In- lluccn- 
nm J, 1 

Evaluation <>f last season - buci esses 
shows the) are in all program types 
and ' ost ranges. I 1 u<\ souk 



Oct. 



Nov. 



Dec. 



Jan. 



Feb. 



1 1.- lost ground, but no font 
hi- been disi ai ded a- "1 nn its cou 

■ •I the growi I the 

beginning "I last season, the big mone) 
quizzes, fizzled and man) were dropped 
along the w.n. But one of thi 
Bounding bui c» — - ■ ■! the pasl 
was I wenty-One I M'-< I \ one <>f 
those few shows whii Ii . ame bai k af- 
t' 1 a bad start 

< )n the ■ osl side, the thrh ing Bhows 
are at both extremes. Playhouse 90 
CBS I \ . which baa the highest 
talent-produi tion tab "f an) weekl) 
-1 heduled nighttime program, 1 on- 
tia-i- with Lawrence « <■/! | \i;i I \ 
I Please turn to /»/-■ 



Mor. 



Apr. 



May 



17.7 


24.4 


22.5 


25.0 


18.9 


28.3 


30.4 


28.5 


28 6 


22.0 


23.9 


22.0 


23.4 


29.4 


27.8 


30.0 


29.5 


28.2 




28.2 


25.0 


32.0 


34.9 


35.0 


34.6 


33.7 


31.6 




25.8 


25.4 


31.0 


31.9 


31.6 


32.3 


31.8 


23.1 




20.9 


27.4 


21.5 


28.5 


28.6 


27.4 


26.7 


33.4 


32.2 


29.4 


33.6 


33.0 


36.6 


36.6 


33.4 


37.2 


28.0 



16.3 


15.1 


11.1 


8.6 








24.4 


17.5 


18.9 


19.7 


20.6 


19.7 






24.4 


22.7 


20.3 








- 


16.5 


16.6 


18.1 


15.2 


13.0 


16.4 


^— 


21.9 


20.0 


18.0 









20.3 


XX 


20.0 


19.4 


24.0 


22.9 


20 


21.5 


16.3 




33.8 


28.5 


32.8 


24.7 


24.8 


31.1 


25.2 


19.3 


12.7 


15.1 


15.2 


17.3 


21.1 


20.4 


23.0 


19.3 




38.7 


25.8 


28.1 


21.4 


20.5 


17.3 


16.7 


13.6 


18.1 




20.0 


16.7 


16.8 


14.8 


15.7 


17.6 


19.7 


12.5 


15.0 


12.0 


13.0 


16.3 


17.0 


16.6 


15.1 


15.1 


13.0 




Rating! have been compiled from ARB National R. costs from SPONSOB • agen< -• Riey do not Include commercials or time thn 

Tv Basics. Costs refer to avera.*.. Ung talent and production gross (with i'r igrmn »as not on the air that month. XX Rating was not taken thi- 



DAYTIME TV OUTPULLS ALL 

OTHER MEDIA FOR LYONS 

California van line puts 85% of its regional budget into 
tv, eooperates with Eastern group on national media. 
TV aim is to reach both men, women in early-morning 
hours with variety, businessmen in evening with news 



l^avtime television is the only re- 
maining hope for the local and re- 
gional tv advertiser." says Jack 
Smalley, account executive at Smalley, 
Ley itt & Smith. Los Angeles ad agency. 
"Tv is getting so expensive that even 
the big blue-chip boys are forced to 
drop top-ranking shows which are not 
efficient enough for them any more." 
Lsing daytime tv primarily. Smalley 
has gotten exceptional results for Lyon 
\ an Lines. Inc. Lyon is one of the 
largest commercial movers in the West 
with biatich offices in 11 major and 12 
minor markets, including Hawaii and 
Alaska. Lyon has 500 agents fran- 




chised \\ est of the Mississippi and an 
"inter-lining" arrangement with Whea- 
ton Van Lines, Inc. in eastern areas 
of the country. 

Frank Payne, president of Lyon, who 
supervises advertising for the company, 
works very closely with Smalley on 
campaigns designed to hit specific 
audiences. 

For three years they have had their 
best success in Western markets with 
once-a-week live spots on Panorama 
Pacific, weekday morning show from 
7 to 9 a.m. on the CBS Pacific tv net- 
work; the show's coverage area corre- 
sponds almost exactly to Lyon's. 




News show with Clete Roberts I r. ) hits 
businessmen's audience with special reports 
such as tin- on the spot interview from tsrae] 



Kickoff to Quern lor a Day sponsor- 
ship was Lyons Pres. Frank Payne crown- 
ing queen from among agents" wives 



"V\ ith this t\pe of daytime show." 
explains Smalley. "we reach both men 
and women, a pattern not too easily 
come by in tv. While many programs 
have specific appeal for men. and 
others for women, a v\ ell-produced 
early-morning show has ingredients 
for both. 

"By alternating our announcement 
in a different hour of the show each 
week, we cut diagonally across the life 
patterns of a very large section of the 
viewing area. \\ e eventually hit the 
time between tune-in and departure 
from homes of e\er\ viewer. 

"The result has been that returns 
keep coining in with very slight dim- 
inution of inquiry. V\ henever we want 
to test response, we just have Red 
i Rowe l make the moving-day kit 
offer." 

Payne and Smalley are justly proud 
of this kit with its 10 postcards — seven 
with official change of address forms. 
two cartooned for mailing to friends, 
and one addressed to Lvon request iiii: 
an obligation-free moving estimate. 

Red Roue demonstrates the kit pe- 
riodically in the commercial spot, 
shows how each kit is actually a single 
piece of heavy paper ( with perfora- 
tions so the postcards can be ea>il\ 
detached I . Rowe also discusses mov- 
ing-day tips, included with the kit. 



36 



SPONSOR 



7 SEPTEMBER 1957 




A 



lot (lallM un 



»0'ICI 0» CHANOI 0> »illi'.. 




i4 ^Uie 

TO LET YOU KNOW 

iOekc /Wo<K+tq to 



1/W* jI 



A> 




TO 



- 4 1 . * 



Antics "" I BS ["V's Panorama Pacifu with R«-i| 
Rowe pull audience. Hi- offer "f moving kit brings 
iveragi ol 200 requests, "more ilian from an) other 
ii or medium." Kit includes instructions on 
how i" pack, -inrc and move as well as 
which can I"- mailed to friends with addi 
Announcement is rotated in two-hour morning show 
audieni e ol both men, women 



"" \ luck) combination of ingredi- 
ents produced a kit thai people real!) 
like. Smalle) points out. "We've been 
using this form of advertising for 
years. The first one was copyrighted 
in 1947, and we've printed aboul a 
million so far. Seems we have to be 
constantly threatening lawsuits to stop 
imitations. Sometimes the} cop) word 
For word. 

"I very person who sends for one is 
a potential mover. We get at least 200 
requests every time we make the offer 
on Panorama. Nothing compares with 
it in any other medium. In fact, this 
three-year pattern on Panorama helps 
us net an accurate measure of audience 
for local participations." 



\t present, the onlj local participa- 
tion outside of Los Vngeles is in San 
Francisco, once-a-week on a KGO-T> 
afternoon movie-interview show con- 
ducted l>\ Bonnie Kever, who does live 
pitches on the moving-da) kit, alter- 
nating with a recently-filmed 60-second 
spot with Gene Bakei offei tag the kit. 

In other areas, a 20-se< ond ani- 
mated spot hack- up Panorama Pacific. 
These spots are placed strategical!) 
and sparing!) in all cities carrying the 
show except Bakersfield, onl) < i t > in 

the network chain where there i- DO 

primar) Lyon warehouse. 

The current spot in Los Vngeles, for 

example, runs on K.WT at 7 p.m. be- 



tween Robin Hood and Hums ami 
Wen, a time they've been bolding on 
to for dear life sine e Januar) 1954 
Pa) tie figures this ~p"t reai hes one ta 
& ei \ five of the 2, 105, 150 ti families 
in tin- greatei Los Angeles area, baaed 
on kWT- primar) coverage zone of 
7,960,700. 

The spot features the "Friendl) 
Lyon," who. unlike the "Fierce Lyon," 
the standard trademark, has undergone 
several changes since he was first 
drawn in 1939 b) (ail Buettner, a 
Diane) artist Vs cartoon s t) le s 
changed, so did the friendl) Lyon. In 
1947, a new lion was created b) an- 
other Disne) artist, Robert M 
[Please turn to page 17 



SPONSOR 



SEPTEMBER 1957 




RADIO IN 
TRANSITION 




Radio has not only 
changed radically in 
the past five years; it 
has virtually become a 
new medium — a medium which 
is still evolving, still 
growing, still in transi- 
tion. So dynamic is radio's 
growth that even those in 
close contact with it 
are not fullv familiar with 
the ways in which it is changing. 
Many admen toda\ think of 
radio in outdated terms; 
others have grown up in the tv 
era and have virtually ignored 
radios evolution. To provide 
perspective on radio as a medium 
in dynamic transition, sponsor 
plans a series of articles of 
which this is the first. These 
will be designed for practical 
understanding of where radio 
is headed and how the alert 
advertiser can make best use 
of its new characteristics. 









MUSIC-AN 



l 



t's a safe bet that within the next 
six months, some adman will jump up 
at a broadcasters' meeting and cry, 
"Juke box!" He will attack the 
"dreary, unimaginative sound of 
radio" and the source of this sound — 
"a stack of records and a teletype." 

He will be a hundred miles wide of 
the truth. 

Probably no greater misnomer 
exists in radio today than the term 
"music-and-news."' \\ hen accompanied 
by a sneer, it becomes still more of a 
misnomer, and as unfair as to hurl 
the description "nuts-and-bolts" at the 
motor car industry. 

Music-and-news are the building- 
blocks with which a station constructs 
its own programing profile. They may- 
be arranged in main ways; the com- 
binations are countless. It is these 
combinations — carefully arranged in 
most cases — that are gi\ ing 1957 radio 
its new sound. 

The new sound has not been de- 
veloped without a lot of careful plan- 
ning in the program departments. 

"There is a lot more to effective 
music and news programing than 
many people in the broadcasting busi- 
ness think," the vice president of a 
station group told sponsor, "—includ- 
ing some of the stations that are now 
attempting to do music-and-news." 

The fact is. that a top flight music- 
and-news station does not just slap 
records on a turntable or just rip 
news off the wire service tickers. 

The latter type of operation where 
disks are spun willy-nilly and d.j.'s 
with nothing to sa\ drone on and 
on deserve the censure of "music- 
and-news"" critics, but the smear 
should not extend to all those other 



Part JL of a ' ontintu ■ 

\EWS ARE ONLY BUILDING BLOCKS 

Often under attack a^ "an easy, unimaginative way out for broadcasters," 
tin- music-and-news formal is more sinned againsl than sinningt The truth 

is ili.ii all stations <lo not sound alike, it one takes tin- time to stud) 
their profiles, ami buyers of time will <!<> w<ll to stop, look ami listen 



radio stations who program with care. 

'^ii i «■ there are Mill a lot of -I < ■ | > | >\ 
operations, a well-informed adman 
told sponsor, "but the) hardl) ever 
an) national advertising business 
anyway. Die) re not worth worrying 
about." 

Discounting such stations, tnosl 
music-and-news programing falls into 
two patterns: 

i I i Pre-h format and 1 2) l'.»l-l\ 
formal. 

\- earl) as the middle I930's, a 
lew independents were pioneering 
long blocks "I re< orded music inter- 
spersed with regular]) scheduled news- 
casts ami managed to compete suc- 
cessful!) with network affiliates in 
their markets. Vmong these pioneers, 
and credited b) man) as the pioneer 

- \WI\\. New York. 

I he successful Format developed in 
pre-t> da) s was: (1) a w ide variet) 
"I music, perhaps 300 to 100 tunc-: 
strong personalities with some- 
thing to -a\ and who commanded 
fierce listener loyalty; (3) regular 
newscasts dealing with events of na- 
tional or international significance; 
1 i> an awareness of public service. 

I he programing was smooth and 
professional. Station promotion was 
conservative. This sound has survived 
and prospered and will be around for 
a long time. 

But i- was inevitable after the 
shock wave of television that new 
sounds should appear. The earl\ 
I950's found stations in every market 
struggling for advertising dollars 
shrunk by tv. 

One thing was clear. The radio 
listening habits of the nation had 
changed. No longer did the average 



listenei follow a radio program; he 
followed a stat ion. I his was because 
radio had lost its role as a mass 
entertainer. But il gained a new role — 
companion to an indh iduaL 

1 he question now was W hat does 
an individual expect from a compan- 
ion? He expects consistenc) it he is 
to have that companion at his side, 
the dial "frozen" to one station. 

Perhaps, reasoned man) station 
managers, the wide variet) of tunes 
formed too scattered a pattei n to give 
a ~i.it ion an indh idual pei sonalit) . 
Maybe the new- was too sophisticated; 
after all, wouldn't an indh idual rather 
listen to his companion chat about 
what happened at Broad and Main 
Streets in hi- home town than what 
happened in Congress? 

rhis thinking led broadcasters into 
experimenting with "formulas," al- 
though "formula has 1>\ now come to 
he almost as misconstrued a term as 
is the term "music-and-news itself. 

" \ foi mula suggests something 
rigid and Inflexible," one station man 
told sponsor, "and radio is too flexible 
a medium for that.' 

" I here - a h>i ol misunderstanding 
about the word "formula." said one 
rep sales manager. "" \ bettei wa) ol 
putting it i-: Smart management 
knowing what a communit) needs and 
then gh ing it to them." 

Just the same, some stations and 
station groups have drawn up pro- 
graming pattern- and even went BO 
far as to copyright them. But in most 
cases, these patterns are merel) the 
over-all strategy, and programing 
seems to work well within the frame- 

W oik. 

"You can't put music or an) other 



kind ol programing into a straight 
jacket formula, said a directoi in 
i Ii.ii ge oi prog raming. 

\(iuall\ a better phrase than 
"formula" would be a "general for- 
mal" oi even a "philosoph) ol mus 
Most stations now doing a su< i essful 
job of programing have carefull) 
studied theii market and it- audit 
io learn the prefereni e of the people. 
I i om tlii- has ■ ome a -killful blend 

ol top musil al hits and -land irds BS 

a main ingredient Bpi< ed w ith ot 
ional up-and-coming releases and -u< h 

specialties a- -how tune-. I la — ieal. and 

novelties. 

( )ne int( rest inj of the i ar- 

rent musii al si ene is the ebbing awaj 
of rock-'n-roll on popularit) li-t- in 
favor of more lush numbers. [*hus even 
the top 10's are under -"in- a distini t 
change which i- bound to alter the 
sound of man) stations. 

\- for new-, main of th( --i\e 

and resourceful stations are aln 
..i,i -i ooping the dail) newspa 
with on-the-spot coverage via mobile 
units, beeper phone-, tapes and other 
inno\ ations of modern radio. 

Public Ben ice, des< i ibed b) one 
station man |o( olarl) as "anything 
that isn't paid for" ai tuall) mean- 
much more than that x <tv ice to a 
communit) was one of the things left 
to radio after television took over the 
entertainment arm. Contsequently, 
listeners turn to radio for such in- 
formation as weather, time, traffii 
port-. In -"tin- i ases the) gel much 
more. Controvers) pro-ram- geared 
to 'i\i< improvement give audie 

the opportunitv to contact their -ta- 
tion with idea- on schools, road-, and 
municipal administration with the 



SPONSOR • 7 SEPTEMBER 1957 



39 



Music-and-news is probably the most 
.nis-used term in radio today. It's much 
more than a stack of disks and a teletype 



knowledge that their pleas — if at all 
valid — will get a hearing and he aired 
to other listeners. Local radio has 
accomplished many crusades includ- 
ing one reported in News and Idea 
V. rap-l |) this issue in u hull the price 
of gasoline in a community was re- 
duced. 

New formats are being v o~!'ed out 
all the time within the framework of 
music-and-news. This is the post-tv 
pattern designed to get the largest 
possible audience and then hold it 
day in and day out. Stations have 
found their own personalities in pro- 
graming and become identified by 
them. 

In contrast to the "pre-tv format,"' 
what distinguishes the "post-tv for- 
mat?" 

Here is a rather general description 
of the latter: 

1 . A narrower variety of music, in 
most cases the top 40 tunes ( right 
now a trend appears developing to 
extend the top 40 to the top 50 1 . The 
interesting thing about top 40's is that 
preferences vary from market to mar- 
ket and so post-tv formats, with heavy- 
emphasis on the local, will use their 
own local selections rather than na- 
tional polls. 

2. News of local appeal rather than 
of deep national significance. On-the- 
spot coverage via heepers and mobiles 
often play a big part in this treatment. 

3. Personalities who are subordi- 
nate to the music they play. In the 
case of many group operations, per- 
sonalities command less fierce loyalty 
and can be moved from station to sta- 
tion. 

4. Growing interest in public service. 
In most cases, the music follows a 

pattern throughout the day geared to 
who is listening and what mood is 
suitable. Thus early morning traffic 
time records may tend to be sprighth 
and bouncy, yet not laced with rock-'n- 
roll that would drive away adults. 
Daytime music may tend to include 
more standards and nostalgic vocals to 
soothe the housewife. As afternoon 
traffic hours draw in, the tempo picks 
up again. Then in the early evening, 
news is hit hard — all kinds of news — 
to serve as an evening newspaper for 



the relaxing male. Through the night, 
comes more music and some public 
sendee features. But in the music de- 
partment, throughout the broadcast 
hours the top 40 usually get the heavi- 
est plaj . 

"A lot of mud has been thrown at 
those "formula' stations that grind out 
the top 40s," an agency timebuyer 
told sponsor. "They say such tunes 
only attract the kids. But results and 
surveys prove that mud isn't justified. 
Those stations are usualh getting their 
share of adults."' 

Success of this sort is achieved 
through planning. Some stations car- 
ry this planning to the nth degree. 
They may program in this fashion: In 
every quarter hour segment, four tunes 
are played in this order: ( 1 1 a top 40, 
upbeat and bouncy; (2) a top 40, con- 
trasting, lush: (3 1 a standard; (4l an 
up-and-coming disk. 

On some stations the 15-minute seg- 
ment may begin several seconds ahead 
of the clock-break so that a listener 
moving from another station just 
ahead of its station-break will hit upon 
that first bouncy top 40 tune. The new 
radio is no hit-or-miss proposition. 

There are two things on the fringe 
edge of programing that mark the 
post-tv, or so-called "formula" opera- 
tion. One of these is the before-men- 
tioned sublimation of personalities to 
the show. 

In many cases, the disk jockey de- 
spite a handsome salarv I many take 
home as much as do the artists whose 
records they spin ) does not even re- 
tain the right to his own name. This 
is particularly true with the group 
operations. Thus a d.j. named John 
Jones in the New York market could 
be moved to the West Coast without 
any furor among his fans. The X. Y. 
station owns his name, and on the fol- 
lowing Monday, another d.j.. imported 
from Chicago or Buffalo, could come 
into town and take over the mike as 
John Jones. 

The other — and perhaps more sig- 
nificant — mark of the post-tv station is 
the almost fanatic emphasis on pro- 
motion. No longer is a station con- 
tent to be heard — it must be seen as 
well. This is accomplished with rov- 



ing show stars, mobile units, flagpole 
announcers, and animal acts in the 
streets. 

As for the stations themselves, not a 
trick is missed in bringing the audi- 
ences into these promotions. Treasure 
hunts and giveaways and contests are 
designed to make it a risk to tune out. 
At one time or another such excite- 
ment is branded as "gimmicks" or 
"hoopla." The\ have drawn almost as 
much censure as "music-and-news." 

"I m tired of hearing station promo- 
tion referred to as 'Gimmicks,' " said a 
station rep. "The fact is these stations 
— which are advertising media them- 
selves — believe in the idea of advertis- 
ing, and practice it. What's wrong 
with advertising themselves?" 

The hardest job of working out a 
good music-and-news format is experi- 
enced by the program directors at net- 
work affiliates. Their music-and-news 
operations cannot be planned on a day- 
long basis but must be fitted into sta- 
tion time. The audience they attract 
with network programing, many reps 
and station people say, is not al\\a\s 
the audience that goes for music-and- 
news, and vice-versa. Thus to be suc- 
cessful they must blend their net and 
local programing into one smooth, 
flowing operation. 

How important is all of this music- 
and-news philosophy to the advertiser? 

The answer is: extremely important. 








WHO'S AFRAID OF TELEVISION? 

RADIO'S NEW RICHES 



40 



SPONSOR • 7 SEPTEMBER 1957 



"\\ Inn \ "ii li ■• >k ,ii a station, said .1 
timebuyer, "you h'<>k al the program- 
ing n"t onl) mi the basis ol researt h 
Inii mi persona] judgmenl as well. Ii 
i- generall) H ■< - ke\ in audience < "in- 
position. 

"Naturally, he went <>n. we can I 
den) thai .1 pi imai \ concei n in an) 
buj is cost-per- 1,000. \ftm all we 
■ ■ ■ 1 j —1 jii-tif\ ever) bu) to ourselves, 
in mil accounl groups, to the client 
and to the stations we didn't bu) . 

"Bui it is interesting to look behind 
the good cost-per- 1,000 and realize 
that ii i- Bound programing thai has 
resulted in delivering foi us 1 in - right 
audience al the right price." 

"Radio is -till in .1 state of flux," 
another adman said, "bul music-and- 
news will be around for quite awhile. 
Ol course the concept must eventual!) 
evolve into something more. Mir 
blending ol music-and-news with pub- 
lic service is one step in that direction. 

Still another trend thai ma) be de- 
veloping is the programing of more 
'"talk — 1 1 i 1 > — soapers, mysteries, ad- 
ventures. Recorded program services 
are reporting a big increase in such 
~.ilt— . Some agenc) people see more of 
such >tri|>r» appearing on stations, espe- 
cial!) in the nighttime hours, but thev 
do not view it as significant yet. 

Whatever will evolve, one thing i- 
certain. More and more interest is 
going into radio programing. \- t\ 



The Three Music & News Formats 

Hit or miss: ' ; the il ghtless, willy-nill) programing 

thai has justifiabl) brought down the ■ ■ 

Foi 1 1 1 1 ~ . nothing 1- needed bul .1 turntable, lomi n 

news ti< k. 1 and 1 garrulous 'li-k jockej v% x 1 1 ■ nothini 

Prc-tv format: Man) admen and bn redil 

\\ \ I \\ \.u 't m k. with tin- old line concept ■•! ' I > 1 wide 
i.iin i\ ..1 turn », (2) regular national 01 inl 

national import dities and ' li publii service 

Post-tv format: ^n nil -1 1 .,1 pre-h broadi • - 1 1 n ^ . thii 

racterized b) • I » the top l« ■ ■ ■■ K) tunes in a market, 
news "i local interest rathei than national, 
1I1 1 > 1 1 1 1 1 i • Bervice, 1 i) stal promotions high with excitement 



,ii some othei job. I hese too are be- 
coming more a< live. Vudieni e atti- 
titudes are being studied and pilot 
studies reveal thai music-and-news pro- 
graming is much more popular than 
it- critics would ha\ e us believe. 
\i\ ei tin less something mot 
bound in r\ olve. Vs one rep said, "I 
can almost foresee 1 time when eat Ii 
market w ill be si ratified : eat h si 
v. ill represent an indh idual station 
pi ograming foi 1 spet ifit audit 
I n some mat kets, it's almost reat hed 
this pattern ahead) ." ^ 



itseli turns more ami more to musii 
(for example, such network shows as 

Pal I! e. Law rence \\ elk. I'm 1 \ 

• lomo, Dinah Shore, I' rank Sinai ra, 
\al King Cole, Gu) Mitchell) ami to 
news coverage both world-wide ami 
local, radio cannot afford to be backed 
into a i in Mm again. 

What i- radio doing now with an 
c\ c iii the future? 

Several station rep (inn- have re- 
centl) named programing consultants 
in assist their stations. Others have 
had them foi sometime, often doubling 




Life features 
radio's big boom 

\ recent issui magazine i«« ■ i nt •■■! 

mil the i that railin has made in 

tli. face <>i i\ independents ha\>- picked 
n|i more than 1340 million in revenue Ia~i 
year; number ol \M and FM stations has 
doubled since 1 ( >1K. The art i< If perhaps 
unconscious!) turned it- spotlight mi out- 
of-station promotional gimmicks. V: this 
i- onl] .1 part nf the storj in radio's come- 
back, anil (ii.int- up the fart that music- 
and-news as ■ concept or philosophy i- - 
time- judged more li> what appears "n the 
surface than t ■ v it- real role in community. 



• LIFE 



SPONSOR • i SEPTEMBER 1957 



41 




AUDIENCE 
PROMOTION 
CHECK LIST 



W 



You can build your program audience 
by hitting hard with a coordinated 
promotion aimed in three directions: 
employees, consumers and dealers 



W 



hat price audience promotion? Not very much 
in terms of what you get for your money. 

This is the contention of audience promotion special- 
ists collectively and one 20-year veteran in particular. 
He is Bertram J. Hauser, long-time network and sta- 
tion promotion executive who now has his own adver- 
tising and consulting business in New York City land 
who recently returned to MBS as executive v.p.). 

He's prepared a simple checklist of fundamentals 
for any advertiser who wants to promote a bigger audi- 
ence for his tv or radio program. He themes any such 
promotion effort to one word — "coordination." To 
work, the plan must be a three-way effort directed at 
the consumer, com pain personnel and the dealers. 

The cost? Says Hauser: "A sponsor might spend 
S2 million a year on a tv show and get a 15 rating. 
Yet if he spends $15,000 a year on intelligent audience 
promotion he can end up with a 20 rating. The first 
rating costs 81 33.000 for each point; the increase costs 
$3, a point!" 

Hens Hauser' s three-um checklist. It applies 
equally to local and national, radio or television. ^ 



Printed announcements and other mailings. These 
concern news of the program, particularly at the start of the 
advertising campaign, and should he mailed to special 
groups. 

Post cards. These help build an audience right from 
the start when supplied to advertiser employees and other 
appropriate groups. Cards contain an announcement of the 
program, time and station. 

Press releases. New- reports and pictures should he 
mailed regularly to newspapers and to trade magazines both 
before and after the campaign has started. 

Telephone mentions. Telephone operators working 
for the client company should be instructed to give a brief 
mention to the program when answering all incoming calls. 

□ Classified advertising. All dealers selling the adver- 
tiser's merchandise should be listed in the classified tele- 
phone director)'. Cross mentions should be made on the 
program. 

Radio and television advertising. The sponsor's pro- 
gram should be mentioned on other programs sponsored by 
the same company. Spot announcements, in copv, transcrip- 
tion or film format, should be supplied to dealers for use at 
the local level. 

Newspaper advertising. Program tie-ins can be listed 
in run-of-paper display ads but spotlight advertisements 
should be used on the radio and tv pages and other special 
pages. Mats should be sent to dealers for incorporation into 
their local advertising and for use as their own spotlight ads. 

Magazine advertising. Program tie-ins here. too. can 
be used in display ads for a variety of magazines — fan, 
general consumer and specialized. 

Trade paper advertising. Dealers and their sales 
people show aroused interest in a company and its products 
as a result of trade paper advertising. 

Transit and outdoor advertising. Tie-in copv can 
be used on billboards, in subway, elevated and railwav cars, 
in street cars and buses and on delivery trucks of the spon- 
sor and his dealers. 

□ Movie trailers. Motion picture shorts and trailers can 
promote the program and the advertiser and be run coop- 
eratively with local movie houses. 

Personal appearances. Stunts and personal appear- 
ances have a lot of appeal. Invitations to tune in to the 
show can be handed to people on the street: special street 
parades and floats can be arranged. This item on the pro- 
motion agenda has at least 10.000 variations! 

Dealer promotion. Dealers can distribute to their 
customers and prospects such printed material as special 
booklets, tabloid newspapers, pamphlets and novelties. 

In-store displays. Dealers should also be supplied 
with window streamers, placards, counter cards, standing 
■ lisplav > and other point-of-sale material. 



42 



SPONSOR • 7 SEPTEMBER 1957 



Package ■tuffers. Dealers can distribute such re- 
minders .1- stuffers, inserts, stickers, blotters and handbills 
w liicli desci ibe t li<* shot* . 

Free sample*. Samples of tin- product can be circu- 
lated with an enclosure w 1 1 i c - 1 1 describes the program 

Premium. <>n the show, the advertisei can offei some 
novelt) <m article of uiilit\ value. This can I"- issued free 
or for a self-liquidating price \vith "i without a label "i 
so in- other pari of the package. 

Contest. r.ntr\ iiiiu a contest on the sponsor's pro- 
l: 1 .iiii ran either be minus strings "I an) kind oi with the 
stipulation ol proof "I purchase. 

Fan letters. Tin- sponsor should acknowledge promptly 
all listener and viewer mail. Answers can include promo- 
tional literature and even the name and address of the 
nearest dealer. 

Free tickets. Ihr advertiser can offer free studio 
tickets to the program, which the audience gets from the 
station, sponsor <>r through dealers. 

Stationery. Special radio and or teleiision letterheads 
can be used, along with bills and envelopes. 

Post ago meter. Hie program ran also be mentioned 
on the postage meter plate which most companies have 
these days. 



To reach employees 

Dramatic presentation of the program at sales meet- 
ings and conventions. 

Articles about the show in internal house organs and 
emphasis on the program's talent and am actual sales 
known to have been made 1>\ the advertising. 

Periodic bulletins to the sales -talT and other em- 
ployees about the program and it- results. 

Bulletin board announcements in the factor) and of- 
fices of the advertiser. 

Mimeographed copies of commercial continuit) or 
the other announcements used on the show. 

Enclosures deserihiiii: the program in salar) envelopes 
and in dividend or annual report mailings to stockholders. 

Prizes to employees fur program improvement sug- 
gestions. 

Special tune-in parties given b) employees. 

Proofs of trade paper and other advertising which is 

rdinated with the program sent to salesmen and others 

in the compan) . 

Copies of listener mail forwarded to salesmen in 
the field. 

Slide film showings and regular film presentations 
on the broadcast advertising campaign before the sales -tatT 



no conjunction with a special printed piece about th> 

gt .mi foi emplo) '•<•- < . 

Broadcasl 1 i «-U. #-i — made available t" emplo 

To reach dealers 

Broadcasl one ot more of the programs from 1 
meet in^ "i com enl ion. 

Salesmen's portfolio- which include full details of 
the campaign f<u dealers visited b) compan) Balesmei 
jobbei salesmen. 

Portable in "i radio sets for the salesmen so the) - in 
tune to the -how while visiting dealers it it's a da I 
vehicle. 

Catalogue insert giving program details. 

Preliminary announcements to dealers in tin- form 
of jumbo radiogram blanks 01 telegraph blanks. 

Advance proof- ..I magazine, newspapei and trade 
ads For mailing to dealers 

Merchandising material in dealei mailings, with de- 
scriptions of li<>\\ the) can tie in with the program and 
offers "I additional material. 

Weeklj program schedule mailings with detailed in- 
formation to dealers. 

Prizes for dealers ami ileik- whose customers win 
pi izes in an) kind of contest. 

Radio ami/or television window display competi- 
tion- for dealers. 

Trade paper advertising with news of the 
which reaches the dealership. 

Reprints of articles about the show which are printed 
in the advertiser's house organ. 

Tabloid new-paper which emphasizes the program, 
listener mail and the sales experieni e of other dealers. 

Letterhead- hitting the radio and or t\ effort in cor- 
respi mdence h ith dealei 5. 

Broadcasl imprint- on ..tin 1 stationer) and mailings 
in dealer correspondence 

I Envelope stuffers, blotters and the like in outgoing 

dealer mail. 

Special stickers plugging the show on envelopes, letter- 
beads and billheads sent to dealer-. 

Tie-in plate on the postage metei cancelling machine. 

Karnes and addresses from listener mail sent to deal- 
er- in those areas 

Tiekets to studio broadcasts furnished to dealer- for 
their own and their customers use 

Descriptive broadsides and bulletins. fhese can be 
combination broadside and window poster.) 



SPONSOR 



. SEPTEMBER 1951 








Art Porter, Jlf "T v.p. and media director 



Rill Dekker, WcCann-Erickson media v.p. 




Are trade paper ads good or bad? Do they sell or Donald Cody, advertising v. P ., Nestle 

stultify? Targets of these ads — top plans people — give 
reactions while judging ads in SPONSOR competition 

CANDID CAMERA QUOTES 
ON TRADE PAPER ADS 



L.i-l week, five top-rung advertising 
professionals called the shots on the 
quality of trade paper advertising. 
The) ca-t their ballots in sponsor's 
first annual tv and radio trade paper 
awards competition — and they threw 
in some personal comments as well. 

The quintet pictured in candid snap- 
shots above were equalb candid in 
their impressions of the over-all calibre 
and quality of trade paper advertising. 
That's win they're not quoted directly. 

The group represents decision-mak- 
ing people to whom most trade paper 
advertising is directed. The judges in- 
cluded Donald Cady. vice president in 
charge of general advertising, The 



Nestle Co.; \^ illiam Dekker. vice presi- 
dent in charge of media. McCann- 
Erickson; Rav Jones, supervisor of 
spot availabilities. Young & Rubicam: 
Frank B. Kemp, vice president and 
media director. Compton, and Arthur 
Porter, vice president and media 
director. J. Walter Thompson. 

( Choices as to the winners in 14 dif- 
ferent trade paper advertising categor- 
ies were being tabulated at presstime. 
SPONSOR will publish a special awards 
section in its 5 October issue which 
will include reproductions of ads which 
won first prizes in each category. I 

Here are some of the things the 
judges had to sa\ about the entries: 



Copy: Mam of the judges were 
familiar with campaigns and cop) 
themes because of their close reading 
of various trade magazines. Despite 
an) prior knowledge of campaigns. 
they perused both cop) and art. 

One said. "Didn't we just look at 
another station entry which claims it's 
No. 1 in the market? How can the) 
both be?" 

\nother: ""There's too much cop) 
here, and it doesn't really say any- 
thing anyway because it hits too man) 
cop) points. If there's an objective 
or a selling theme. / can't find it 

And "Why don't they tell us about 
their market instead of about rating X 



44 



SPONSOR 



7 SEPTEMBER 1957 




A'm Jones, broadcast supervisor, Y&R 




Intnl. II. Kemp, vice president and media director o) Compton tdvertising • 



or using call letters in type an inch 
and a lialf high? \fler all. there are 
{.HUD sets of call letters in the country 
and the average agency guy or adver- 
tiser i:et> tired of buckey e t\ pe. I hal s 
do way to make yourself stand out. 

One judge suggested including a 
small coupon at the corner of an ad 
and offering a set <>f market data to 
anyone requesting it. 

Vrt work: I lie judges were ipiick 
to -pot t lie ads which had been as- 
sembled and produced b\ a local ad- 
vertising agency and those which were 
\er\ often less professional!) produced 
within the station it-elf. 

Said one: "For the little bit of COSl 
thej save, it seems to me they'd be far 
better oil to put out that extra money 
and gel a really top-notch art and copy 
job. The art work in mam of these 
ads look- like a 17-year-old did it!" 

\nd another commented: "This ad 
has a very strong selling theme but 
they ve used a stock photograph which 
cheapens the whole approach and 
lessens the impact. \nd so much 
cheesecake! 1 like some cheesecake, 
but it has to be good and these women 



couldn't win as Mi— Potato Sack ol 
the year! 

One said "If- only the besl ads 
which have whal I like to see — a mark 
of identification. It can be a logo oi 
some kind ol a trademark, a style or a 
format. These people need to read 
more consumer advertising to see what 
really good ads are! 

Presentation: The 123 entries in 

SPONSOR'S awards contest weighed up 
to 35 pounds each. Some were -lib- 
milted in ]<>c paper folder-, other- in 
elaborately bound volume- with expen- 
sive hand-done art work. 

One judge said "I'm not ol the school 
which indue- a book by its cover. Bui 
some of these have such a lousy cove: 
that I'm prejudiced against the book 
and others have such a superb and 
elaborate cover thai it far outshines 
the contents!" 

\nd. "This presentation i- better 
than the ad-! If they'd used the same 
ingenuity in the ads thai they put into 
the folder . . ." 

Imagination: Ml of the judj 
because of the business they re in. 
were keenly aware of ingenuity — 
whether it was in campaign objective. 



ail work, copy "i layout design. 
"I like the offbeat i\ pe ..I ad w hich 

i- -till inbeal in term- of making a 

point and then selling it. 

Said another: "It take- a lot of 
imagination to settle on a theme and 
then cat i j ii through effectively in a 
continuing set ies oi a'\~. loo many "I 
these bave no consistent j . 

"How much imagination does it 
take to say you've gol the most socko 
new -bow in the world? Mid then 
not to really tell what kind of a -bow 
it i- or why it's so great? You'd sure 
never know a lot i.i these people are 
in advertising because they don't know 
the first thing about selling themselves! 
I wonder, looking ai some of these .\>\~. 
if they know how t" -ell for me. 

The besl ads: Many of their criti- 
cal comments, "I course, wen 1 fa\ < >r - 
able. What do they think goes into an 
ideal .ai' Most important, they agreed, 
wa- .i definitive statement "t purpose 
— a clear-cut objective which the ad 
then -el- out to achieve in a combina- 
tion of art and copy. They responded 
to originality, a feeling or i me •■( 
a total advertisement, persuasiveness, 
i ontinuiti . ^ 



SPONSOR • , SKI'TEMBER 195' 



15 



THE SOFTY SELL 

West Coast show now seeking syndication on live basis 
is aimed at pet lovers. It's unique use of pathos 
pre-selects market for pet food, other animal items 



^^o\ent\-fivt" million people yearn 
longingly for the patter of little feet — 
little pets' feet, that is. Some of these 
people manage to resist the temptation 
to have a Great Dane or a chimpanzee 
around the house. But others — mil- 
lions of others — willingly clutter up 
their abodes with bird cages, kitty lit- 
ter, rubber bones and bananas. 

It's this latter group, the one which 
is ripe for such pet necessities as food 
and flea killers and for such frivolities 
as parakeet bells and sequined dog 
sweaters, which makes up the heart- 
land of any tv or radio audience for 
the National Pet Exchange. NPE is a 
22-year-old program package of Frank 



Parke Wright, a member of the Ameri- 
can Humane Society. 

His show, Pet Exchange, has long 
been a commercial and audience suc- 
cess in Los Angeles and San Francisco 
for Calo Dog Food. On the strength 
of this viewer-sponsor interest. Wright 
is in the process of syndicating the 
show nationally. Unlike most such 
programs, hell syndicate it locally, 
market-by-market, as a live show. 
He'll move into an area, establish a 
liaison with the Society for the Pre- 
vention of Cruelty to Animals, instruct 
local people in the format. 

His format: introduce waifs of pet- 
dom. provided by the local SPCA, and 



ask for foster parents among the audi- 
ences. His score to date: one million 
assorted pets placed in homes. 

He scored these successes in Los 
Angeles in working with the SPCA: 
in one year, he was credited with intro- 
ducing 25.000 pet-seekers to the local 
chapter; in one week, when the SPCA 
asked for money to buy a pet ambu- 
lance, he received S4,750 in nickels, 
dimes and quarters from t\ viewers. 

The show limits its entertainment to 
the pets themselves, and its commen- 
tary to a description of the pets and 
a summary of purposes by an SPCA 
spokesman. 

Many an experiment with people as 
adjuncts to the pets have proven the 
pets make a much bigger impact. In 
star-struck Hollywood, Wright used 
pretty girl singers to serenade the 
pets and then, later, a series of pro- 
vocative Hollywood starlets. But, he 
says, "We found our viewers objected 
to the movie stars. What they tune in 
to see are pets!" 

Pet Exchange is being sold to sta- 
tions as well as to sponsors for all ma- 
jor markets in Canada. Mexico and the 
U. S. except Los Angeles and Holly- 
wood, where Calo will continue to keep 
its franchise. Wright himself is happy 
about the fact that "many thousands 
of carloads of canned dog and cat food 
have been sold." ^ 



Dogs outpull starlets in viewer interest any day says Frank Wright, second from left, whose program >ells dog and cat food on the coast 




LYONS TV EFFORT 

[Continued from page 37) 

(who's now in charge of exploitation 
f»»r Disneyland). This lion >iill ap- 
pears "ii the kil and other mailing 
pieces. 

The i uncut linn was created b) Milt 
Schaffer <>f Era Productions, \\li<> pro- 
duced tin- Bpots. Milt also creates and 
develops the ideas. In the latest, the 
lion does the pitch. The slogan "Let 
Lybn guard your goods is included. 
as it has been for years in all promo- 
tional and advertising material. 

\~ ill the past, this filmed spot i- 

now available free to agents nationally, 

adapted to 1 "> seconds so that the agent 
can add his own slide. Agents also 

do their own timclun ini:. 

Cost of the spot ($2,500) comes 
from the regional budget of over 
1200,000; the cost of open-ending 

$250), from the national budget. 
The national budget, a closely- 
guarded secret, is arrived at 1>\ a con- 
tribution from each of .i(M) agents of 
one per cent of his total volume, 
matched in each case In an equal one 
per cent from the company. 

This is a fixed budget, never altered 
from the time it is submitted to an 
advertising committee of agents for 
appro al each I'elu uar\ . 

Smalle\ regards Queen for a Day on 
ladio as one of their best national 
buys. [Tiej participated in Queen on 
more than 500 Mutual stations from 
early in February. 1957 until it went 
oil the air in June I cost wa> $] 1,000). 
They had long been moving the 
"Queen." if that was her desire, for 
the value of the plug, so the show was 
a natural choice when the\ decided to 
tr\ a national radio show. 

The show was tied in with Satunlav 
Evening Post ads in March, \pril. Ma\ 
and June: one eighth page ad each 
month with themes such as: ■"You'll 
be Queen on moving da) !" 

Newspaper mats supplied agents also 
carried out the Queen theme, often 
l ith space at the bottom for a "tune 
in" plug. 

Thus, national advertising com- 
prised three media this year — radio, 
national magazines, advertising mate- 
rials for agents. Smalley anticipates 
that with the demise of Queen on 
radio, next year's budget will include 



onlj two media because he doesn t 

feel that tin- pirv.ni state of network 
radio will produce a show of Queen 
for u Du\ b calibre. 

I he --how a departure fi 0111 i ad 10 in 

.1 une didn t upsel I \ on a applet art, in 

that their big ail push conic- between 
March and June, at which point the\ 

l*i)ll their magazine and radio promo- 
tion nationally, letting the agents carrj 
tin- ball local!) with the materials 
Smalle) supplies. I he feeling is that 

the effect of national advertisinc will 



have suffii ienl impetus t" > ai i \ ovei . 

if backed up b\ hit al exploital i">> 

until October, the end ol the peak 
moving season (March-Septembei 

I he ill-. - »enl t" agents art I 
ond spots with cop) suggesting various 
15-second closes. 

\\ ith .i few exceptions, the 500 Lyon 
,i ents are all I" 1 ated W est of the Mis- 
sissippi. To make a COast-tO-COast op- 
eration possible without change of 
equipment, an "inter-lining arrange- 
ment was worked oul three years ago 



WHLI 

"THE VOICE OF LONG ISLAND' 



DELIVERS 

A Major Independent Market 
NASSAU COUNTY 



POPULATION 



BUYING INCOME 

Total $2,928,340,000 

Per Family $ 8,503 

RETAIL SALES $1,534,786,000 lj_th 

Food Store $ 403,423,000 9th 

Auto Store $ 252,922,000 
Lumber, Bldg., 

Hdware $ 113,879,000 

Apparel $ 113,070,000 

Cas Stations $ 86,967,000 

Furn. House etc. $ 81,857,000 



1,180,000 10th among U.S. Counties 
among U.S. Counties 



8tb 
5th 



11th 

5_th 
13th 
10th 
14th 



- '•' _ t, Maj 

One station WHLI nas a larger daytime audience in the MAJOR 

LONG ISLAND MARKET than any other station! 

• SOON WHLI WILL INCREASE ITS POWER TO 10,000 WATTS 



Big Bo 

> Nassau, parts o 
Population 
Net Income 
Retail Sales 


nus 

Queen 


Coverage 

S. Suffolk & Brooklyn i 

3,063,135 
S6, 730, 794, 000 
S3, 365, 152, 000 





WHLI 

HEMPSTEAD 
LONG ISLAND, N. Y. 



AM 1100 
FM 98 3 



unmet 4 



Paul Codofsky. Pres. & Cen. Mgr 
Joseph A. Lcnn. Exec. VP Sales 



Represented by Cill-Perna 



SPONSOR 



SEPTEMBER 1957 



47 



with Wheaton Van Lines, Inc., operat- 
ing East of the Mississippi, with head- 
quarters in Indianapolis. 

I lie Lyon-Wheaton combination 
ranks among the t<>p 10 nationally. 

A long-distance mover only, with 
do local warehousing or moving serv- 
ices. Wheaton's advertising differs 
radical!) from Lyon's. It is. of course, 
all national, primarily concentrated in 
national consumer and trade maga- 



zines. But their approach is the same. 

This year. Good Housekeeping was 
\\ heaton s main national medium. 
w here the schedule was about com- 
parable to Lyon's in the Post. 
Wheaton stresses direct mail and mail- 
ing pieces, but has been considering 
filmed t\ commercials for distributing 
to agents, as Lyon does. 

National television, as Smallev ex- 
plains, is impractical for a commercial 



EVENINGS from 7 P. 
WHEC, Rochester, N. Y. 

Gets the BIGGEST 
Share of Audience — 



25% 



* 



STATION B 



STATION C 




'Latest Rochester Metropolitan Area PULSE, Report March 1957 
'Our New Class D Nighttime Announcement Rate 

BUY WHERE THEY'RE LISTENING: _ 



WHEC 



EVERETT. MtKINNEY. lot Htm Tort. Cfc.cogo, LEE F OCONNEU CO . la 



NEW YORK 
5,000 WATTS 



mover because it does not hit all lo- 
cales where agents are. 

On the other hand. 85' r of the re- 
gional budget goes to television, 
handled by Jackie Britton Johns. t\ 
director of Smalley. Levitt & Smith. 

With packager Jack Douglas. Jackie 
Johns produced Lyon's first tv venture, 
an ambitious attempt in May of 1951 
to create the company's own show in 
Los Angeles. It was seen on KNBH 
l now KRCA) at 2:30 p.m.. between 
Monty Margetts" cooking show and 
Bill Stulla's Parlor Parly. 

Titled Meet Your Neighbor, it intro- 
duced a housewife moving into a new 
neighborhood to her new minister, 
grocer, children's schoolteacher. The 
research was prodigious, the expense 
too great, but they stuck it out for 26 
weeks ... or. "until collapse," as Mrs. 
Johns puts it. 

Experimentation didn't end there. 
They have tried horseracing. special 
events, sports events. Thev purchased 
a seven-minute segment of KNXT's 
late evening Big Xeivs in January 
1953 on Monday, adding Wednesday 
and Friday in April, until they can- 
celled a year later. 

It was that month that thev pur- 
chased their first announcement on 
Panorama Pacific on the CBS Pacific 
tv network three times a week. This 
schedule was maintained for two vears. 
In April they dropped the Mon- 
day and Thursday spots, retaining 
Tuesday only and with demonstrations 
alternating between Red Rowe and tv 
announcer Tom Skinner. 

"This show is so effective for us," 
Jackie declares, "that we keep it vear 
round as the backbone of our regional 
tv. Of course we have to keep our 
nighttime spots or wed lose the good 
adjacencies." 

The 20-second spot at 7 p.m. on 
KNXT was purchased in January 1954, 
and the current contract will not be 
up until 8 April 1958. 

On 13 Januarv 1957. L\on assumed 
full alternate sponsorship of Clete 
Roberts" Special Report on KNXT, an- 
other experiment aimed at a special 
audience. As Smalley said: 

"Roberts" eyewitness reports of his 
visits to world trouble spots produced 
excellent results among a rather spe- 
cialized following of opinion leaders 



18 



SPONSOR 



7 SEPTEMBER 19.1. 



and businessmen it might nol have 
been possible to reach on an) othei 
|o< .il show. Ii led to the opening up 
of business with large companies \\\\<< 
transfei personnel and must -lii|> their 
lin nishings, as well. 

These immediate, direct results are 
the product of calculation. [trough 
their best general success has been 
with daytime t\. it is emphasized that 
the) are not tied to an) one formal 
ox time. 

Ili i — led, for example, to a 13-week 
participation last year in the first ol 
the \K»\I movies on k I T\ in Los 
Vngeles. Hie) fell the initial audience 
for these first-runs would warrant a 
departure from the daytime pattern. 

In an evening spot such a> that, live 

commercials are altered from the 

chart) tone of the early-morning show. 

"We keep the audience constantly in 
mind." Mrs. Johns points out. "and 
when we feel the) need a rest, Red just 
inserts a reminder, instead of doing a 

full-scale pitch or demonstration." 

"Local problems are also carefull) 
considered," she told sponsor. "Gen- 



erally, radio i- not used, unless a local 
manager requests it. We are quite 
flexible and geai i ampaigns to lot al 

needs and demand-. Bui u hen an 

S.( t.S. i "me-, from a brani h offi< e that 

a local \ci i- turning on the beat, 

mi fir — t thought i- radio -put- on a- 

much saturation a- i- available, sup- 
plemented b) daytime t\ participa- 
tions, ami supported b) special news- 
paper ad-. 

Thus, while the national budget 18 

fixed, the regional budget fluctuates. 

In addition to the 85' I For tv, five 
percent goes to newspapers, five per- 
cent to promotional materials, five per- 
cent to telephone 1 1 i i t-i toi ies. Radio 

mone) then come- from 1\ . 

Smalle) point- out that an) business 
using yellow pages "should give the 

same care and stud) to developing 
these ads as to an\ other, foi youi 

point of purchase is right there." 

Decrying the rising costs of night- 
time t\. Smalle) fear- thai his re- 
gional t\ will have to be curtailed next 
year. He anticipates putting up to 2t>' < 
of his budget into new-paper ads — 



an on rease oi I > • above thi 

"\\ •• have a stoi \ to tell about 
nu thods, he do lares, "which w 
onl) hint .it in a 20-second -poi. onl) 
pai i iall) tell in a demonstration. 

"In anj sei \ i< e business I ' 
admonishes, "the mosl important thing 
i- tin- cili-i live -ale of a produi t 
through advertising. Here i- where 
\ mi ( reate the impression of depend- 

ai ililv and ti u-l which i- absolutel) 

necessai \ , 

I. Mm \ an Lines, Inc., evolved in a 
pci iod of 35 to In \eai- from the fur- 
niture business of \\ . Parkei Lyon, 
one of tin- most culm ful . harai ters ol 

lli.- Southwest, who al-o founded the 

famed I'oin Express Museum. 

lli- -on. \\ . Parkei Lyon, Jr., is 
now a \ ice president in the compan) . 

I be i ompan) - ^<\ budget has in- 
creased in direct proportion to it- vol- 
ume. Jack Smalle) fondl) remembers 
I 1 ' ;'). when that budget was a men 
|20,000 less than a t.-nth of the pres- 
ent figure and he could purchase ti\- 
top local radio personalities ai ross the 
board during tin- <\.>\. all foi 1150.^ 



9» 



**; 



l as*. 



HABIT. . . 



Ov 



A practice first chosen, 

then followed so regularly il becomes second nature. 

GREN SEIBELS is one! He's WIS-TVs News Director- 
so consistently outstanding he's habit with hosts of 
viewers with whom WISP/ is synonymous with news 

Gren knows South Carolinians want wide coverage 
of local events, and furnishes big helpings. 
Result — tall ARB news ratings -in the 20's. 

WIS-TV is a good habit to form. 
Viewers know it- and so do advertisers. 
Sales soar when it's advertised on WIS-TV, 
and your PGW Colonel has evidence aplenty. 

WIS -TV- 10 

COLUMBIA, SOUTH CAROLINA 

C Richard Shafto, President 
Charles A. Batson, Managing Director . 

represented by 

PETERS, GRIFFIN. WOODWARD, INC. 



SPONSOR 



SEPTEMBER 1957 



l'» 




Retail sales in the 

La Crosse television 

market have 

increased nearly 

11 percent in the 

past year — 

almost triple 



1 


the rate of the 


1 

1 
1 
I 

I 


country as a whole.* 

*Sales Management 

Survey of 

Buyer Power, 

May '56, 

May '57. 


I 

1 
1 


WKBT 


1 

1 

1 


Serving 

130,000 
TV Homes 


1 


CBS -NBC -ABC 




Represented 

by: 

H-li TELEVISION, INC. 




HARRY HYETT, Minneapolis 


CHANNEL Q LA CROSSE, WIS. 




r. Sponsor 



Louis T. Hagopian: Detroit's young man 

I hese days you don't just pick a tv show, you pick a whole net- 
work lineup," says Lou Hagopian. 32-year-old advertising director 
of Plymouth. 

This year, Plymouth is sponsoring the Lawrence Welk Show, ABC 
TV, Mondays, Date with the Angels, ABC TV, Fridays and Climax, 
CBS TV, (entire program every fourth Friday) starting in June. 

**\ ou cant make a network buy these days on the basis of the 
program you're picking alone.'" he told sponsor. "You weigh the 
strength and weaknesses of an entire evening lineup, to see what 
kind of audience is likely to be brought to your show or tune in be- 
cause of the appeal of those following. We're sold on ABC's fall 
lineups. Friday, for instance, were preceded by Jim Bowie, Patrice 
Munsel and Sinatra and followed by Colt 45." 

Hagopian, who started at Chrysler Corp. in Dodge sales promotion 
under another "young man from Detroit," Jack Minor, now v.p. in 
charge of sales at Plymouth, currently heads up a staff of 40 people 
in Detroit, works with two agencies. N. W. Aver handles Plymouth 



50 




Working as team with v.p. Jack Minor. Hagopian plans ad strategy 



print, outdoor and radio advertising, which comprise 70' < of the 
multi-million budget and Crant Advertising handles Plymouth net- 
work television effort. 

'"Some 50' < of our over-all budget is still in newspapers." Hago- 
pian told sponsor. "This year, we won't be using spot tv. but 30% 
of the budget is in network. r>' i in spot radio. 10' "< in magazines and 
5'j in outdoor. Tv is the one medium that requires the most work 
and follow -through. For instance. Leonard Goldenson told me that 
ABC will be promoting the Fridav night lineup like mad. because 
the programing is so strong on a traditionally weak night. This 
promotion gives us a jumping off place for Date with the Angels." 



SPONSOR 



7 SEPTEMBER 1957 



Hagopian, a till, dark-haired ih.im with a heavy, athletic build, 
actual!) looks oldei than 32. "I 1 1-<< I to like this when I started 
out," he Bays. "If anyone had known nvj age -nine h\ c - yean ago, 
the) could jus I have brushed aside whal I said with 'Well, what do 
you expecl from a kid. I>iii now I m no longer anxious i" look 
older.' 

Pari reason for Hagopian s newl) Found vanit) is his young w i f«- 
(the) were married one and a hali years ago), daughtei "f Michi- 
gan s ex-( »o\ ri inn Kelly. 

"Win- jusl about typical <>f the group toward whom the bulk of 
..in advertising is aimed. From the 1955 model onward, with the 
modern restyling of our cars, weve realized thai we could and 
should appeal to the 20-to-39 age group, two "I oui network t\ 
-~(i « • w — arc aimed directl) at ihi~ younger crowd, while the othei one 
tends to ,^i\<' us ma— circulation in a market we had dominated 
previously. Advertising lia- lifted the car out of the wrong brand 
image which appealed to the 10-years and over consumers previ- 
ous!) . 

Three net i\ shows this year 
Since 1 ( ).~>.">. I'l\ mouth has continuous!) increased its network t\ 
effort, u es live commercials to gel across its advertising themes 
(e.g. "This spring everyone ha- Plymouth fever I. Live commer- 
cials, I'l\ imuit h feels, arc more persuasive and give the client a 

chance to make last-minute adjustments and changes in the cop) 
rather than being tied into a theme some -i\ months before it goes 
on the air. 

"l.i\e commercials are cheaper, of course, but we want to match 
the qualit) of film." sa\s Hagopian. "Therefore, in the case of Date. 
which is film, we kine the commercials about 10 days ahead. This 
still gives us a chance to make last-minute changes if essential."' 

Pl\ mouth commercials are directed at the family audience. "Men 
still have the decisive voice, but women pick color, upholstery, si\le. 
\lso women are ver\ important with the second-car market, and 
often decide ahout power and -leering too in those instances." 

Plymouth, which accounts for 55$ of the cars sold 1>\ Chrysler 
(Dodge, 2.V i I. actual!) competes with other levels of cars within 
the' corporation, hut like the other cars, it also benefits from Chrys- 
ler Corp. advertising efforts i e.g. Chrysler's Forward Look campaign 
on Climax through McCann-Erickson). 

"Top management at the sales level holds meetings ever) 1<> days 
to discuss policy, sa\s Hagopian. "The director- of advertising 
also meet periodicalK to find out ahout the corporate effort, hut I 
have no voice in the corporate advertising plans.' 

Hagopian has some strong views on the responsibilities of the 
Plymouth advertising agencies. 

"The agenc) is a function of management, he sa\s. "It should 
he full) informed b) the client, hut in turn, it should do a complete 
job of servicing the account with marketing research, motivational 
and consumer studies, \fter all. you cant plan advertising Btrateg) 
iti a vacuum. I he agenc) must know about styling, pricing, com- 
petitive dealer situations and so forth. The question is realK 
whether this information is to How strictl) in one direction from 
client to agency, or whether both must contribute to it. In the la-t 
couple of years, agencies have been required to do an increasing!) 
comprehensive job of marketing counsel and research." ^ 



WONDERFUL 
BUY!! 

GETS YOU ALL OF 




NEBRASKA 



KEIOIAND 



It takes five airlines and as many 
railroads to criss-cross huge, hus- 
tling KEL-O-LAND. It takes more 
than a million people to ring up 
its $1,220,150,000 annual retail 
soles. Yet Joe Floyd and his 101- 
man crew deliver all of KEL-O- 
LAND to you for your one wonder- 
ful single-market buy. 

PUT ALL KEL-O-LAND 
IN YOUR TV PICTURE! 

KDLO 3 

CHANNEL ~ ~ 



Aberdeen — Huron 

KELO 

Sioux Falls CHANNEL 



KPLO 

CHANNEL 
Pierro — Winner — Chamberlain 



. . . and KEL-O-LAND's 
new, big radio voice is 

KELO-AM 

KELO Radio's 1.032-Ft. Tower 
1 3,600- Watt Power. Eqv. 



General Offices Sioux Falls. S. D. 

JOE FLOYD, President 

Evans Nord. Cen Mgr Larry Bcnrson. V P 
Represented by H-R 



SPO\sOK 



SKPTEMBKK l').T, 



51 



TELEPULSE 



RATINGS: TOP SPOT! 



Rank Past" 
now rank 



Top 10 shows in 10 or more markets 
Period 8-16 July 1957 

TITLE. SYNDICATOR. SHOW TYPE 



Average 
ratings 



7-STATION 
MARKETS 



NY. LA. 



5-STA. 
MARKETS 



S. Fran. 



4-STATION MARKETS 



Boston Chicago Detroit Milw. Mnpls. 



Seattle- 
Tacoma Wash. 



3-STATION »,.», 



Bali 



1 ! 1 

i_ 

! 

2 4 

3 |4 
_J_ 

5 2 

6 9 

_l_ 
I 

7 I 3 

— I 

8 | 10 



Highway Patrol (M) 



19.3 



10.1 12.0 

wri .i h kttv 

7 00pm i in 



15.7 

kron h 

0:30pm 



11.5 13.5 23.7 14.2 12.9 12.7 22.1 14.9 

whz-tv wgn-tv wjbk-tv wtmj-tv kstp-tv wcau-tv komo-tv wtOP-tV 
Hi 30pm * nOpm 9:30pm 9:30pm 10:30pm 7:00pm 7:00pm 7:00pm 



13.0 14. | 

waga-tv wmtr t 
10:00pm 7:3] 



Sheriff of Cochise (W) 



17.1 



Men of Annapolis (A) 



16.5 



Silent- Service (A) 



16.4 



State Trooper (A) 



16.3 



San Francisco Beat (D) 



16.2 



10 



10 



CBS FILK 



Dr. Hudson's Secret Journal (D) 



15.4 



Dr. Christian (D) 



14.9 



Whirlybirds (A) 



14.7 



Frontier ( W) 

NBC 



14.6 



O. Henry Playhouse (D) 



GROSS KRASNE 



14.6 



4.7 10.7 

ualM kltv 

1 in 7:30pm 



6.2 9.9 

wabi iv knxt 
10:30pm 7:30pm 



6.2 11.9 

sua lv kltv 
: 00pm 7:30pm 



7.4 

khj-tv 

s llllpni 



2.9 13.4 

vvpix kttv 
S :30pm H 3 1 



5.1 10.9 

wabc-tt kttv 
10:30pm 7:30pm 



5.2 7.8 

wpix khj-tv 
7 :30pm 7 :30pm 



3.9 

wabd 
8:00pm 



6.3 

khj-tv 
8:30pm 



12.7 

kron-tv 

i; 311pm 



16.5 18.9 17.3 7.5 18.9 9.4 22.2 11.2 



wnac-tv wbbm-tv wwj-tv wtmj tv wrco-tv wcau-tv king-tv «Tc-tv wsb-t 



6:00pm 7:30pm 10:00pm 10:30pm 9:30pm 7:00pm 7:00pm 10:30pm 



16.0 

k|.l\ 
9:30pm 



8.7 18.5 10.2 14.2 10.7 10.7 

wgn-tv wjbk-tv wisn-tv wcco-tv komo-tv vvtop-tv 

9:30pm 10:00pm 9:00pm 4:00pm 9:00pm 7:00pm 



15.7 

krnn-tv 
7:00pm 



12.5 11.5 

wbZ-tV V\!lh(|-tV 

7:0Opm 9:30pm 



21.0 11.2 

king-tv wtop-tv 
7:30pm 10:30pm 



11.2 

kpix 

7 »lii 



20.2 

wnac-tv 
10:30pm 


14.5 

wnbq-tv 
9:30pm 


13.9 

wtmj-tv 
9 :30pm 


14.2 11.0 

kstp-tv wrcv-tv 
9:30pm 10:30pm 



13.2 

kpix 
10:30pm 



11.2 13.2 11.2 

wnac-tv wgn-tv wjbk-tv 
11:15pm 9:30pm 10:30pm 



12.7 

wcau-tv 
7 :00pm 



12.4 

kpix 
10:00pm 



19.2 10.2 11.5 16.5 11.4 

wnac-tv wnbq-tv wxyz-tv wtmj-tv kstp-tv 
10:30pm 10:00pm 10:30pm 8:00pm 7:30pm 



12.9 

kgo-tv 
7:00pm 



14.2 5.2 18.2 11.3 



wnac-tv 
4:00pm 



wgn-tv 

'.' : in 



wjbk-tv 
10:00pm 



wtmj-tv 
10:00pm 



9.6 

king-tv 
5:30pm 



11.5 

kron-tv 
K :30pm 



11.2 11.5 13.9 

wgn-tv wwj-tv wtmj-tv 
9:00pm 10:30pm 9:30pm 



9.9 18.7 

wcau-tv king-tv 
7:00pm 8:30pm 



9.2 

kgo-tv 
10:00pm 



10.5 

wwj-tv 
10:30pm 



17.1 

ktnt-tv 
S :30pm 



13.5 

kpix 



3.9 11.2 20.2 10.1 

cklw tv kstp-tv wcau-tv ktnt-tv 

10:30pm !":30pm 10:3iipni 10:30pm 



15.9 16. 



10:00pm 10:30I| 



13.2 19. 

waga-tv wmar 
10:00pm 10:30 



13. 

wbal 
10:30) 



15.0 

waga-tv 
10:00pm 



12.5 

mb n 
10:00pm 



16.5 

wsb-tv 
9 :30pm 



wba I 

10:3 



17.3 7.1 



wsb-tv wma 
9:30pm 11:0 



Rank PasT 
now rank 



Top 10 shows in 4 to 9 markets 



1 3 

2 I 
3 



Esso Colden Playhouse (D) 



OFFICIAL FILN 



Whistler (M) 



I Search For Adventure (A) 



GEO. BAGNALL 



4 5 

5 I 2 
6 



Frontier Doctor (W) 

HOLLYWOOD TV SERVICE 



Crusader (A) 



Falcon (M) 



Code 3 (A) 



ABC Ft LM 



8 7 



Kingdom of the Sea (Doc) 



9 8 



Cisco Kid (W) 



Mr. District Attorney (M) 



17.4 



16.8 



14.8 



14.5 



13.5 



12.1 



11.8 



11.5 



11.0 



11.0 



2.2 

kabc-tv 

6 '» 



10.0 

kri'P 

7:00pm 



6.9 

km 
9 :00pm 



3.1 

wor-tt 
9:00pm 



8.1 8.2 

wrca i\ kttv 
10:30pm 7 pm 



8.4 

kcop 

" 30pm 



10.2 



18.5 

kpix 
7 :30pm 



13.0 

kron-tv 
'.'::: n 



14.4 

kron-tv 

7 llltpm 



10.7 

kn n ii 
6 :30pm 



13.9 

wbz-tv 
7:00pm 



18.0 

wcau-tv 
10:30pm 



8.5 

«rc-tv 
10:30pra 



11.2 


11.9 


5.5 


wwj-tv 
9 :30pm 


wxix-tv 
10:00pm 


wttg-tv 
7:30pm 



9.0 

witi-tv 
9 :30pm 



6.3 



:00pm 



11.4 



12 

um 









wxix-tv 

10:00pm 








10.2 

wnac-tv 
II L5pm 




8.2 

IVU J - t V 

9:30pm 






6.0 

kstp-tv 

10:30pm 






21.5 

wnac-tt 

8: mi 




45 

cklw-tv 
10:30pm 










9.5 

wttg-tv 
S :00pm 




5.7 

wbkb-tv 
9 30pm 








17.5 

wtcn-tv 
9:30pm 


15.3 

king-tv 
10:00pm 


10.2 

wtop-tv 

7:00pm 






13.5 

wjbk-tv 
in 30pm 








11.1 

komo-tv 

9:30pm 






8.2 

wgn-tv 

6 :00pm 


9.5 

WW/ tv 










8.4 

n top-l v 

6:00pm 



9.7 

u nac-tv 
11 15pm 



11.5 

wjbk-tv 

10:30pm 



10.9 

kstp-tv 

10:30pm 



15.0 

waga-tv 
10:00pm 



11.5 1 

waga-tv wr 

5:30pm 7:'| 



11 ' 



Utoow type symbols: (A) adventure: (C) comedy: (D) drama: (Doc) documentary: (K) kids: (M) 
myitary; (Mu) musical; (S) sport; (SF) Science Fiction; (Wl Western. Films listed are syn- 
dicated. ^ hr. . *? hr. & hr. length, telecast In four or more markets. *nie average rating Is 
a> unweighted average of Individual market ratings listed above. Blank space Indicates film 



not broadcast in this market 3-10 June. While network shows are fairly stable fro J 
month to another In the markets In which they are shown, this Is true to much lesser erteil-l 
syndicated shows. Tliii should be borne in mind when analyzing rating trends from one mi'* 
another In this chart. 'Refers to last month's chart. If blank, show was not rated at all 1* 



LM SHOWS 



MM 



ION MARKETS 



'..9 2 



>5 20. J 11.4 

* l\ v-bni tl 

lOpa] pin to 



5 



Celumbui St. L. 



18.7 



2STATION MARKETS 
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10:00pm 



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27.3 



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tn other tnan lop 10. Cla»slflr»tlon u to number of itiltotu In 
ulse i own. Pulie determines number by measuring which lUUnni 
received bv hornet In the metropolitan ixei of i riven market 
•UUon itielf may be outilde metropolitan arte of the market 



Why, Oh Why, Smidley! 





I've searched high and low and -till no \ >-< ad< 
order here, fust don't feel we could use one of the 
nation's targes! television markets, eh, Smidlev? 
Win iii _'n years, ilii- < ascade markel has rained 
millions oi acres "t new Farms, billions of dollars in 
new industry and thousands ol new families. \ ■■• I 
still, Cascade rdevision alone serves the entire re- 
gion. The biggesl single buj in the Wesl and you 
missed it .lu.iin. Smidlev. For -Ii.hu>-. Smidli v! 




O CASCADE 

^ a ™ BROADCASTING COMPANY 



NATIONAL REP.: WEED TELEVISION 



PACIFIC NORTHWEST: MOORE & ASSOCIATES 



53 




WYDE in BIRMINGHAM 
WILD in E 



N 



call letters 
W Bartell stations 
programming 



ia>«j AtyAedettted ' 0u 



ADAM YOUNG INC. 

New York • Chicago • St. Louis • Los Angeles • San Francisco 



-.1 



SPONSOR • 7 SEPTEMBER 1957 






/ ii >■>■/. I\ listing o) > han 
in the advertising and broadcast field 



NEW AND RENEW 



ADVERTISING AGENCY PERSONNEL CHANGES 



NAME 



FORMER AFFILIATION 



Inez Aimce BBDOO. NY. Supvsr radio-tv dcpt 

William M Baldwin Baldwin. Bowers & Strachan. Buffalo, chairman of the board 

John F Belcher 

C.lt.lhn.l Swimwcar ,iss» publicity dir 



Nancy Beyer 
Tony Cost.inzo 
Florence Cruzen 
Sherman K Ellis 



Upholstery Leather Croup, automotive public rcl's dir 
Hclcne Curtis, personnel dir 
McCann-Enckson. LA. creative consultant 
Emmctt Bates Faison Benton & Bowles. NY. acct exec 



Thomas C. Fielder 
William | Cillil.tn 
lames H Craham 
Hovey Hagcrman 
Colin H |ohn 
Paul Kennedy. Jr 
Carroll McKenn.i 
Robert Milford 
William M Russack 
Philip H. Sch.itt |r. 
Ralph C. Tanner 



Ccncral Electric. advtg & sis prom mgr 
Ketchum, MacLcad & Crovc. Pittsburgh, acct supvsr 
McManus, John & Adams. NY. asst acct exec 
McManus. |ohn & Adams. NY. sr vp & acct exec 
McManus. John & Adams, NY. acct mgr 



William Esty. NY 
Shallcr-Rubin. NY. creative dir 
Leo Burnett. NY. brand supvsr 
Anderson & Cairns. NY. vp & dir 



NEW AFFILIATION 

Same, radio tv timebuyer 

Rumrill Co Buffalo member of board of dir s 

Cunningham Walsh NY m< rchandising co ordinator 

Crant NY beauty & fashion coordinator 

Crant. NY. public rcls acct exec 

Geoffrey Wade. Chi. media budget asst 

Same, chairman of plans board 

H B Humphrey. Alley & Richards NY acct . . 

Cunningham & Walsh NY marketing & merchandising supvsr 

Same, marketing dir 

Same acct exec 

Same, acct supvsr 

Same asso acct exec 

Edward Petry LA tv acct exec 

Edward Petry LA radio acct exec 

Kudncr. NY. tv prod dir 

Same, vp 

Same, vp 

Same, chairman of creative board 



STATION CHANGES 



KIRO-TV. Seattle, will become a primary affiliate of CBS effective 
8 February 1958 

KLLL. Lubbock. Texas, and WTOO. Toledo. Ohio, arc now affiliated 
with MBS 

KOAT-TV. Albuquerque. New Mexico, has appointed the Boiling Co. 
as national rep 

KREM Broadcasting Co. Spokane, new company formed by King Broad- 
casting. Seattle, to acquire all physical assets of KREM-TV and KREM- 
AM and FM. Spokane 



Shasta Telecasting iKVIP-TVi has appointed Ccorgc P Hollingbery 
Co rep 

WINR-TV. uhf unit in Binghamton. NY. will become an NBC optional 
affiliate 1 October 

W|QS. (ackson. Mississippi, has appointed the Branham Co NY, ex- 
clusive advertising rep 

WKAB, Mobile. Ala. has been bought by Ccorge and John Hopkinson 
and Quentin Sturm, all of Chicago 

WKST-TV. Youngstown. Ohio-New Castle. Pa. will become a primary 
affiliate of ABC in October 



NEW FIRMS, NEW OFFICES (Change of address) 



Advertising Agencies. Inc. has opened a NY office at 509 Madison Ave 
8eckman. Hamilton & Asso and Edwards Agcy have merged to form 

Beckman Koblitz. Inc. with offices at 915 N La Ciencga Blvd. LA 
Bcnnet-Chaikin. Inc. has expanded operations and has taken the fifth 

floor of 574 Fifth Ave. NY 
John Blair & Co and Blair-TV have moved their Boston offices to 118 

Newbury St 

Julian Brightman Co. Boston, has moved to new offices in the Fensgatc 
Hotel, 534 Beacon St 

CBS Radio Spot Sales has opened a new branch office in St. Louis at 
Ninth and Sidney Sts 

Devney Inc. stn reps, has opened new offices in LA at 612 South Serrano 
Ave. and in Boston at 419 Boylston St 

Geare-Marston. Phila office of Ruthrauff & Ryan, has moved to new 
quarters at 3 Penn Center 

Henry Ccrstenkorn Co has merged with Neale Advtg Asso, La 

Courfain-Cobb & Asso and R M. Loeff. Inc. have merged to form Cour- 
fam-Locff. Inc. with offices at 205 W Wackcr Or. Chi 

Crcy Advtg has opened a regional office in the Russ Bldg. 235 Mont- 
gomery. SF 

H-R Representatives. Inc. and H-R Television. Inc. have opened a Detroit 

office at 1065 Penobscot Bldg 
Lawrence Kane. Inc. and Artley Advtg have merged to form Lawrence 

Kane £> Artley with offices at 10 E 52nd St. NY 
KCLA-FM. new fm radio station serving greater LA and Orange Counties 
Edward Kletter and Franklin Bruck have merged to form Parkson Advtg 

Agcy. Inc. 400 Park Ave. NY 
KPAC-TV new full-time, network-color station for the Beaumont-Port 

Arthur Texas area, plans to be in operation 15 Sept: is affiliated with 

NBC: will be represented for ntl sales by Paul H. Raymer Co. Inc 
KVIP. Redding, new 540 kc radio stn plans to start operations in early 

October 
Phyllis Lacey Advtg. Tampa. Fla. has expanded into a corporation to be 

known as Lacey and Patterson. Inc 
Cye Landy Advtg. Columbus. Ohio, has moved to larger quarters at 929 

E Broad St 



Mottl & Siteman Advtg has moved to new quarters in the Buckeye Bldg 
291 S La Ciencga Blvd. LA 

Samuel N Ncmcr has formed the Ncmcr Advtg Agcy Inc with offices 
at 5925 Highway 7. Minneapolis 

Robert W. Orr Asso Inc Division of Fuller & Smith & Ross has moved to 
the FSR offices at 230 Park Ave. NY 

Hal Phillips and Asso has established LA offices in coniunction with Neale 
Advtg Asso. 8462 Sunset Blvd 

Pintoff-Lawrcncc Productions. NY. has moved to new quarters at 64 E 
55th St 

Charles O. Puffer Company. Chi has moved to new quarters in the MCA 
Bldg. 430 N Michigan Ave 

Radio TV Reps. Inc. has opened a Boston office to operate under the 
name of Foster & Creed with headquarters at 414 Statlcr Office Bldg 
It has also opened a Seattle-Portland office 

Radow Advtg. Columbus. Ohio, has become a partnership and now oper- 
ates under the name of Radow Alpcrs Advtg 

Adam Reinemund Advtg. new agency with offices at 2207 N 56th St. 

Omaha 
William |. Riley. Inc, new stn rep firm with offices at 55 E Washington 

St Chi 
Martin | Simmons Advtg and Stern. Walters & |astcr. Inc. have merged 

to form Stern Walters & Simmons. Inc. with new quarters at 155 E 

Ohio St. Chi 
Sparton Brdcstg. owner of tv stn WWTV, has opened new executive 

offices in the Arcade Bldg. 417 N Mitchell St. Cadillac Michigan 
Transfilm Inc has opened a midwc*' division with headquarters at The 

Carlton House. Pittsburgh 
WFCA-TV Jacksonville, new tv stn, started operations 1 Sept 
WKST. Inc. New Castle. Penn. plans to move its general offices to the 

First Federal Plaza, on or about 1 Oct 
WPTA. new Fort Wayne tv station, plans to go on the air 21 Sept 
WWL-TV. New Orleans, new vhf station expects to begin operations in 

September: will be a CBS-TV affiliate 



SPONSOR 



SEPTEMBER 195' 



SPONSOR ASKS 



What new trends should sponsors be 

aware of in transcribed radio programing 





Ben Philley, general manager, Frederick 

IF . Zix Co., New York 
In in\ trips around the countrj in 
recent weeks. I have noticed a definite 
increase of interest on the part of ad- 
\ertisers in good, sound radio pro- 
graming. Obviously, one of the out- 
standing reasons for this is the recent 
publicity regarding the disk jockey 
and the type of music being "forced"' 
on the public. Main adsertisers are 
questioning the value of their spots 



"proof of 
the pudding 
is in the 
eating" 



when placed next to any of the "top 
10" or "top forty." Also, with most 
advertisers trying to crowd into cer- 
tain time segments on stations, and 
with the increasing difficulty therefore 
in allowing ample spacing between 
competitive products — most advertisers 
are beginning to question the value of 
these particular time segments. All of 
tli is. of course, is leading advertisers 
hack to good programs, because they 
know that no competitor can be within 
their allotted time period, and that 
they have more than one opportunity 
to convince their audience of the value 
of their product and /or service. 

It had been a long time since a spon- 
sor had purchased a five half-hour 
strip, either day or night, but Fischer 
Bros. Supermarkets in Cleveland 
bought Fred Waring and his PennsyU 
vanians on a five half-hour strip for 
not only Cleveland, but most of the 
markets in the northern Ohio region. 
Fairway Foods also bought Fred War- 
ing on a five a week half-hour basis 
for Minneapolis-St. Paul. These are 
just two examples of sponsors that be- 
lieve in good, sound radio programing. 



and since Fischer Foods was a pur- 
chaser of a five half-hour strip of Red 
Skelton just a few years ago, and have 
now purchased Fred Waring on the 
same basis — it seems to me that "the 
proof of the pudding is in the eating" 
has been proved! 

Certainly. 1 am in accord with one 
of your recent articles that some smart 
regional or national advertiser is going 
to purchase nighttime radio program- 
ing — and the rush will be on! Be- 
cause, dollar for dollar, there is no bet- 
ter advertising buy than good, sound 
radio da\ or night! 

Charles Michelson, president, Charles 

Wichelson, Inc., New York 
We in the industry hear from all sides 
about the resurgence of radio as an 
excellent advertising medium. These 
remarks are also backed up with sur- 
vey facts to bear out this contention. 
Despite all of this, however, a person 
on the listening end of radio detects a 
lack of overall tangible programing 
planning. It is this single factor that 
makes all the surveys appear a bit 
green around the edges. News, music 
and sports, interspersed with an over- 
dose of double and triple spotted jin- 
gles, have been practically the sole 
programing material on well over 70' i 
of our U.S.A. radio stations for the 
past number of years. The fact that 
these same songs, same news reports 



"a lack of 
overall 
tangible 
programing' 



and same sports results are heard on 
so many stations detract from any in- 
dividuality a radio station may have 
established for itself at one time. 

Like the early morning sun that 




casts a shaft of bright light, we are 
pleased to report that a new trend in 
radio programing is beginning to ap- 
pear on the horizons. Here and there, 
stations in wider) separated areas have 
been scheduling blocks of half-hour 
mystery and drama programs, the tvpe 
that were once so popular in the hey- 
day of radio. 

Specificalh . in Washington, D. C, 
one key 50.000-watt network outlet has 
for a time set Thursday night apart, 
from eight till midnight, for a con- 
tinual drama and mystery evening. 

In Detroit and other kev network 
markets stations have for the past six 
months scheduled our eeriest mysteries 
in the 12 to 1 a.m. period, and sur- 
prisingly enough, have sold a full spot 
schedule therein. Small independent 
stations, such as in Pendleton, Oregon, 
Harrisburg, Pennsylvania and a lim- 
ited number of others, are turning 
their prime evening hours of 8 to 10 
p.m. into drama periods. Each of 
these stations, which now number on 
our books 42. reports that in the main 
their availabilities as well as adjacen- 
cies are in considerable demand. 

It is our opinion that with this nu- 
cleus a new trend is in the making in 
radio station programing and one 
which advertisers would do well to 
watch carefully. 

The make-up of the average drama 
mystery schedule includes such well- 
knowns as Famous Jury Trials, Sher- 
lock Holmes and The Clock. 

Harry S. Coodman, president, Harry S. 

Goodman Productions, New York 
Too much of a good thing. That's the 
stor\ of today's radio. The music-and- 
news format saved radio after tv"s on- 
slaught but many stations lost their 
individuality as a result of following 
the leaders. Also lost was a large seg- 
ment of audience — the people who do 
not want to listen to music-and-news 
dav and night, and who. after the 
blush of newness has worn off. have 



:■>(, 



SPONSOR 



7 SEPTEMBER 1957 





when you can bet on a sure thing . . . 

and the surest thing in TV today is 






^or/offe. He I 

45.8 t » .---- 

" /•„!.! mhus, 0. 



t 




Columbus, 



Of 



it in 



Cochise 



I *.<*'%$. '26.9 \*?\ 

\ 56.3 ^7, 



Cleveland, 0. | fcA* # 

24.9 > 







Here's how 

the ratings rolled 

In market after market: 




So successful is this great adventure series produced 
for NTA by Desilu that 39 New episodes are now being made! 



NATIONAL TELEFILM ASSOCIATES, INC. 

60 W. 55th STREET • NEW YORK 19, N. Y. . PHONE PLAZA 7-2100 

Harold Goldman, vice president in charge of sales 




found that tv lea\cs ao room for 
imagination. 

Some 40 radio stations have brought 
hack a pattern of programing, proved 
popular in the "good old days" of 
radio, that is eminently successful to- 
day. Stations such as W HUM. Chi- 
cago; WCU. Philadelphia. WTOP. 
Washington; WEEI, Boston; KALL. 
Salt Lake Cit\ have scheduled our 
dramatic half-hour programs in eve- 
ning slots. They run Monday through 
Friday, as much as two hours a night. 

Such stations stand alone in their 
cities. People who want to use their 
imaginations, who want to he gripped 
in exciting and suspenseful stories 
listen to them. There's a lot of such 
people. The ratings show it land so 
do the renewals.) 

The demand for this t\ pe of pro- 
graming has been so great that we 
have produced an average of more 



"people who 
want to 
use their 
imagination" 



than five different half-hour shows 
each vear since 1951. Each show con- 
sists of 52 or more complete programs. 

Though our sales have been confined 
to radio stations, advertising agencies 
and clients are now showing interest 
in this type of programing. It costs 
less to schedule a half-hour program 
five days a week in evening time than 
a few daytime radio spots, or even 
a couple of tv spots. Stations using 
our mystery-adventure block program- 
ing show average ratings of 3.5 
I Pulse I . In a weeks period, a spon- 
sor gets at least 25 exposures ( three 
one-minute commercials plus an open- 
ing and closing per show I and more 
important, sponsor identification. The 
strip is known as Clients Mystery I or 
Adventure i Hour and is so publicized 
and merchandised through other ad- 
vertising media, including point-of-sale 
displa\ s. 

We can suppl) over 40 half-hour 
shows, most of them produced recently. 
W e believe that within the next few 
months, many local, regional and na- 
tional spot advertisers will be sponsor- 
ing these dramatic shows in half-hour 
evening strips. ^ 



58 




® 



WnfLWW'W MAXIMUM POWER MAXIMUM TOWER 

newest member of the famous Crosley g) 

Sales Offices: New York, Cincinnati, Chicago Sales Representatives: NBC Spot! 
Detroit, Los Angeles, San Francisco — Bomar Lowrance & Associates, Inc., Charlotte, Atlanta, t 



Full ABC Network Affiliation • Crosley Broadcasting Corporation, a division of 



Av 



SPONSOR • . SEPTEMBER 1957 






Why J. Walter Thompson Timebuyer Selects 



Crosley WLW Stations for Ward Baking C 



"WLW Stations do more than just take 
your time dollars. Their staff of 
merchandising-promotion experts work rij 
along with the advertiser's sales people 
and follow through with trade contacts — 
buyers, brokers, distributors, store managers, 
Yes. I'd sure say that the WLW Stations offer 
Tip-Top service everytime. all the time!" 



V<Z^ttA<lJ<Jfl 



Mario Kircher, J. Walter Thompson Timebuyer 




Like J. Walter Thompson, you'll get top service for your products on the 
WLW Stations. So before you buy, always check first with your WLW Stations' 
Representative. You'll be glad you did! 






WLW 

Radio 



WLW-T 

Cincinnati 



WLW-C 

Columbus 



WLW 

Dayton 



WLW-A 

Atlanta 



Network Affiliations: NBC: ABC; MBS Sales Offices: New York. Cincinnati. Chicago 

Sales Representatives: NBC Spot Sales: Detroit. Los Angeles. San Francisco 

Bomar Lowrance & Associates. Inc.. Charlotte. Atlanta. Dallas Crosley Broadcastm. Cor- oration, a division of 



SPONSOR • | SEPTEMBER 195*3 



59 



abc-tv checks into 



MIAMI 



. . . adding its 73rd 
live station 
and boosting coverage 
to 92.6%* 



Bag and baggage, we've moved into Miami 
- on spanking-new WPST-TV, Channel 10. 
And not as seasonal visitors. We've come to 
stay. 

From its August 1st air date, WPST-TV 
has been a full-time ABC-TV affiliate. Now 
all Miami can see all ABC-TV shows — as 
scheduled and programmed. 

Now all ABC-TV advertisers are assured 
of live, competitive access to the nation's 
17th market and its $2 billion buying power. 

Affiliating with WPST-TV raises ABC's 
live coverage to 77.9% of all U.S. television 
homes. Coming: live, competitive ABC-TV 
affiliates, this season in Norfolk, Indianapo- 
lis, New Orleans, Omaha, Youngstown, 
Boston, Amarillo, Peoria, Pittsburgh. These 
push our live coverage to a thumping 85%. 

If you're not fully checked out on the bur- 
geoning, live ABC-TV coverage story, you 
should be. Now. 



Q 



■X- Total coverage for average half-hour evening program. More than 84% of this is live! 




60 



SPONSOR 



SEPTEMBER 1951 



Reports unit evaluates news, trends, 
opinions \<<< film buyers and tellers 



FILM-SCOPE 



7 September Thli was the big week for Edsel the first new brand in ages, and the first new 

Cyrl.ht 1957 ,;;,, J\iXt» job fol L9S8. 

SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. .,,,,,,, .... . , , . . . . ,. 

And although the dealer setup -till IS trying Id tind its sea legs, Interest m huiili- 

cated film in beginning to emerge. In Louisville, Edsel dealer Thurston Cooke signed 
n|i NBCs Silent Service for telecast on WAVE-TV^ Previous!) the Edsel dealer in 

Cleveland took on Victory at Sea via \YJ\Y-T\. 



In the air communications business, history can play strange tricks on your mem* 
ory. For more than three decades the word "network" has been synonymous 

with the word "live." 

Erase your mental slate. This week it was plain that the word "network" more 
and more is being equated with the word "can." 
This is why: 

• 44 new weekly network shows have been sold thus far foi the L957-58 network 
Beason, plus 1 bi-weekly (Jack Benny alternate) and 1 month!) (Desilu). 

• Of the 44 sponsored weeklies, 30 V£ programs arc film (you net a *''_■ figure in 
the calculations, because sometimes shows are ' j live and ' -j film). The bi-wcckly and 
the monthly newcomers both are film. 

• Going a step farther, you can take those 30% film programs and split them up bj 
Ij pes thus: 

PROGRAM M MBER 

Crime and mystery .'!'•_■ 

Western 8 

Comedy 6 

Adventure 3 

Drama 3 

Documentary 1 

Variety-drama combination 1 

• I!\ ua\ of contrast : Among the 13':> new weekly live show-. ]u are variety, 3 are 
quiz-audience participation, and 1 ^ crime-mystery. 



How did the networks and sponsors latch onto the coming fall's film fare? li- 
the obvious answer: 

Via pilots. 

Of the 30 1 , •> new network sponsored film programs, 22 had advance samples. 

The next question, of course, is whether the producer-" guesses on pilot produc- 
tion matched up with what they actually sold. Here's the answer: 

TYPE PILOTS PRODI ' I D -now - SOLD 

Comedies 28(26%) 6(27%) 

Crime-mystery 21 I L9$ > 6 (27 

Action-adventure 21 (19$ I 

Western 16(15%) 7 (32$ I 

Drama 11(10%) I 5%) 

Musicals 5 (5%) 

\nthology L (4%) 

Miscellaneous 2 l 2' '< | 

TOTAL 108(100 22(100%) 



SPONSOR • 7 SEPTEMBER 1957 



61 



FILM-SCOPE continued 



Additional notes on the 1957-58 pilot situation: 

1) About the only kind of fare that ran be sold without a pilot is name fare. 

Westerns, mysteries, etc., can't. 

2) Of 108 new pilots, 13 were produced outside the continental limits of 
the U.S. 

3) The networks participated financially in the production of 30 of the 
108 pilots— CBS to the tune of 16; ABC, 10; and NBC, 4. 

Despite the impressive statistical record of pilots as sales tools, film people still hope 
they can dodge the expense of true samples and get by with 10-minute presen- 
tation films. 

No matter how you slice it, costs are going up, and every nickel counts. For instance: 
Today, the five-day working week is a union rule. Result: You either incur 
overtime or extend production schedules — both alternatives being more costly. 

It's not the pilots alone that are causing cost headaches. Syndicators and packag- 
ers are beset by new expenses with every move they make. 

Re-run payments to actors are another item you can add to the five-day-week rule 
(see above). This is the before-and-after picture: 

BEFORE: Until last year, SAG members started collecting extra payments only with 
the third run of a syndicated series. The schedule called for 50% of original earnings on 
third and fourth runs combined; 25% on the fifth run; and 25% on the seventh — for a 
total of 100% extra. 

NOW: The rule is 35% on second runs; 30% on third; and 25% on additional runs 
— for a total that soon can top 100 by a goodly amount. 

Jake McKeever, NBC TV Films' v.p., this week used his company's sales progress 
with The Silent Service as a springboard for a statistical recital of the stature achieved 
by syndicated film. 

One of his statistical citations: 

PERIOD TOTAL SYNDICATE HOURS % INCREASE 

January-May 1956 289^2 

January-May 1957 882% 350% 

Source: ARB. 

ARB's third consecutive telephone survey of tv viewers in Los Angeles to deter- 
mine the popularity of features on tv revealed overwhelming acceptance for movies. 

To the question "Do you or any other member of your family ever watch movies 
programs on tv?" 91.6% said "yes" (last year's count w r as 88.4%). 

FLASHES FROM THE FIELD: Harry McWilliams, formerly with Screen Gems, 
is currently in New York lining up film shows for distribution in Mexico, Central and South 
America and the Caribbeans. McWilliams reports seven new tv stations in seven sepa- 
rate markets opening up this year in Mexico alone. . . . KETV, Omaha, scheduled to 
start telecasting 17 September, has signed Boots 'n Saddles, Crunch & Des, Kit Carson, 
Gray Ghost and Victory at Sea — all except Victory at Sea are first run. . . . NTA reports 
the Sheriff of Cochise sold in 70 markets. . . . Henry White named Director of Program 
Procurement for Screen Gems, is on the prowl for top producers, directors, writers and ac- 
tors. . . . George Bilson has joined NTA as producer-director of the new George Jessel's 
Show Business series. 

62 SPONSOR • 7 SEPTEMBER 1957 



Li 




GEE! ih 



at's the car for me!" 



He was watching WGN-TV where top programming has a way 
of getting viewers interested and absorbed. He was part of a 
722. 700- person audience delivered by the 10 o'clock movie i May 
1957 Nielsen, 17.1' | . 

Top programming week after week lets WGN-TV offer you the 
kind of audience you want to reach — morning, noon and night. 

That's why Top Drawer Advertisers use WGN-TV 

Let our specialists fill you in on some exciting WGN-TV case histories, dis- 
cuss your sales problems and advise you on current availabilities. 



Put "GEE!" in your Chicago sales with 



WGN-TV 



CHANNEL 9-CHICAGO 



SPONSOR 



7 SEPTEMBER 1957 



63 




SELL IN 
ST. LOUIS 

The only way to reach 
this vast Country and 
ff estern market 





770 
KILO 



1000 WATTS 
CLEAR CHANNEL 



Represented 

by 

THE BOLLING 

k COMPANY 1 




PADUCAH, KENTUCKY 



570 KILOCYCLES 

SERVING 

5 
STATES 

WEST 

KENTUCKY'S 

MOST 

POWERFUL 

STATION 

Represented by the 
JOHN E. PEARSON CO. 




National and regional spot buys 
in work now or recently completed 



SPOT BUYS 



64 



TV BUYS 

Ronson Corp., Newark. N. J., plans a campaign for its electric 
shavers. The 52-week schedule will hegin 23 September. Participa- 
tions are being sought in news, weather and sports programs, to 
reach a male audience. Buying is not completed. Buyer: Helen 
Wilbur. Agency: Grev Advertising Agencv. New York. (Agency 
declined to comment. ) 

The Frenchette Co., New York, is going into major markets to 
promote its salad dressings. Schelule will start 30 September for 
eight weeks. Minutes and chainbreaks during both daytime and 
nighttime segments are sought. Average frequency: five per week 
per market. Buying is not completed. Buyer: Mann) Klein. Ageru \ : 
Cohen & Aleshire, New York. 

National Biscuit Co., New York, is entering top markets for its 
Shredded Wheat and Rice Honeys cereals. Minute participations in 
children's shows are being used, schedule kicks-off shortly for 13 
weeks. Buyer: Desmond O'Neill. Agency: Kenyon & Eckhardt. 
New York. 

Anahist Co. (owned by Warner-Lambert l . Yonkers, N. Y., is buy- 
ing heavy schedules in 130 markets. Campaign will kick-off 16 
September for 26 weeks. Minutes will be placed during both day- 
time and nighttime segments; frequency will depend upon the mar- 
ket. Buying is not completed. Buyer: Chet Slaybaugh. Agenc\ : 
Ted Bates & Co., New York. ( Agencv declined to comment. I 

Colgate-Palmolive Co., New York, is preparing a schedule in 
major markets for its Ad detergent. Campaign will start 15 Sep- 
tember and will run until the end of the year. Minute announce- 
ments during daytime segments will be purchased; frequency: four 
to 10 per week in each market. Buying is not completed. Bu\er: 
Sallv Revnolds. Agency : Lennen & Newell, New York. 



RADIO BUYS 

Harold F. Ritchie, Inc., Clifton, N. J., is going into scattered mar- 
kets for its Scott's Emulsion; 20-week campaign will begin shortly. 
Minutes and some chainbreaks will be slotted. Average frequency: 
15-20 per week per market. Buyer: Mario Kircher. Agency: J. 
Walter Thompson Co., New York. 

Pepperidge Farm, Inc., Norwalk. Conn., is planning a schedule in 
major markets for its breads. Schedule begins in September for 26 
weeks. Minute announcements will l>e placed 7:00 to 12:00 noon. 
Monday through Friday. Buyer: Frank Gianattasio. Agency: 
Ogilvy. Benson & Mather. New York. 



SPONSOR 



7 SEPTEMBER 1957 



•t •'• 



This way to Montreal 



rim 









*•'..'*. 




• i 


.'/'-■ 
V'* E j », 




1 


• ,4, i^w^ 


► ''"■^VflrH 


fol 




Coming or Going 
KBTY is leader 
in DENVER TV 

Whether you are just moving into the Denver 
market, or already going "great guns" here, 
you need Channel 9 because KBTV is FIRST 
in Denver when and where it counts the most! 



T WT 




KBTV first* in quarter-hour 
leads (by more than one rating 
point), between sign-on** and 
10:00 p.m., Monday through Fri- 
day. 

KBTV leads* during the same 
time period in "share of audi- 
ence". 

KBTV occupies* 4 of the 5 

top spots in the cumulative rat- 
ings of 21 locally produced pro- 
grams. 



KBTV first in Denver for pro- 
motion, with solid, successful mer- 
chandising cooperation for its 
advertisers and, most important, 
SALES RESULTS! 

Call your P.W.G. Colonel today. 

Buy the station in the rich Denver 
market that delivers People and 
PURSES . . . Impacts and RE- 
SULTS! 



z 



•KBTV sign-on 10:30 a.m. 

*ARB Denver Survey 
-May, 1957 

i Quarter-hour leads 

iPercentage of audienc 



Write, wire or Phone KBTV or Peters, Griffin, 
Woodward, Inc. 

KBTV ch9nne| 9 



DENVER, COLORADO 
ULI 
President 



JOHN C. MULLINS /""| JOSEPH HEROLD 

^^ Stotion Manager 



News and Idea 
WRAP-UP 



ADVERTISERS 

Hallmark Cards, Kansas City, is 
planning its biggest pre-Christmas 
ad campaign which will he cli- 
maxed with a special holiday show 
on its Hall of Fame NBC TV se- 
ries. 

Six 90-minute network tv dramatic 
shows this coming season will be sup- 
plemented with seven major consumer 
magazines and newspapers in 125 
metro markets. 

The new ad budget of Tintex has 
been upped 30% as a result of "a 
sales spurt"' which followed the de- 
but of the home dye on network tv 
last spring. So says Fred Q. Swack- 
hamer, director of advertising for 
Park & Tilfords toiletries and dyes 
division. He reports sales increased 
by 500.000 packages during its month 
and a half sponsorship of NBC TVs 
Masquerade Party in April and Ma\ . 
Where's the increased budget going? 
Network tv again, this time with NBC 
TV's Queen for a Day for 52 weeks 
from 2 October. Agency : Emil Mo- 
gul, New York. 

Latest guess as to the cost of 
Standard Oils huge 75th anni- 
versary spectacular is $700,000- 
plus. 

The "wonders of today and the 
promise of tomorrow" theme will be 
developed by a raft of such star per- 
formers as Jimmy Durante, the Cham- 
pions and June Allyson. Cyril Ritch- 
ard is doing the staging, McCann- 
Erickson the producer of the 90- 
minute show on 13 October. NBC TV 
will telecast both in black-and-white 
and in color from its Brooklyn color 
studio. 

Rayco Auto Seat Covers, Paterson, 
N. J., which has a chain of 150 stores 
nationally, is pegging its fall advertis- 
ing to tv and radio with newspapers 
and direct mail. Budgets are being 
hypoed from 10 to 20%, depending on 
the market. 



66 



The broadcast plan : tv. one- 
minute commercials on film and slides 
on 40 stations; radio, announcements 
during peak automobile traffic hours 
and in the middle of the dav during 
the week on 55 stations. The total: 
1.800 one-minute commercials a week 
for both. 

Five-market saturation on 11 ra- 
dio stations is scheduled by the 
Denalan Co., makers of Denalan 
No-Brushing Dental Plate Cleanser. 
One-minute commercials are being 
placed by Honig-Cooper, San Fran- 
cisco. 

Promotion at Theo. Hamm Brew- 
ing in St. Paul involve John R. 
Moran and John D. Callahan, both 
moved up to staff positions in the 
marketing division. 

Moran has been advertising man- 
ager since 1953, before which he was 
in charge of tv and radio advertising 
for Kroger in Cincinnati. Callahan, 
who has new duties as assistant to the 
director of marketing, has been man- 
ager of sales research and analysis 
and worked previouslv in market re- 
search for General Mills. 

Bert and Harry Piel are in con- 
ference planning a new promotion 
on the line of last year's Treasure 
Island contest. PieFs will again 
offer a tropical hideaway as first 
prize, along with an assortment of 
additional prizes. 

As an extra incentive, Henry J. 
Muessen, Piel Bros, president, has 
announced that added federal and 
state taxes payable by the grand prize 
winner as a result of accepting the 
island prize will be paid by Piel Bros. 
( up to $5,000 I . 

The air media will spearhead the 
campaign with newspaper and mer- 
chandising support. 

AGENCIES 

With the Erwin, Wasey-Ruthrauff 
& Ryan merger now official these 









SPONSOR 



SEPTEMBER 1951 



other iiu'ii who **ill head up the 

ihw sl'.ii million BgenCJ : 

David M. Williams, formei presi- 
denl "l Erwin, \\ asej . is pi esident. 

Roberl XX. Watson, former chair- 
man "I the 1 1< >.i i < I "I Ruthraufl >S Ryan, 
i- ( h.iii in. in oi the l»>. ii il. 

Howard D. Williams, formei 
chairman <>l the board "I Erwin, 
Wasey, is chairman of the finance 
committee; 

Roswell XX . [tfetzger, former exec- 
utive vice president and chairman <>f 
tin- executive committee oi Ruthraufl 
8 Ryan, is chairman oi ili«' executive 
committee. 

K. Kenneth Beirn, former presi- 
dent nf Ruthraufl & Ryan, is senioi 
\ ice president. 

Executive vice presidents "I the new 
agenc) .ire James I?. Briggs and Jere 
Petterson in New X. mk. Haakon 
Groseth and Larr) Northrup in Chica- 
aiul Emmet! McGaughe) in Los 
Angeles. 

igency appointments: Southern 
H i^i-n i t ( «>.. for its FF\ cookies and 
crackers, to CargUl «!C WUson, Rich- 
mond, Va. (\\\ v.p. Edward \cnr 
will supervise . . . Duffy-Motl Co. 
and its entire product line apple 
-..in e, Sunsweel prune juice and cooked 
prunes and Clapp's babj food to 
SS('H. New York, 15 September. 
. . . Erwin, Wasej has resigned the 
Hamilton Beach account due to "con- 
flict with the expanding line of toast- 
master," a Wasej client for 2!! years. 
Wasej will continue as the Hamilton 
Beach agencj until the end of the year. 
... J. Walter Thompson has picked 
up the Northeast airline- account (bil- 
ling $1.25 million i a> of 10 October. 
Former agencj was Chambers \ Wis- 
uell. Boston. Chambers & \\ iswell cur- 
rentlj i- having merger talks with the 
newlj merged Erwin, Wasey, Ruth- 
raufl & Ryan. 

Sessions Co.. Knterprise. Ma., pea- 
nut oil refiner, to Noble-Dury & 
Assoc., Nashville. It plans to use t\ 
and radio for i(- peanut butter, peanut 
oil and salad oil. All have 12-st.it.- 
distribution. 

Geyer Advertising, New York, re- 
ports resignation of the Paul Masson 
Vineyards account. It will continue 
i" service a New York Cit) tv show 
tor 13 weeks from 30 September. 

One of radio's biggest buyers is 
John M. Keavev. director of domes- 



in advertising foi I W X who has re- 
signed i" join Erwin, Wasej «.*v to. 

in \eu N . . i k ,i- ,i mi exei uii\ e on 

the newlj acquired kl.Xl account ef- 
fective 23 September. Keavej will con 
cent rate on Western hemispheric ad- 
vertising, working closelj with over- 
seas offices and the international de- 
partment. Mi- also worked at Fuller 
i\ Smith A Ross and al <.. M. Ha- 
loid. 

John \\ . Connor has been named 
creative directoi al Cunningham «X 
Walsh in San Francisco aftei working 
al McCann-Erickson in San Fran- 



cisco a- creative group directoi foi 
three years . . Loraine Steffens 
i- now i vice president oi t avanaugh 
Morris Advertising in Pittsbut 
where she is responsible foi creative 
developmenl and marketing. 

lucre's a change from down 

LexaS \">n\ tOO. Jack Wyatt now 

heads Jack \\ yatl < o. in Dallas 

aftei ' hang ing from NX I atl and 

(Ed) Bearden. I he Bearden art 

-tiiilio i mil nun- in sei \ ice \\ j ati 

i IhiiI-. \\ \ all i- fm mil pal Iner of 

\\ yatl S S< huebel in New X ork and 
i- now produi •■< and stai "f the I (alias 



Pittsburgh's fl/BWE2r Look' 



WIIC 
CHANNEL 11 



Now On the Air 



316,000 watts ERP 

serving 

1,237,000 TV Horn 

in the nation's 
EIGHTH MARKET 

with effective buying income of 
$8,731,815,000 

REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY 

BLAIR TV 




BASIC 



JL% 



AFFILIATE 



SPONSOR 



SEPTEMBER l'J.i. 



67 



FOR OVER lO YEARS 



■ 

Every year for more than a decade SPONSOR 
has gone up in advertising pages. 








1946 



1947 



1948 



1949 



1950 



1951 



THIS UNPARALLELED RECORD OF GROWTH 



IS NO ACCIDENT! HERE'S HOW IT HAPPENED 



■ ■ 



THING BUT 





No magic formula — just a simple case of an increas- 
ing number of advertisers discovering that adver- 
tising in SPONSOR pays off.* 

SPONSOR spotlights its editorial content 100% to- 
wards advertisers and agencies — and really hits the 
target. So much so that SPONSOR'S 1956-57 fiscal 
year recently ended showed advertising volume of 
SI. 000.000. 



'Write for the factual record of 

WOLF, WBAY, KPQ, WTXL 

and Storz in SPONSOR. TheN'll 
show how you ran build \>>ur 
spot revenue in your market. 



SPONSOR 



WGR-TV 

SELLS 

BUFFALO ! 




ABC AFFILIATE CHANNEL 2 

Peters, Griffin, Woodward, Inc. 






<f 



& 




>' ■ ■;';'>' i 'vi' 



1\ show, Confession, which is slated 
for nationwide show in" this fall. 



ASSOCIATIONS 

The proposed Writers Workshop 
lias heen given the go ahead signal 
by the hoard of Governors of the 
Academy of Televisions Arts and 
Sciences' New York Chapter. 

Mort Ahrahnis and members of the 
\\ orkshop committee have heen meet- 
ing since last May to organize the 
incubator for developing new writers 
and new writing techniques in televi- 
sion. Plans call for an initial student 
body of about 40 and four siminar 
groups conducted by such leading 
writers as Robert Allen Aurthur, Padey 
Chayefsky, David Davidson, Reginald 
Rose, Rod Serling, David Shaw, and 
David Swift. 

Forums dealing with the problems 
parallel to writing will be conducted 
by producers, network executives, per- 
formers and the like as an adjunct to 
the seminar program. 

Another workshop was proposed 
this week by the Writers Guild of 
America, West. This for investiga- 
tion of professional problems. The 
Guild accompanied its announcement 
of workshop plan with a blast at 
agency control of script contents. 

Meetings: RTES will hold its open- 
ing luncheon on 12 September at the 
Hotel Roosevelt, New York. Speaker 
is John C. Doerfer, new chairman of 
the FCC making his first major public 
address. The entire FCC will be 
present . . . Screen Cartoonist Guild 
will hold its fifth annual film festival 
at the Ambassador Hotel. Los Angeles, 



FILM COM PA N Y 

3825 Bryan • TA 3-8158 • Dallas 




on 28 September. On display will be 
the latest in animation styles and tech- 
niques developed for tv commercials, 
entertainment and business films. 

People in the news: Paul Roberts, 

new president of Mutual Broadcasting 
System, has been appointed a member 
of the board of directors of the 
NARTB. Roberts succeeds John B. 
Poor. 

FILM 

This week's sales barometer 
shows: 

• Two new buys and one renewal 
on WPIX-TV: General Electric will 
sponsor Captured for 52 weeks and 
has picked up Victory at Sea again. 
San Francisco Beat will have Paul 
Masson. Inc.. as alternate week spon- 
sor. 

• ABC Film Syndication, Inc., 
reports, first foreign sale of 26 Men 
to Amalgamated Television Services 
for telecast on two Australian stations 
in Sydney and Melbourne. Sheena, 
Queen of the jungle will also debut in 
Australia via Amalgamated. 

• RKO Teleradio has renewed 



\i,t* I 



You're headed in 

the right direction with 

plough, Inc., Stations! 



Radio Baltimore 

WCAO 



Radio Boston 



Radio Chicago 

WJJD 



Radio Memphis 

WMPS 



WWW 



"You musfve heard KRIZ Phoenix 
advertising baby carriages!" 



Represented nationally by 
RADIO-TV REPRESENTATIVES. INC. 

NEW YORK • CHICACO • BOSTON • SEATTLE 
ATLANTA • LOS ANGELES • SAN FRANCISCO 



70 



SPONSOR 



7 SEPTEMBER 1957 



\l( \ I \ r State I roopei l"i ili<- sex 
uinl year f"i K 1 1 1 I \ Los Vngeles 
ami \\ \ \t - 1 \ . Boston. Teleradio .il-.. 
renewed lh . Hudson's Secret Journal 
t"i .1 one-) eai i mm on W \ \< and has 
purchased Soldiers "l Fortune l"i .1 
veek In -1 1 mi i>n ili.it Btation. 

N<« merchandising gimmicks: 

1 I1.11 .11 in Merchandising oi New 
} <<\k u ill de\ elop a complete line <>i 
children's games and clothing to tie-in 
with /i\ - llmhtir Command. \ four- 
toot model water-shooting Greboal 
should delighl the small Frj . 

\K( Film Syndication offers .1 9el 
i>f "clicker spurs" .1- a promotion item 
1.. 1 26 Hen. 

Productions and people: Keith 
Larsen and Don Burnett signed to 
co-star in MGM's new half-hour series 
Vorihwest Passage pilot will go into 
production '* September . . . Preston 
Foster has completed a series of t\ 
commercials for Standard Oil (Indi- 
ana) . . . E<! Pierce, TV-Radio Di- 
rector of Wade Advertising, on a five- 
1 ii\ \\ est ('oast trip in connection 
with Miles Laboratories' sponsorship 
of Harbor Command . . . Fred Niles 

Productions will film the Oral Rob- 
erts religious crusades for t\ for the 
third consecutive year . . . Playhouse 
Pictures will represent the I .S. with 
two animated t\ commercials in the 
Fourth International Advertising Film 
Festival at Cannes, 2 1 -20 September. 
Entries were chosen to represent the 
new techniques of American anima- 
tion, being pioneered 1>\ the \\ est 
-1 industry . . . Filmaster Produc- 
tions & Studio Film Service have 
merged as Filmercial Production 
in L.A. 



NETWORKS 

U est Point lias gotten an eleventh 
hour reprieve and *ill be hack 
this season as a network show on 
\H< TV starting 8 October. 

New sponsors for the ZlV-packaged 
series are Van Heusen Shin- and 
Carter Products. 

West Point has been on CBS t\ for 
» year as .1 General Food- entrj but 

i- due to hf dropped the end of this 

mouth. 

VH( rVa new afternoon li>e pro- 
graming is beginning to pick up 
speed. The network has just 



j, a, 1 y 




and completely covered 



KTIIT's 0.5 mv/in contour 
blankets two and one-half millioji 

Gulf Coast residents, in 

750,000 radio homes. 
Reach them quickly, effectively, 
inexpensively by calling your 
Paul Raymer Van 




HOUSTON AND SOUTH TEXAS 



1 it's KSAN in San Francisco ^^ 

1 PROVEN MOST POPULAR WITH NEGRO LISTENERS ^Bk 

YEAR AFTER YEAR* ,•.**.**., A 


.-| [Willi 






\ cO \^B Mini n 

>S^) \^S^ 0*"«lAND 


|( , "Goes 
a \ Where 


Is Your 
Best Buy... 
Because 


1 ^P^PA V^^BSbSJ ALAMEDA 
SAN FRANCSCO 1 ^B I ^F 


llMIIhI 


\ w 

*"*• 1 ^ — \ \ "• 


fc\ Negro 


W. 


Goes Where 

280,000 
11 


\ SAN JOSf ^fe 


n\\s\ 


Lkla'-dlH 


\ \. 


Listeners 


. 




1__ - »■* ,_^.I m f ~|| I/O 111 Jlr' *- * 


1 
\A 


WRIT 

1111 MAR 


for specific proof of all KSAN clr 
intact Stars National, Tracy Moon 

E, WIRE, PHONE KSAN 

(ET STREET. SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNI 


11ms 10 lame, 
!,or 

A, MA 1-8171 



SPONSOR 



« SEPTEMBER l'J.i. 



A pictorial review of local 
and national industry events 



PICTURE WRAP-UP 






Anniversary of 35 years with Grey advertising is cele- 
brated by B. I, ("Bib") Brownold at dinner given in his honor. 
Silver tray is presented by Lawrence Yalenstein. chairman of the 
board — who as founder of the firm has five years' seniority 



Hard sell in San Francisco. KRON-TV sales manager Norman 

Louvau signs while 1 1. to r. ) Douglas Elleson, program manager; Jim 
Bentley, film buyer; monster; Jerry Hyams, director of syndication. 
Screen Gems, maintain mood. Buy is new "shock" film package 

Four soup labels and a buck. B. D. Graham, v.p. 

marketing. Heinz (1.), takes first RGA "Best of '57'" album 
from Louis A. Collier, manager sales promotion. Record 
premium is a part of the Heinz-'57 "once in a century" tie-in 







Day at the races hosted by WCDA-TA and WROW. Seated 
1 1. to r. I G. Duncan. Avery-Knodel ; M. Kane and A. Janowicz, 
OBM: M. Roffis. M-E; A. Moss and L. Avery. Avery-Knodel; 
J. Hudack, Warwick & Legler and J. Owen. Avery-Knodel 



It's Stuffed. "Bring 'em back alive" Bob Dalton of WTOP-TV, 
Washington. I). C., tries hand at lion taming in MGM promotion 




WWRl NIW YORK CITY 



//// Theresa Bc/kCh \ 
Horn, Odd j and rtt 






I 



•Theresa Baker 
302 Convert 
w York Citv N Y 



WWRL'S PERSONALITIES SEEL 

more merchandise for sponsors by: 
Delivering the largeat negro 
AUDIENCE for your product. . . . 
Supporting your schedule with a 
barrage of consumer ads. . . . 

MERCHANDISING CREWS work 
full time In Supermarket* and drug 
stores for you. . . . FREE. . . . 
LOW SEELING COST of 12c per 
thousand. . . . 

co/y or write 




- BEST FOR NEGRO PROGRAMS 




MORE 

radio homes at the 

LOWEST 

cost per home are 

DELIVERED 
by WSUN 

than any other station in the 

HEART of 
FLORIDA 

(Chock vour NieUen No 2) 

WSUN RADIO 

ST. PETERSBURG - TAMPA 

Represented By VENARD. RINTOUL, A 

McCONNELL 

Southeastern: JAMES S. AYERS 



snagged ||g first sponsor l<>r Do 

You I i u>t ) our M iff. 

I In- Monda) -tin ough-F i idaj quii 
I 10-5 p.m. ' has signed I irestone In- 
« 1 1 1 ~~ 1 1 i.il Pi oducts i Foamex i foi the 
Fridaj 1:30-4: 15 segment. 
Gre) is the agent j , 

< Its T\ »s top-rated Phil Silvers 
shoti will Imu this season on IT 
September >»iili b corned) produc* 
lion of Lehar'a operetta, The 

Mrrry II iilim. Staged al .1 network- 
created Cafe Maxims, replica of the 
Pai is < afe, the musical will stai Sil- 
vers as the romantic prince, Janel 
as the w idow w itli ideas. 

Produced l>\ Edward Montagne, 
tormerl) \\ illiam Est) producer for 
Mnn Igainst Crime and The Hunter, 
Silvers ) <>u'H Sever Get Rich is co- 
sponsored l»\ 15. J. Re) nolds I obacco 
(through Esty) and P & G (through 
Leo Burnett I , 

Robert Eastman, \IM! president, 
has just announced tin* creation 
of The Stations Department, which 

will offer all the former activities of 
the Station Relations Department plus 
a new concept in affiliate services. 
Heading this department will be Ed- 
ward .1. DeGray, v.p. in charge ol 

stations. 

"The newl) expanded department," 
says Eastman, "will work toward tin- 
end of adding strength to local pro- 
graming, [his is important because 
local programing and network pro- 
graming complement each other ami. 
naturally, increased audience for local 
benefits network shows, and vice 
versa." 

Mare Connelly's Pulitzer pla) 
Green Pasture* will kick off the 
season for \B( TVs Hull mark 
Hall of Fame on 17 October, 9:30- 

1 1 p.m. in color. 

The pla) will feature an all-Negro 
cast, starring William Warfield as De 
l.awil. Eddie "Rochester" Anderson as 
Noah and Cab Callowa) a- the King 
of Babylon. Connell) himself adapted 
the pla\ for t\ as he had previousl) 

done for the nun ies. 

The weekl) 90-minute -how i- spon- 
sored b) Hallmark Cards through 
FC&B. 

t* 
VJBC T^ Superman eerie* starring 
George Reeves scheduled to debut on 
Monday, 30 September. It's sponsored 



WHAT 

IS 
YOUR 
PHOTO- 
GRAPHIC 
MAL- 
ADJUSTMENT 



1) QUALITY ? 

2) SERVICE ? 

3) PRICE ? 

THESE ARE THE 3 
BIG PROBLEMS 

Let us cure them for you 
as we have done for some 
of the top business firms 
and advertising agencies 




DAKALAR 
°£0SM0 

^^bJ Pi otog raphers 

I 19 W. 57th St.. N.Y.C. Ci. 6-3476 
PHOTOGRAPHERS FOR SPONSOR 



BAKALAR-COSMO 

1 19 W. 57th St., N. Y. C. 

Gentlemen: Please have your re 
lativg ~~ Phone ~ Drop in 

Date Time 


presen- 








Address 


Tel. No. 









SPONSOR 



'KI'TKMBER 1957 



73 







ASCAP MUSIC... THE MUSIC OF SHOW BUSINESS! 

The American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers proudly presents a special issue of the ASCAP 

Program Guide entitled "40 Years of Show Tunes." Among the ASCAP membership are the men and women who 

have created top musicals for more than four decades. The compilation of songs in this 

latest Program Guide runs all the way from "Princess Pat" to "My Fair Lady." The listing 

includes not only the song titles with the composers, authors and publishers, but also names 

the performing artists and the available recordings of the hit songs of Broadway musicals 

from 1917 to 1957. Television and radio broadcasters, advertising agencies and all those 

engaged in entertaining the American public will find this Program Guide an invaluable 

source of program material. 

AMERICAN SOCIETY OF COMPOSERS, AUTHORS AND PUBLISHERS 

575 Madison Avenue, New York 22, New York 




74 



SPONSOR 



7 SEPTEMBER 195' 



You're headed in 

the right direction with 

Plough, Inc., Stations! 



Radio Baltimore 

WCAD 



Radio Boston 

WCOP 



Radio Chicago 

WJJD 



Radio Memphis 

WMPS 



¥ 3 S£ 



Represented nationally by 
RADIO-TV REPRESENTATIVES, INC. 

NEW TOMK • CHICAGO • IOSTON ■ SEATTLE 
ATLANTA • LOS ANQCLCft • SAN rRANCISCO 




That measuring man from 
KWTV-OKLAHOMA CITY 

. . . measures the SALESpower 
of KWTVs 1572' tower for 
timebuyers on Madison Ave.! 



altei Datel) bj I be Sweets Co. ••( 
\ni.i ii ,t (through 1 1. ii i \ I !-■ M \il\ ii ■ 
i isipg i .mil the Kellog i Co through 
I in Bui netl ' . 1 1 1 • — show fits into 

\ lit I \ ~ I. iii .ifiii i ii progi aming 

concept with its appeal foi the young- 
ei set. 

i MS TV's ii<- %% honr>long Sundaj 
aeries. Seven Lively iris, trill de- 
bnl on 3 November, 5:00-6:00 
p.m. with "I lie Changing Ways 

<>l Love." 

I In- 1- cil the series w ill be Seu York 
Herald Tribune i\ critic John Crosb) 
ami S. I Perelman \\ ti . . scripted t !■•- 
show, rhe ~|'"|Iil:Iii i>f the opening 
show w ill be on \iihi ica s romantit 
moods a^ portrayed in movies, si 
novels, magazines, and will include .i 
segmenl on the Kinsej Report. 

Mong with it s new management, 
\B\ has aeqnired a new symbol 

to represent the American Broadcast- 
ing Network a modern, trylon-shaped 
" \ . as it's described 1>\ Raymond F. 
Eichmann, \I>N director i>f sales de- 
velopment and research. 

[*he arrowhead-shaped insignia was 
designed 1>\ »BN's Hank Levinson 
and selected l>\ BHDO. agencj for the 
network. 



RADIO STATIONS 

Here's a Btation that < I i • I some- 
thing about the cost-of-living. 

\\ \\/. New Haven, waged a suc- 
cessful editorial campaign t<> reduce 
the price of gasoline in the New Haven 
area. Radio editorials broadcast dur- 
ing Vugusl emphasized to New Haven 
listeners that the) were paying more 
for gasoline than their neighbors in 
elose-h\ communities e\en though 
much of the fuel was first brought in 

through New Haven harbor. 

\\ it h i n tWO week- of the start "I the 
campaign, filling station prices dropped 
a- in in h a~ Id a gallon. 

S.R.O. means Swinuning Room 
Only. Over Iimi disappointed teen- 
agers were at the dock as the rivei 
boat \valon, with V7DG\ ili-k jockej 
Dan Daniel, started on a three-hour 
trip. 

The excursion was a teen-age part) 
sponsored b) the St Matthew - social 
activities organization ol St. Paul 
Promoted over W DG1 . over 1,400 
people crowded onto the decks of the 
boat . . . Vnothei waten note. this 



BOOO W 



Best Bui 



uses l tsuu 

KFcJI 

9 




Best Buy 

KLAMATH r^XLLS, OREGON 

Ask -the KAeeker Co. 



IISO KC 





Kansas is FREE 
When You BuvKMBC 

in Kansas City, Missouri 




. — . . ^-^ 


/ \ Q.X \ 


— — "~ !=«v"\, M _° 

KAN S—A 1 sV | / 



JCf%j 

BUY KMBC— 6,000 watts on 980 kc, 
to reach 2,340,660 people; $3,945,000,000 

spendable income; $2,9-19,000,000 r. tail 

<;KT KFRM — 6,000 watts on 550 kc— 

for the state of Kansas FREE! It's your 

market of 1.9 2 7, 150 population; 

,468,810 spendable income : s.'.'.Jl.- 

tail sales. 

KMBC-KFRM, the only bonus-buy 

radio stations in the Heart of the Nation. 

For choice availabilities, call 
your colonel from Peters, Grif- 
fin, Woodward, fur. 

DON DAVIS. President 
JOHN SCHIUING. E.ecut.ve Vice P" 
GEORGE HIGGINS, V P. arxi Soles Mortoger 
DICK SMITH, Moioger. KMBC -KFRM 



if> 



KMBC 6$ (Conjoi City 
KFRM £&% tHe State of K< 



a 



in the Heart of America 



Q 



SPONSOR 



SEPTEMBER 1957 



. I 



MUSIC 




jingles . . underscoring . . devices 


. . production 




JACK FASCINATO 


3010 lake glen drive, 


beverly hills, 


calif. 




credits 




a-I beer 


libbys 


armour 


mary blake 


aunt jemima 


meadowgold 


beads o bleach 


mogen david 


beautiflor 


off 


bendix 


oxydol 


bobbi 


page 


breast-o-chicken 


pamper 


carnation dairy products 


papermate 


car-nu 


post toasties 


champagne velvet 


postum 


charmin 


prom 


charm-kurl 


purex 


cloverbloom 99 


purity bakeries 


deep magic 


raid 


delsey 


rca victor 


dial 


seven-up 


dreft 


schlitz 


dutch masters 


scotch tape 


frigidaire 


sierra pine 


good seasons 


snowy bleach 


h f c 


sunkist 


hill man 


swift 


j-wax 


tame 


ken-1-ration 


toni 


kool-aid 


trix 


kocl shake 


white king 


kroger 


white rain 



Jhe&iMt of QowL 
otWvnfl in. 

City 




HOTEL 




/ /% /f 



34th Street C^_) at 8 th Avenit* 
Manhattan's largest and most con- 
veniently located hotel. 2500 outside 
rooms, all with bath and tree radio, 
television in many. Direct tunnel con- 
nection to Pennsylvania Station. Afl 
transportation facilities at door. Thre« 
air-conditioned restaurants 
LAMP POST CORNER . . . COFFEE HOUSC 
GOLDEN THREAD CAFE 

Singles I Doubles Suites 

from $7 from $ J "| >. * rom *23 

JOSEPH MASSAGLIA. JR.. Pr.tid«M 
CHARLES W. COLE. G.r, m,- 
r- Other MASSAGLIA HOTELS^ 

SANTA MONICA. CALIF. Hot.l Miramar 
SAN JOSE. CALIF Hol.l Saint. Clair* 
LONG BEACH. CALIF. Hold Wilton 
GALLUP. N.M Hot.l El Rancho 
ALBUQUERQUE. Hot.l Franciscan 
DENVER. COLO Hot.l Park Lan. 
WASHINGTON. O.C. Hot.l Ral.iqn 
HARTFORD. CONN Hot.l Bond 
PITTSBURGH. PA Hot.l Sh.rwyn 
CINCINNATI. O. Hot.l Sinton 
NEW YORK CITY Hot.l N.w York.. 
HONOLULU Hot.l Waikiki Biltmor. 
World-torn. d hotelj 
T.l.lyp* i.rv.c. — Family Plan 



time from WFBR, Baltimore, which 
is sending out Marine News Corre- 
spondent cards to listeners to insure 
local coverage of marine news events. 



BartelPs new station WILD, 
Birmingham, (WYDE on Septem- 
ber 2nd) received over 850 responses 
to its "Thought for the Day" promo- 
tion in a seven-day period . . . WILY, 
Pittsburgh, aired the following an- 
nouncement during every station 
hreak on 1 September: "Channel 1080 
welcomes Channel 11 to Pittsburgh. 

Personnel notes: Ira Laufer has 

been named general manager of 
KFOX. Long Beach. Cal. Laufer 
comes from KSHO-TV and KBMI, 
Las Vegas, where he was also general 
manager . . . John F. Box has been 
appointed general manager of the 
Bartell station WILD (formerly 
WBMS I . Boston. Box is also execu- 
tive vice president of The Bartell 
group . . . William Pinkney, Jr., 
formerly radio-tv director of Ross Ad- 
vertising, Peoria, has joined WIRL 
Peoria, as an account executive. 

George Stephens has been appointed 
director of agriculture for KCMO, 
Kansas City. He replaces Jack Jack- 
son who resigned to go with the Na- 
tional Grange . . . Dong Boaz, for- 
merly with Moloney. Regan & Schmitt. 
San Francisco newspaper reps, has 
joined KGW, Portland. Ore., as an ac- 
count executive . . . Harold Wheela- 
han is adding the duties of assistant 
station manager to his present com- 
mercial manager chores at WDSU, 
New Orleans . . . Sidney Goldstein 
has been named secretarv of the Wil- 
liam Perm Broadcasting Co. I WPEN. 
WPEN-FM), Philadelphia . . . Stan 
Cohen has been appointed to head up 
the expanded research, sales promo- 
tion and merchandising department of 
the WDSU Broadcasting Corp.. New 
Orleans. Cohen comes from Ziv. 



TV STATIONS 

A Tokyo produced film program 
on the trial of GI William Girard 
(accused of slaying a Japanese 
woman), was telecast by WCAL- 
TV, Philadelphia, on the eve of 
the trial. 

The program was handled b\ 
Charles Vanda. v.p. in charge of tele- 
vision. WCAl . and Charles Shaw. 



WCAU-TV news director. The half- 
hour film brought tremendous listener 
and press response. 

Saludos Amigos. WATV, New York, 
will make a real pitch for the Spanish 
language market of New York. 

I he station has contracted with Al- 
lied Television Productions for Span- 
ish language programs to slot in "AA" 
time. 

One. The Spanish Show, an hour- 
and-one-half variety show from 9:00 
to 10:30 p.m.. will start 15 September. 
Starting 4 October, WATV will air 
Spanish language feature films on Fri- 
day nights. 9:00 to 10:30. 

Those already signed for sponsor- 
ship include: Piels Beer, Common- 
wealth of Puerto Rico. Columbia Pic- 
tures. Sachs Quality Stores, and Bus- 
tello Coffee. The New York Spanish 
speaking market today exceeds 900,- 

000 people and is growing at the rate 
of some 1.400 each week. 

First tv program on the Asiatic Flu 
was aired on KDKA-TV, Pittsburgh. 
Called the Silent Invader, kinescopes 
will soon be available to other tv sta- 
tions throughout the country. 

Notes: Storer Broadcasting went on 
the air with WVUE-TV, Philadelphia 

1 replacing old call letters WPFH I . 
Opening telecast was a one-hour spe- 
cial program. The New / ue. . . . One 
of the largest installations of color tv 
equipment has been made at WFGA- 
TV, Jacksonville, which started broad- 
casting at the beginning of this month 
. . . Construction of Amarillo's third 
tv station. KVII-TV, channel 7 has 
now been started. The station is ex- 
pected to be in operation by 1 Janu- 
ary . . . WJTV, Jackson, Miss., has 
increased its power from 214.000 
Watts to 316.000. maximum allowed 
In the FCC . . . The nation's 505th tv 
station went on the air in Pittsburgh, 
last Sunday. W1IC-TY has been as- 
signed channel 11. . . . 

WWC-TV, New Orleans, will sup- 
plement its own news coverage 

through a contract just signed be- 
tween that station and CBS, providing 
news film supply to the station, u . 
Howard Summerville, general man- 
ager of the new station announced. 

Savs he: "The people in the viewing 
area of W WL-TV can be assured that 
they will be seeing the finest and most 
complete news coverage that is pos- 






76 



SPONSOR 



SEPTEMBER 195 "i 



>il»K- in bring them. \\\\l.-l\ tlso • Because of the cumulative qualit) 

v*. i J I earn *> full schedule <>f news "I radios audience, an advert isei musl 

events originating in New Orleans and schedule campaigns through daj and 

elsewhere in Louisiana." night times i" saturate i total market. 



People in the news > Robert Mao- 
Fayden has been promoted t<> assistant 
publicit) director f> >r k l v l \ . Los \n 
■ les . . . John Traxler has been 
named film buyer-director tor WI.W-I. 
Indianapolis. Traxler comes from 
KTVI, St. Louis . . . William L. 
Brooks, funnel Btate and regional 
tnanagei of Medlej Distilling Co., Iia^ 
joined WIII.IN. Evansville, Ind., a~ 
an account executive . . . Jaj Grill, 
director <>f sale- for KFSD-TV, San 
Diego, Calif., has been named vice 
president <>l KFSD, Inc. 

CANADA 

V new booklel published 1»> the 
Broadcast Vdvertiaing Bureau, 

Toronto, profiles Canadian radio 
listening today. Ii- kej conclusions: 

• Radio continuall) reaches more 
homes in Canada than anj other ad- 
vertising media. 

• Canadian families are spending 
more time with radio than with am 
other advertising media. 



® 



in 



Pulse 
March '57 



® 



Negro Ratings 

Morning 

Afternoon 

and 

Night 

in Results 



llic upward spurt in Canadian 
radio sot sales hai been accom- 
panied bj a dip i" the average li-i 

price of radio wH*. 

In L953 the average cost "I a re- 
ceive! was 18 1.94; m 1954, -7 1.5] and 
in 1955 the latest figures available 
average cost was down to S68.86. 

Brooks Advertising Agency, loi »n 

to, lia> recentl) acquired tw> majoi 
accounts: Ks><-\ Packers, Hamilton, 
i reported to lia\ e had one "I the 
largest advertising budgets in i lit- 

COUntr) and ii|i tn nOM handled h\ 

the advertiser direct), and Silknit, 
Toronto, including all ~i\ of it- prod- 
lit t- di\ isions I Silknit lingei ie, I <>\ - 
aide Brassieres, Cataline Swirasuits, 
\lamae Knitting Mills, Snuggledown 
and Lad) Burkleigh Sleep wear). 

Canadian Kodak will launch a hi»bl\ 
concentrated promotion lor the coming 
Christmas Beason with an "openlj 
first" message gift card in it* camera 

outfit. 

Alternate sponsorship of two Amer- 
ican-originated t\ shows, the Kd Sul- 
livan Show and Disneyland and 
national magazine and newspaper ads 

V.ill be Used. 

FINANCIAL 

Stock market quotations: Follow- 
ing stocks in air media and related 
fields are listed each issue with quota- 
tions for Tuesday thi> week and I ues- 
da) the week before. Quotations sup- 
plied b) Merrill I. \ nch. Pierce, Fenner 

and Beaue. 







Tnes. 


rues. 






Stock 


.'7 Vug. 


1 Sept 


t hangr 


Among Birmingham's long term 










radio advertisers. New York Cloth- 


\,n ) 


nrl. Stock 


Exchange 




ing Company, over 468 consecutive 


US-I'T 


16% 


18% 


• 1' • 




mr 


172% 


174% 


- 1 ; , 


weeks a WJLD advertiser, says. 


Vvco 


6% 


I. 7 . 




"WJLD, since 1948. has been the 


i BS "A" 


28% 


29% 


- 1 


backbone of my advertising. Re- 


Columbia Pic 


18 


18% 


- 


sults have always been most grati- 


l.uru '- 


ir.'-, 


1'. ; , 




fying." 


Paramount 


33% 


3 l'i 


• 


r<:\ 


13 




+ % 




5torer 


24% 


24% 


- % 




20th Fox 


26% 






lalf 1 1 1^ AM 


\\ arner Bros. 


22 




• 


w Jin 


W estinghouse 


62% 


'n'l 




WW tl L U FM 


American S 


Ext linage 






Ulied \iii-i- 


3* 






BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 


\--iii . \i t. Proi 


. 9hi 


9% 


- 


The Nation's Finest 


1 &< Super 


LS 16 


1 1 16 


- % 


Negro Radio Station 


Dumonl 1 .i!'-. 


1% 


I 1 -.. 






Guild Films 


_ ,T . 




+ 7 > 


Represented by FORJOE 


M\ 


: T . 






SPONSOR • 7 SEPTEMBER 1957 











You're headed in 

the right direction with 

Plough, Inc., Stations! 



Radio Baltimore 

WCAQ 



Radio Boston 

WCOP 



Radio Chicago 

WJJD 



Radio Memphis 

WMPS 



aW *k -' 



Rep'eir •<■ I ■ ■ 
RAOIO-TV REPRESENTATIVES INC. 

• NEW TORN • CHICAGO • HOtTON . HATTll 

• ATLANTA • LOS ANCILII • l*N FIANCitCO 




Most Powerful Twins 

CJON-TV *ss? 



Argcnfia 




%Ll« 300M 



' 'Captive Newfound landers 
and latest B6M Zkows 
85% oi all qreater St.Johns 
homes have TV $ets 



weeo i, co. US. 



STOVIN-CANAOA 



People are busy in 



Southwestern Pennsylvania 



but not too busy to watch 

More than a MILLION TV HOMES in this rich marketing 
area, and only WJAC-TV, which reaches into 63% of these 
TV homes, gives you maximum coverage. In its 41-county 
territory. WJAC-TV reaches 80% to 100% in 20 key counties.* 
You just can't blanket Pennsylvania without including 
WJAC-TV, the dominant force in the Keystone State's third 
TV Market! 

•Nielson Coverage Services — Report No. 2 (monthly coverage percentages) 

Ask your KATZ man for full details/ 





Payrolls are BIG 



/"A 



5*iQ 




mm 






Retail sales are Booming 




SERVING MILLIONS FROM 
/ j ATOP THE ALLEGHENIES 










78 



SPONSOR • , SEPTEMBER 1957 




Hit/it's fui[>i>,-niriK > n U. S. Got rrnmrnt 

that affects tponsoTs, agencies, ttatioru 



WASHINGTON WEEK 



7 SEPTEMBER 

Cooyrlght 1957 
SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC 



The broadcasting ;m<I advertising fields < ;m look forward i «» a breathing 
spell from investigation while Congress is in recess until 7 January. 

Hut the House Commerce subcommittee undei Rep. Morgan Moulder's chairmanship 
won't be entireh inactive. \ special!) trained selected staff will be studying the prelimi- 
naries for the committee's investigation of Govern mm t regulator) agencies. 

The broad question 1 1 1 i — ■ group was set up to stud) was the maimer in which the 
agencies are complying with the spirit of the lawn under which th< ite. (he 

Federal Communications Commission will -'<'t major attention. Bui the Bubcommittee 
at this stage doesn't appear to he any more interested in the Federal Trade < ommission 
than in any of tlir other agencies to be probed. 

The Bubcommittee inevitably will wind up covering the same ground alread) thor- 
oughly trampled h\ the (Viler antitrust subcommittee in 1956 with respect to the FCC. 

Charges put before it 1>\ members of Congress and other- include such accusatioi 
network eontrol of the FCC, political favoritism in the granting of licenses, disre- 
gard of antitrust violations by one applicant in choosing between competitors for 
struction permits, etc. 

The staff, mostly hired just for this one set of probes, is proceeding full steam ahead 
with its preliminary fact-gathering. Present plans are to have 1 1 1 i — work done, or at least 
well along, with respect to all agencies to be called on the carpet before starting public 
hearings. 

The FCC also has been set tentatively as the first (or one of the first) to be quizzed on 
whatever the staff digs up out of the record- of Senate Commerce Committee hear 
Celler hearings, and from their own leg work. 

A House Government Operations subcommittee under the chairmanship of 
Rep. John A. Blatnik (D.. Minn.) also has the FTC under Bcrutiny, ugh in 

the recently-concluded first chapter of the hearings there was no disposition to belabor that 
agency. There was much criticism of advertising claims and talk about strengthening the 
FTC laws, so that agency could he considerably tougher. 



The FTC, meantime, has been Btepping up its efforts with respect to medical 



•la 



claims. 



The Commission is also quietly readying -weeping action on cigarette filter chums, 
another sore point at the subcommittee hearings. 

Commission officials claim this is no sud len interest on their part, that they were in- 
vestigating before the Blatnik subcommittee got started, but that under the law the ' 
mills grind slowly. 

Filter cigarette complaints should be emerging before the Blatnik subcommittee starts 
up its hearing- again. 

17 September is the day for the much-heralded FCC meeting on subscription 

television. The FCC is due also to give more thought to such other old prol - the 

clear channel case, more power for the 250-watt (lass IN radio stations, and whether 
to permit the request of daytime radio station- for extended hour- of operation to lie 
dormant some more or just turn them down flat. 

The guessing is that there will be no quick approval for even a trial of broad- 
cast pay-tv. There i< some sentiment for stalling to see whether wired toll-tv will 
succeed, and by succeeding effectively cool down the currently very hot and controversial 
subject. 



SPONSOR 



7 SEPTEMBER 1957 



" 



GETTING THE MOST FRO 






"Snagged" by a ££wr ^9gg& 
Faulty Film Situation ? ^^^ 





UR FILM DOLLAR 



\S9**4S 




If so, you've a right to be "hopping mad" — especially if picture "smog," 

inflexible film presentations and high operating costs are 

blocking your progress. Better do something about it! Find out how to . . . 

1. Get the kind of picture quality that advertisers and television 
audiences want. 

2. Get this picture quality and enjoy low operating costs at the same time. 

3. Get the kind of expert programming that sparks and holds 
viewer interest. 



Let us show you how to plan your system to get 
these desired advantages. See your RCA Broad- 
cast Representative. Have him acquaint you with 
RCA's comprehensive TV Film Facilities — for get- 
ting better pictures and lower operating costs for 
both Color and Monochrome. 





Tmk s « 



RADIO CORPORATION of AMERICA 

BROADCAST AND TELEVISION EQUIPMENT 
CAMDEN, N. J. 

In Canada: RCA VICTOR Company Ltd.. Montreal 




7 SEPTEMBER 

Copyright 1957 
SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. 



A round-up of trade talk, 
trends and tips for admen 



SPONSOR HEARS 



Two of the major station-ownership groups headquartered in New York are 
on the search for topflight executives: 

The opportunities: (I) general sales director: (2l ^alcs promotion director. 



In radio they don't often (as has Ahe Scheehter) toueh the same hase twice. 

Back in the '30s, Scheehter was Mutual's news director. Now he's returned to the 
network's payroll as public relations consultant. 



Hill & K now 1 1 <>ii (which has P&G among its p.r. accounts) is doing a special 
trouble-shooting joh for the Crosley group in Indianapolis. 

If&K's main job is to counteract a local newspaper sniping campaign. 



Colgate's agencies are waiting for the other shoe to drop. A realignment of 
some of the brands apparently is coming. 

The reshuffling is expected hecause of (I) the split up of Colgate products into sep- 
arate soap and toiletries divisions, and (2) changes among sales and advertising ex- 
ecutives. 



William F. Hufstader, the sales mastermind, who rates next to the president 
in the General Motors operating hierarchy, apparently hasn't given up his quest 
for a tv coordinator. 

Although all divisions arc competitive, there's a common goal in Hufstader's plans: (1) 
keep CM on top of tv trends and developments, and 12) tr\ to reduce the cost-per- 
1000 of the various tv network investments. 

GM's 1957-58 commitment to date for network tv I time and talent) are headed for 
ahout $34 million. (See 4 May and 31 August SPONSOR-SCOPE.) 



What blurs the syndication price picture for many New York agency buyers is 
this: 

After they get a quotation from a syndicator, they find some stations Mill give 
them the same film series — plus time — for the identical price quoted by the syndi- 
cator. The hitch, however, is: 

• No control over the choice of the alternate week's sponsorship. 

• Limited freedom in selecting time or negotiating for reruns. 



Considering the record for executive turnover among the networks, CBS can lay claim 
to the longest list of survivors over a 20-year span. 

You will find these names on the officer and executive rosters for both 1937 and 1957: 
CBS: William Paley, Lawrence Lowman, James Seward, Joe Ream. John Karol, Herb 
\krrberg. Arthur Hayes, Bill Schudt, and Edward Murrow. 

NBC: Frank Russell, Carlton Smith, Jules Herbuveaux. and Edward Hitz. 
MBS: Sydney Allen, and Adolph Opfinger. 



82 



SPONSOR 



7 SEPTEMBER 1957 



CAN YOU TELL A FLOP? 

[Continued from page 35) 

which i- the lowest-priced horn pro- 
i i m ami 1 1 in ■ nt the most inexpensn e 
• •I all nighttime shows. 

\\ hilr advei t i ~< ■ t - were apparentl) 
willing to accept high costs il the rat- 
ings were high, jusl so-so ratings were 
a different story. 

Case in point: The Herb Shrine) 
Show. 

This comedy-variet) series started 
fairh well in October w i 1 1 1 subsequent 
ratings declining slightly. In Janu- 
ai\ To Tell the Truth was substi- 
tuted. Since 1\ viewing reaches a 
peak in Januarv and then starts a niihl 
decline until the \la\ drop, the new 

panel show's ratings can be interpreted 
a- somewhat better than Shrinei s. 

I > ii I there was no big leap. 

The cost of To I <■!! the Truth ua- 

122,000 average per week, however, as 
against The Herl> Shriner Shou cost 
,.t $45,000. Pulling down a much 
lower cost-per- 1,000 than its predeces- 
sor, To Tell the Truth was easil) re- 
newed for this season. 

The 10:30-11 p.m. slot on CBS T\ 
was a virtual burial ground for quizzes. 
First occupant of the period was High 
Finance which had all the ingredients 
of earlier and successful quizzes plus 
Borne complicated embellishments of 
it- own. Ratings from the beginning 

Were low and went lower. The) should 

have gone higher to keep even with the 
■naip general viewing upswing from 
^ptember to November. To hypo the 
-how. name personalities ijoe Louis 
for one) were brought in as contest- 
ants. 

In Januar) High Finance had been 
dropped and a new sponsor. Hazel 
Bishop, came in with another new quiz, 
} ou're On \ our Own. It made no bet- 
ter showing. A third quiz went on iii 
Ipril. This was an old-timer. Two for 
the \lonev. It was unsponsored and 
fared about as well as its two prede- 

irs. 
The late Saturday time period and 
opposition from NBC TV'a strong Hit 
Parade (as well as Saturda) evening 

feature film on independent stations) 
' an account for some of difficulties 
Buffered in this 10:30-11 p.m. period. 

However, time and opposition are 
not the onl) villains as far as ratings 
are concerned. 

Compare the records of \H(" TVs 
Cheyenne and Conflict programs. Roth 
are seen in the Tuesda\ 7:30-8:30 p.m. 
period — on alternate weeks. Both are 



pi mini id l>\ \\ ai mi Brothei s. I he 
have the same average weekl) talent 
production i osl and the same opposi 
tion. 

Bui here's w here the) diffei , < "» 

tin t -tailed out Willi Ian I BtingS and 

retained them until Ma) . < he) enne 
-tailed nil onl) slightly highei than 
Conflict lull kept building and build- 
ing it- audience. Notice the Western 

In-Ill ~i mil- even aftei lb'- normal Feb 

i ii.ii \ decline and \la\ dip. 

Here are some ways -| sors han- 
dled faltei in- -Imw-: 

• Quick cancellation at the end of 

13 week- as iii the i ase of NBC I \ '- 

// alter If imhell Show, among "tin i -. 

• Han- on longer (26 week- i In 

see if it'll catch on. NBC I \ "- \oah's 

Irk wa- ime tn ti \ this. 

• Change ami tighten the I tat, 

increase promotion. 

I n the latter case there w ei e notable 
h) pos i h.it worked and h\ pos thai 

failed. 

"-nine of the things thai didn't work: 

Stanley, NBC T\ situation comedy, 
tried adding variet) and a love in- 
terest. CBS l\ - Hey Jeannie, situa- 
tion comedy, turned to scrip! doctor- 
ing. NBC TV's Roliert Montgomery 
Slum which tried using more comedies 
and lighter material mixed with il- 
u-ual heavy drama, also added the in- 
no\ ation of a studio audience to pro. 
vide real laughter when it programed 
live corned) shows. 

On the other band Oh Susanna, an- 
other CBS T\ situation comedy, did 
pull up ami awa) b) doctoring the 
-nipt- and strengthening the situation. 
Note chart and Oh Susanna s stead) 
rise even after the January viewing 
peak. The low Ma\ rating i- due tn 
opposition from the NBC T\ special 
\lr. Broadway. The People's (li<>i<e. 
which also gained steadil) even pasl 
January (dipping onl) at the normal 
\Ia\ drop-off point i . made a pint 
change — the addition of a sure-fire 
secret man iage tw i-t. 

Brightest Cinderella stor) ol the 
past season was the recuperation of 
Twenty-One. This program -tailed off 
with extreme!) low ratings in a Wed- 
nesda\ 10:30-11 p.m. -Int. I he oppo- 
sition was VBC TVs Wednesday Vight 
Tights and CBS TVs alternating / . S. 
Steel Hour and 20th Century-Fos Hour 
dramas. What hoo-tod the quiz into 
the big ratings circle was a combina- 
tion of two things : (a) the Van Doren 
phenomenon and ibi a switch from 
the late Wednesday spot to Mondays 



MySiC 
\ M US J C 



MU S 'C - 




CLEVELAND'S STATION FOR MUSIC « NEWS 




with 

BOB GLACY 

mornings 6 to 9 
on 

WVET 
RADIO 

ROCHESTER,N.Y 

Represented Nationally by 
THE BOLLING CO. 



SPONSOR 



. sKeTEMBER 1951 



83 



9-9:30 p.m. in January. The new time 
put Twenty-One opposite CBS TV's 
high-rated / Love Lucy and ABC TV's 
low-pulling Life is Worth Living 
(Bishop Sheen). January ARB rating 
for t lit* Wendesday version was 18.5 
as compared with 16.2 for the new 
Monday show. But after that point 
the rise was practically doubled in the 
next month and went still higher in 
March (see chart). 

(Note: that 10.2 Monday night rat- 
ing for January was based on ARB's 
supplementary report which lias a 
smaller sample. I 

\\ hile Ticenty-One shows a decline 
in April and May, the ratings for both 
months are far ahead of the November 
rating — but the per cent of homes 
viewing in November is slightly higher 
than April and over 10' ', higher than 
May. 

While Oh Susanna, Peoples Choice 
and Twenty-One prove shows can re- 
cuperate, there are 50 other programs 
that began confidently at the start of 
the 1050 fall season but have not re- 
turned this year. There are also sev- 
eral other shows that were born mid- 
season last year only to die mid- 
season last year only to die. ^ 



VITAL 30 DAYS 

{Continued from page 34) 

plausible plots. The show made a 
comeback through improved scripts. 
For this fall, scripts of main shows 
will be checked for greater credibility, 
more identifiable situations. 

6. Building audience prior to the 
debut through promotion is not 
enough. \\ Idle the month surrounding 
the show debut gets the bulk of pro- 
motion budgets most tv advertisers 
follow up this effort with weekly or 
monthly mailings as well as major 
pushes on a quarterly basis. 

"'If a show is well merchandised 
prior to its premiere, its pick-up is im- 
proved in proportion." says Sylvania's 
director of advertising. Terrv Cunning- 
ham. 

"Tv is show business and requires 
the same care as movie and theater 
promotion. If your show runs the 
average between $75,000 and $100,- 
000 weekly in time-and-talent on a 52- 
week contract, you should certainlv 
spend $150,000 to $200,000 on promo- 
tion in the 30 days prior to the show." 

7. New shows must always be 
kept on tap. If the first rating pegs 
your show as a real turkey, you might 




v^en 



There's plenty of moss on us! 

If you want your pitch to gathei n h >■>- 
when you throw it down and walk 
around it, there's $2,739,749,000.00 roll- 
in;.; around in the WBNS Radio area. 
It Mm want to be sure of top Pulse 
ratings 315 times out ol 360 Monday 
thru Friday quartei horns (i a.m. to 
midnight, you want WBNS Radio \--k 
John Blair. 

WBNS RADIO 

COLUMBUS, OHIO 



as well start scouting for new product 
right then. Producer contracts that 
don t allow for some escape are get- 
ting more and more rare. After all, 
producers plan to be in business next 
year and their other product isn't en- 
hanced by having a flop on the air. 

^ ou might be able to get part of 
your money back by selling a half- 
interest in your show to a co-sponsor, 
but clients who've li\ed through the 
sad experience of a flop will tell you 
that this sounds better in theon than 
in practice. 

"We were ready to practicall) jii\e 
awav half of our show and no one 
would nibble." the ad director of a 
major firm with a 1956 flop told 
sponsor under understandable anony- 
mity. 

"It's usualb more practical to swal- 
low the loss vourself and get out at 
all cost. Trying to peddle a flop is a 
waste of time, unless you just miscal- 
culated on the type of audience appeal 
and can think of an advertiser who 
wants to reach just the type of people 
you happen to be getting." 

8. Don't be caught short. Most 
major tv advertisers today have their 
finger on a couple of reserve shows 
"just in case." This doesn't mean op- 
tions usualb. but just close contact 
with packagers who've got likely ideas 
that could be developed fast and 
thrown into the breach. 

"We're continuously shopping for 
new 7 shows." says Bristol-Myers' Dick 
Van .\ostrand. "because we take a 
long-range view in all show categories. 
Right now we've got two action shows 
and a quiz up our sleeves." 

9. Shifting gears in mid-season 
is an expensive proposition. Beyond 
the loss in show investment I if you re 
dropping the original program), 
there's the additional cost of promot- 
ing the new show or time to the trade 
and the sales force. 

"You're going to have to devote at 
least one commercial to the new show 
announcement.'' the advertising di- 
rector of a major tobacco company 
told SPONSOR. 

"That means some S25.000 on that 
commercial alone, figuring it's costing 
one-third of the show. Then there's 
the additional cost of new merchan- 
dising and promotion which generally 
has to come out of our tv budget." 

Additional out-of-pocket expense for 
a 52-week client switching shows in 
mid-year could run as high as $250.- 
000. This would mean that his weekly 



84 



SPONSOR 



SEPTEMBER 1957 



-how « - 1 > — t would actuall) be increased 
bj another 15,000. 

I here are as man) u.i\ - ol resusci- 
tating -how- as there are shows on 
the aii ■ The onl) facts thai hold 1 1 ue 
throughout is tin- need for thorough 
audience promotion prioi to the debul 
and the need foi continuous merchan- 
dising .mil promotion effort through 
the year. Other safeguards depend up- 
on individual circumstances. 

■^ ou can'l start a situation corned) 

< old mi the ail. -av- \e-tle- Don 

Cady. "It needs a warm-up in tin- form 
oi familiarizing the audience with tlir 
characters and personalities involved. 

This holds true for other forms <>f 
dramatic shows as well. Says Gre) 
Advertising tv-radio v.p. \l Hollander: 
"Each show type has a different de- 
velopment pace and the audience pro- 
motion should take these differences 
into account. \ Western, for example, 
tend- to have a slower start hut better 
building power and continuation. \ 
big-name musical reaches its peak rap- 
idly, I believe. Clients should also take 
these differences into account when 
interpreting a first rating. \ bad firsl 
rating is not necessaril) the signal to 
-tail looking for a replacement show."" 




POWISR 

II tokes (wo types of power to dominote 
the entire Western Market os KOA- 
RADIO does! Creative power that s alive 
to the needs and wonts of the vast 
radio-listening West . . . 

PLUS 

50.000 WATT POWER-that carries 
the welcome voice of KOA-RADIO 
throughout a 12-stote area . . . 
reaching 4,000,000 listeners! 

POWERFUL SALES RESULTS, TOO! 

KOA-RADIO is the only station 
you need to sell the West's entire 
rich market! 




One of America's great radio stations 



850 Kc 



50,000 WATTS 



10. Paid advertising helps main 
lam audieni e, ii - t • - 1 1 alnv >-t univ ei - 
sally, Iheiefoie client- should figure 
on an added budget foi weekl) news- 

papei ad- to promote the -how. in ke) 
cities at lea-t. 

"\\ e do thai in addition to weekl) 
mailings to out -ale- fort <■." -a\ - 
( leorge I.. Newt omb, advert ising man 
agei oi Singei Sewing Mai hine I o. 

"\\ hen it - OUl ou n -how . the hunliii 

oi promoting it prett) much falls on 
ii-. but when it's a network package, 

the network always has to do a ■■ I 

part o| the merchandising and pro- 
moting." 

Paid ad\ ei t ising ha- to he taken . are 
ol h\ the client himself. ISiit merchan- 
dising i- frequentl) absorbed at leasl 
in part b) the agenc) in return fot 
package -how commissions (see spon- 
sor 31 Vugusl "Are client- ducking 
l.Vr on i\ package Bhows? '). Now i- 
ihe time when clients should he com- 
pletel) clear on the e\ad contribution 
theii agencies will make to the promo- 
tion, publicity and merchandising of 

the -how. 

I!\ eai K September, promotion and 
a erchandising plan- have alread) been 

formulated and set into motion. (See 

"Audience promotion check li-t. page 
12 this issue.) \> a last-minute re- 
minder, these are steps network t\ cli- 
ent- should have taken b) thi- time. 
including some that can -till he picked 
up for October launchings: 

Well-rounded show promotion 
should include press parties in the ma- 
jor cities a- well a- in the cit\ where 
the show originate-. liristol-Myers is 
kicking oil it- Tombstone Territory on 
\i;<: T\ Wednesdays 8:30-9:00 p.m. 
starting 1<> Octobei with a pie— junket 
to Tombstone, Arizona, for example. 

More and more client- are hiring 

outside publicists to help promote the 
-how beyond the job the network and 
agenc) do. 

The warning experienced advertis- 
ing director- oiler here i- : 

"Don't spread your promotion bud- 
gel too thin. The more people you've 

got involved in the campaign, the more 
are collecting a non-productive service 

lee. 

"On the other hand, there'- no ques- 
tion hut that an outside p.r. -hop - 
cializinji in show promotion will he 
able to provide services you wouldn't 
Otherwise have. The most important 
thing then i- to estimate the budget 
correctly, so that you use it in the 
-t effective wai . ^ 




San Antonio 



MORE DAILY HOME 
AUDIENCE IN SAN 
ANTONIO THAN 
ANY OTHER STA- 
TION!* 

MUSIC 4 NEWS 
for ADULTS 

Coll Avery-Knodel, Inc. 




&y _> - 





30 




Only ONE is otop the 

Continental Divide 

Serving both the Atlantic and 
Pacific Sides of America 

KXLF - TV4 Montana 

Butte 
East— The Walker Co. 
West — Pacific Northwest Broadcasters 



SPONSOR 



7 SEPTEMBER 195 1 



85 



by Joe Csida 



and still growing 



I Sponsor 




ROCKFORD 

market power! 



New industries continue to come to 
Rockford . . . and companies already 
here continue to expand. That is why 
Rockford has become the NO. 1 City 
in Illinois (outside Chicago) . . . and 
a rich market for your products or 
services. Rockford is the 2nd largest 
machine tool center in the world . . . 
34th in the USA in expendable income 
. . . 36th in buying power . . . and 
13th in Postal Sav'ngs. 



and still growing 



• Survey after Survey of 14 
counties indicates Uncontested 
Dominance of Northern Illinois- 
Southern Wisconsin area by 
WREX-TV. 

• Combined rural and industrial 
following . . . ideal for test 
campaigns. 



WREX-TV 

sales power! 



WREX-TV — "The Viewers' Choice" 
DELIVERS your message to the buyers 
in this rich industrial and agricultural 
market. 

The consistent high quality in produc- 
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both spots and programs has earned 
many major awards for WREX-TV this 
year! For the best medium to reach this 
Rockford area market consult H-R for 
the WREX-TV story. 

J. M. BAISCH, General Manager 

REPRESENTED BY H-R TELEVISION, INC. 



■w:r,E2 x-tv 

CHANNEL 13 

ROCKFORD 
ILLINOIS 




More action on the film-front 

A certain percentage of readers, it seems I like 
a certain percentage of people anywhere) are 
inclined to be slightly sensitive and occasionally 
emotional. And no matter how plainly or care- 
fullj a columnist tries to say what he has to say. 
it is almost impossible to be completeK under- 
stood by all the people all the time. Some time 
ago I did a piece in which I said I believed m\ 
old friend. Milton Kackmil. the double president (Universal Pictures 
& Decca Records I could have made a better deal for the tv rights to 
his Universal-International library a vear earlier, than he could at 
the time he was negotiating. 

In April when the column appeared I heard nothing from Rack. 
Bui on August 5 came a tearsheet from the \ en 1 ork Herald- 
Tribune, with a three-column cut of Rack and Leo Jaffe, vice presi- 
dent of Columbia Pictures, signing contracts. The contracts called 
for Screen Gems, a Columbia subsidiary, to pa) to I niversal $20.- 
000.000 over a seven-year period. In return for this S20.000.000. 
Screen Gems has the exclusive distribution rights for television to 
the U-I catalogue of over 600 pictures for that seven-year period. 
Attached to the tearsheet was a note from Rack, which said: 

"So how often can you be this wrong?" 

In view 7 of the Warner Bros. deal. Rack's deal looks sensational. 
In view- of the MGM deal, maybe not so great. The fact remains that 
I believe Rack was over-sensitive when he chided me about being 
wrong. I didn't sav he wouldn't be able to make a good deal. He 
did. I merely said he wouldn't be able to make as good a deal as 
he might have made a vear earlier. I believe he could have gotten 
more than S20.000.000 a year earlier. If Rack would like to debate 
this in '"Backstage." I'd be happy to. but till he sa\s he would. I'll 
drop the matter. 

Horror package is smart selling 
Regardless of how good a deal Rack made for the catalogue, I 
believe Screen Gems is doing a very smart selling job on it. Splitting 
the films into packages, and particularly "Shock"' horror film pack- 
age is smart merchandising and selling. I like the promotion idea, 
which someone has developed, for kicking off the package in four 
major markets simultaneously. Earl) in October, one specific week 
will be promoted as "'National Weird Week." and on that date two 
major East Coast stations and two major West Coast stations will 
kick off the "Shock"' shows. \Y \BC-TV in New York and W C U - 
TV in Philadelphia, and KTLA-TV and KRON-TV in Los Angeles 
and San Francisco respectivel) will telepremiere the "Shock" films, 
most likely with the original Boris Karloff "Frankenstein." 

The overwhelming success at the box office of the New ^ork Para- 
mount Theatre of the English-made "The Curse of Frankenstein" is 
a fairly good sign that the "Shock"' package will be a rating suc- 
cess. And it's this kind of promotion and showmanship which pays 












SPONSOR 



SEPTEMBER 1957 







Two exciting 

personality programs 

daily from Detroit's 

EASTLAND SHOPPING 

CENTER 



a 



The huge, new $25 million Eastland Shopping Center 

is the talk of Detroit. It features 73 stores, has 
parking space for 8300 cars, serves a neighborhood 
of almost a half million people— more people than 
live in Omaha, Toledo, Nashville, Miami or 
Ft. Worth. 



Naturally, WWJ is right in the center of things — with 
its exclusive glassed-in studio, two top notch music 
-and-interview programs every weekday, merchan- 
dise displays, and other salesmaking features. 



Step up your Detroit business by using this power- 
ful one-two punch on WWJ. 



WWJ 



AM AND FM 

RADIO 



WORLDS FIRST RADIO STATION 
Owned and operated by The Detroit News 

NBC Affilioie 

National Representatives Peters, Griffin, Woodward, Inc. 




JIM WOOD 




1 1:05 A.M.- 12 Noon — 


Weekdays 


r 


\ 


V* / 


. 


w¥ 




i ^p* v 


,1 



JIM DELAND 
4:30-6:00 P.M. — Weekdays 



SPO\-mk 



i -KPTF.MBKR 195"i 



87 



114% MORE audience 
than Station B ALL DAY!* 



WILS 



Mar. -Apr. '57 Hooper in Lansing Shows 
MONDAY THRU FRIDAY 



7:00 a.m. -12 noon 
12 noon-600 p.m. 



WILS 
61.4 
53.7 



Station B 
23.5 
30.1 



5000 

LIVELY WATTS 



MORE listeners than all other 
stations heard in 
Lansing combined 

Mar. thru Apr. 
average C. E. Hooper, Inc. 



LANSING 




Represented Nationally 
by 

Venard, Rintoul & 
McConnell. Inc. 




/ # 



WILS 

^0- n ^ s s Y °^ s 



Sponsor backstage continued 



off in extra dividends for agencies and advertisers. 

Another column I did which seemed to he somewhat misunder- 
stood was the one on the music-news-service format of the Plough. 
Inc.. stations. I did not say that I believed the Plough stations had 
originated the music-news-service format, nor the top 40. nor any 
other music format. I merel\ pegged the column on the Plough 
move to copyvvright its format. I even made the point that I did 
not know whether the format was copyrightable at all. Yet some 
very bright broadcasters like Jake Kmbrv of WITH. Baltimore and 
James Brown of KOSI. Denver wrote sponsor and me as though 1 
had credited Plough with originating the entire music-news format. 
Mr. Brown made the point in his letter that people like Todd Storz. 
Dave Segal and many others had contributed substantially to the de- 
velopment of the music-news format. I couldn't agree more. 

Another variation on the music format 

And now along comes WORL in Boston with vet another variation 
on the music format. Again I hasten to add that I'm not at all sure 
that the Boston station is the first to use this variation. But I find 
it a highly interesting one. What WORL is doing is programing a 
full and consecutive 15 minutes of music by individual artists la 
quarter-hour of Crosby; a quarter-hour of Sinatra: a quarter-hour 
of Patti Page; a quarter-hour of Betty Johnson, etc.). The format 
takes care of top current records by recording artists, who haven't 
yet had a full 15 minutes of stuff released, by inserting periodicallv 
and quite often, a variety bandstand segment, during which time 
current hits by such artists are lumped together. 

WORL calls this treatment "950 Club Programing." claims to 
present 950 music stars every week on the Revolving Bandstand. As 
far as I'm concerned this format has a great deal of appeal and in- 
terest, but it also has some inherent dangers insofar as holding an 
audience is concerned. It seems to me that if the station is playing 
15-minute segment of an artist the listener doesn't like, they're al- 
most sure to lose that listener. I can see a listener sitting still for 
one tune by an artist whose vocal qualities do not appeal to him. but 
I cant see that same listener holding still for 15 minutes of music 
by an artist he finds unattractive. 

This, of course, is purely a personal opinion, and I could easih 
be wrong. At any rate I feel the WORL idea is a fascinating one 
and I hope it works fine, whether WORL or any other station orig- 
inated it. I've written a number of columns urging a more im- 
aginative, more intelligent use of the tremendous wealth of recorded 
music available today. For the more imaginative and intelligent such 
efforts, the larger the audience for advertisers. 

I can't close this week's piece without saying how very glad I am 
to see Joe Ream coming back to work for CBS. Joe retired as execu- 
tive vice president of the network in August 1952. and he's been 
awa\ much too long. He's coining back as vice president in charge 
of CBS's Washington office, and I, along with his thousands of 
friends in the industry, welcome him back. He s one of the bright- 
est and nicest men ever to grace the broadcast field. ^ 




Letters to Joe Csida are welcome 

Do you always agree uith what Joe Csida says in Sponsor 
Backstage? Both Joe and the editors of sponsor will be happy 
to receive and print your comments. Address them to Joe 
Csida, c/o sponsor, 40 E. 49th, New York 17, New York. 



88 



SPONSOR 



7 SEPTEMBER 195' 



We 

Sincerely 
Believe : 






. . . that the vast majority of WSB Radio's hun- 
dreds oi thousands of consistent listeners are old 
enough and mature enough to have minds of 
their own — 

. . . and that by yiving them variety in music, 
intelligent and comprehensive news coverage, in- 
terspersed with well planned local and network 
programs — 

. . . presented to them on the air by pleasing 
personalities instead o*i "characters" — 

. . . results in a WSB Radio audience with a pur- 
chasing potential that dwarfs that of any other 
radio station in the .Atlanta market. 



ii, defend our audience against ///<• untrue th 
that "tin- average mentality of the listening public 
is iluit of a fourteen-year old." 



WSB Radio is not a juke-box-program typed Motion 
with just "the top 10-2 " 10- ■ tunes" 
rammed into our list, n, is' airs day and night. 



We insist that our WSB Radio air s[, , nt 

themselves as guests in our listeners' hom,s. 
easdx understood and liked by every member of the 
family from eight to eighty. All rating sui 

prove our dominant <;< ( eptam e in < - 



// you want to reach tin HI ) INC members of the 
radio families in the Atlanta market us, H s/J Radio. 




WSB/ RADIO 

The Voice of the South . Atlanta 

tied with The Atlanta Journal and Constitution. 
NBC affiliate. Represented by Edw. Pett I I 



SPON.-OR 



7 SEPTEMBER 195, 



89 




SPONSOR 
| SPEAKS 



Tv stability 

It network; television is to achieve real stability, it must 
break the cycle in which: 

(1) there i> a high percentage of program casualties 
which 

(2) bids up the price of surviving programs and 

(3) increases the tendency to drop programs whose rat- 
ings are weak — because the cost is so high. 

There is no formula way this can be accomplished. As tv's 
collective wisdom increases with the years, the high show : 
turnover rate will simmer-down. Television, after all, is 
barely 10 years old — a fact often overlooked by it- critics. 

But we believe there is something each individual adver- 
tiser and agency can do now to slow T the turnover rate. 

Instead of making quick decisions in the next few months 
to drop shows that start weak, more clients should seek to 
save their shows through concentrated program doctoring. 

True, the stakes are high and you can't afford an extended 
buildup period. But the experience of a number of clients in 
past seasons (see article page 33) shows that changes in 
format and scheduling can be made to pay off. 

You have to move like a trip-hammer and do in weeks what 
network radio's showmen could take months to do. And you 
can't save every show. 

But every show T that admen can breathe life into helps 
break the cost spiral and contributes to tv's stability. 

New ubiquitous comestible over-all 

We recently reported on Nucoa's New York radio-plus- 
skywriting campaign under the title "The flight that flopped" 
(17 August, page 32). We thought the Nucoa approach to 
humorous selling had much too much humor and virtually 
no sell. Now we're pleased to report Nucoa is moving to 
more practical use of radio with its "New r ubiquitous co- 
mestible over-all" commercials (the initials spell Nucoa). 

But we're still not really happy. These commercials are 
fun to hear. But they are tricky and mighty far from lining 
enough time explaining just win Nucoa is good margarine. 



6 



THIS WE FIGHT FOR: Cash-register results 
arc the true index of media effectiveness. Yet 
most air media research is built on ratings. 

Air media havers and sellers should work to- 
gether to end this lopsided research emphasis. 



•Ml 



lO-SECOND SPOTS 

Bali-hi! From a Screen Gems, Inc. 
release. "On Bali there are no nerv- 
ous breakdowns or ulcers."' Just the 
place for a Madison Avenuer's vaca- 
tion ! 

Research: Sign on the wall of the re- 
search department in a New York sta- 
tion rep firm: "ON \\ If VT DO YOU 
BIAS YOl H OPINION?" 

Outnumbered: When the American 
Women in Radio and Television con- 
vene in San Francisco next spring, Mi 
Call's Magazine will present its annual 
awards. About 800 AW RT women will 
be on hand. McCaWs is sending 20 
men — a ratio of 40 to 1. That should 
make the girls happy! 

Ad safety slogans: Bartell station 
W AKE, Atlanta, ran 400 announce- 
ments over the labor dav weekend to 
remind motorists: "Wake to walk Tues- 
day. Drive as though vour life de- 
pends on it. 

Big tee: From WJBF-TY. Augusta. 
Georgia — "Bill Crichton. pro golfer, 
drove a golf hall off the top of WJBF's 
new 1.202-foot tower ... No one knows 
for sure if am records were set. But 
it is believed to be the first time a golf 
ball has been driven down 1.202 feet. 
Okay, drive it up again! 

Kow-chu! The Asiatic flu was the 
subject of a W estinghouse station. 
KDKA-TY. Pittsburgh, program. The 
program's title — "The Silent Invader." 
Sounds a little like the Hidden Per- 
suaders to us. 

Brrrr! To promote the new Herb "Os- 
car" Anderson show. ABC T\ will 
have live models dressed in barrels in 
front of such agencies as Lennen ^v 
Newell; B&B; JWT: Mc-E; SSC&B; 
A\er: Bates: Dohertv. Clifford. Steers 
& Schenfield; Kudner: Y&R: BBDO. 
and D-F-S. The letter announcing this 
event concludes. "We will use six pairs 
of models who will spend half their 
time in front of one location and the 
other half in front of another so that 
if they are not at one location at a 
given moment, the) are at another lo- 
cation nearby. You hide 'em. ABC. 
and we'll find them! 

Odd clients: \ recent list of NBC 
Radio clients was headed b\ this one: 
Abstainers Association of America. 
Liquor, sex or television? 









SPONSOR 



SKI'TEMBER 1057 














meT 










rQe D^° e 
,._ George 






wSSUi 



SUCCESS STORIES 

WMAQ 

RADIO • CHICAGO 



m 



- 



14 StMCMHK 

20< • copy • S3 i» 



PO 



OR 



THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE TV/RADIO ADVERTISERS USE 




ommunity Club Awards" gives you 




g, profitable sales results that you can see in black and white! 



Community Club Awards now in 8th cycle 
WITH. Cycle No. 9 begins December 2. 

Community Club Awards has run longer and 
re often on WITH than any station in the 
ntry. 

Community Club Awards has grown eight- 
1 in results— 1st through 7th cycle. 



■ Community Club Awards boasts long li.-t of 
blue chip advertisers. Many on radio exclu- 
sively on WITH. 

■ Community Club Awards has already given 
over $80,000 to Baltimore clubs. 

■ Community Club Awards has its own 
and full time director on WITH. 




m Tinsley 

sident 

C. Embry 
e Pres. 



c o 



F I D E N C E 



onol Representatives: Select Station Representatives in New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Washington, 
Forjoe & Co. in Seattle, San Francisco, Los Angeles; Simmons Associates in Chicago 
and Boston; Clarke Brown Co. in Dallas, Houston, Denver, Atlanta, Miami, New Orleans. 



CLIENT REVOLT 
ON TV COSTS 
BREWING NOW? 

\<llll<-M ll.l\r t, like. I 

about l% 

but now the) 1 

ous. Objective: not to 

CUl builgrl- but to make 

the dolbji more efficient 

Page 33 



Why ABN dropped 
Nielsen radio 
ratings 



Page 36 



How tv licked 
a winter 
sales slump 



Page 38 



Nighttime 
radio's star 
is rising 

Page 40 



GREEN BAY 

GATEWAY TO THE 
ST. LAWRENCE SEAWAY 




PoV ttW»on t,*27,„00 
41,890,813,000 




(2) 



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and growing faster than the rest of the state. 

50th Market in the U.S. 
in TV Homes 



368,327 TV Homes 



(3) 



WFRV-TV Covers This Far-Above-Average 
Market Best and /Most Dependably 

...with ABC and CBS 



and the NTH Tower, 1165 Feet Above Average Terrain 



Some Choice Availabilities 



Soren H. Mlinkhof Exec. V.P. & Gen. Mgr. 

WFRV Building, Green Bay, Wisconsin 



Highest Antenna 
in 5 State Area. 



HEADLEY-REED TV 

National Representative 






(') Sales Management Survey of Buying Power, June 1957 

(2) Same 

(3) Television Magazine Market Book, August, 1957 




A COWLES OPERATION 

KRNMV 

Full Power Channel 8 In Iowa 



KRNT-TV SCORE 



311 FIRSTS 

in 485 Quarter Hours 



(THE JUNE A. R. B.) 



TOP TEN MULTI-WEEKLY 



•KRNT-TV 



' 2. 

•3. 

' i 

5. 
* 6. 
' 7. 
*8. 
*9. 
•10. 



Russ Van Dyke News ... 10:00 P.M 3 

Al Couppee Sports ...10:20 P.M 2 

Paul Rhoades News . . . 6:0C I 1 

Guiding Light ... 10 45 AM 1 

Jack Shelley News ... 10:00 PX 1 

As the World Turns 11:3' 

Search for Tomorrow 10:30 AM 1 

Don Soliday News . 1 2 30 P.M. 1 

Bill Riley 1200 Nr 1 

love of Life 1C15A'-' 



•: ; 



TOP TEN ONCE A WEEK 



•KRNT-TV 

' 1. Gunsmoke 40.0 

' 2. Ed Sullivan 35 5 

' 3. To Tell The Tru'" 

' 4. The Lineup 

' 5. Climai ... ....31.8 

• 6. What's M, Line 31.5 

7. Lawrence Welk .28.8 

8. Panic ...28.5 

9. Wells Fargo 28.2 

•10. I Love Lucy 28.0 



SPONSOR • 14 SEPTEMBER 1957 



14 SEPTEMBER 1957 • Vol. II. Vo. 37 



THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE TV/RADIO ADVERTISERS USE 



DIGEST OF ARTICLES 

Is a client revolt against tv costs brewing? 

33 Admen have talked about l\ costs For \ears. This fall there's more 
inclination to seek economies than ever before. The objective: not 
to cut television expenditures hut to make them more efficient now 

Why ABN dropped Nielsen 

36 This i> no case of a momentary irritation between rating service 
and client. Network's decision is part of its new sales master plan 

How tv licked a winter sales slump 

38 Regional paint manufacturer's approach was based on thorough market 
research, spot tv. effective merchandising of campaign to the trade 

Nighttime radio's star is rising 

4-0 More clients are buying after dark. But thus far progress is gradual 
and medium must still fight "it ain't fashionable" attitude of buyers 

Radio Basics/August 

43 Monthly roundup of radio facts includes current radio set sales, and 
barometer of network radio sales this current month compared to last 



FEATURES 

18 Agency Ad Libs 

49 Film-Scope 

26 J9th and Madison 

62 News & Idea Wrap-Up 

S Newsmaker of the Week 

64 Picture Wrap-Up 

86 Sponsor Hears 

8 Sponsor-Scope 



94 Sponsor Speaks 

28 Spot Buys 

94 Ten Second Spots 

16 Timebuyers at Work 

92 Tv and Radio Newsmakers 

83 Washington Week 

22 Women's Week 



In Upcoming Issues 

Overnight ratings 

Can you project them to the national picture with a fair degree of 
accuracy? Is tin re a pattern you can use as a quick rule of thumb? 

What is station merchandising? 

Merchandising i^ one subject admen and stations disagree about fre- 
quently. One problem is: it's hard to define the term. Here's an analysis 
which should help at le i-t clarify honest-to-goodness merchandising 



Editor and Publisher 

Norman R. Glenn 

Secretary-Treasurer 

Elaine Couper Glenn 

VP-Assistant Publisher 

Bernard Piatt 

General Manager 

Arch L. Madsen 

EDITORIAL DEPARTMENT 
Executive Editor 

Miles David 
News Editor 

Ben Bodec 
Senior Editors 

Alfred J. Jaffe 
Evelyn Konrad 
Jane Pinkerton 
W. F. Miksch 

Film Editor 

Barbara Wilkens 
Assistant Editors 

Joan W. Holland 
Jack Lindrup 
Lois Heywood 
Contributing Editors 

Bob Foreman 
Joe Csida 

Art Editor 

Phil Franznlck 
Production Editor 

Erwin Ephron 

ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT 
New York Manager 

Charles W. Godwin 
Western Manager 
Edwin D. Cooper 
Southern Manager 
Herb Martin 
Midwest Manager 
Sam B. Schneider 
Mid-Atlantic Manager 
Donald C. Fuller 
Production Manager 
Jane E. Perry 

Administrative Staff 
M. Therese McHugh 
Dorris Bowers 
George Becker 

Circulation Department 

Seymour Weber 
Emily Cutillo 
Estelle Schulman 
Accounting Department 
Laura Oken 
Laura Datre 
Readers' Service 
Marilyn Hammond 



Member of Business Publications 
Audit of Circulations Inc. 



SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. 

combined with TV. Executive, Editorial, Circu- 
lation and Advertising Offices: 40 E. 49th St. 
«49th & Madison) New York 17, N. Y. Tele- 
phone: MUrray Hill 8-2772. Chicago Office: 
612 N. Michigan Ave. Phone: Superior 7-9863. L05 
Angeles Office: 6087 Sunset Boulevard. Phone: 
Hollywood 4-8089. Printing Office: 3110 Elm 
Ave., Baltimore 11. Md. Subscriptions: United 
States $3 a year. Canada and foreign S4. Sin- 
gle copies 20c. Printed in U.S.A. Address all 
correspondence ro 40 E. 49th St., N. Y. 17, 
N. Y. MUrray Hill 8-2772. Published weekly by 
SPONSOR Publications Inc. Entered as 2nd class 
matter on 29 January 1948 at the Baltimore 
postoffice under the Act of 3 March 1879. 

Copyright 1957 

Sponsor Publications Inc. 



According to Nielsen 
TV Leads in ALL Cat 



LARGEST { AUDIENCE 

OF ANY STATION IN IOWA OR ILLINOIS (outside Chicago) 



Overage Service, WOC- 
bries: Number of Homes 



Reached Monthly, Number Reached Weekly 
Weekly and Daily 
Weeklv and Daily 



J Daytime Circulation; 
Nighttime Circulation. 



Population 

Families 

Retail Solei 

Effective buying Income 

Source 

Number TV Homei 
Source 









VVOC-TV COVERAGE DATA - 



1,58^,800 

489,700 

1,9^4.984.000 

2,686,413,000 

195"* Survey of Bming Income 

( Sales Management ) 

317,902 

Advertising Research 

Foundation 




■*** 




VVOC-TV- Davenport, Iowa is part of Central Broadcasting Company which also owns and 



The Quint-Cities Station 
— Dasenport and Betten- 
dorf in Iowa: Rock Is- 
land. Moline and East 
Moline in Illinois. 



operates WHO-TV and WHO- Radio«Des Moines 

.71 1 11 17 



( <>l K. J. Palmer. 

I'residenc 
Ernest C Sanders. 

Res. Ma. 
Mark Wodlinger, 

Res. Sales Manager 
II I IRS. GRIII l\ 
WOODWARD. INC 
I \( I I 5IVE 
N \ I IONAL 
REPRESENTATIVI 



WIRED EAR 

VwlnCU rUn 



LIFE 



FROM THE ED6E OF SPACE 
t piwai s m sinum mus 

UUTK ai IMUT: IHT II IS. 
MM II 1DN FN. WHAT 10 10 



SOUND 




NBC Radio Presents An Outstanding New Ad- 
vertising Opportunity- LIFE AND THE WORLD 

Two great leaders in the news-gathering 
field, the National Broadcasting Company 
and LIFE Magazine, have combined forces 
to bring the American public an exciting 
new brand of radio journalism. 

NBC Radio takes LIFE's superb news and 
picture stories, and adds the dimension of 
sound. LIFE may cover the stratosphere 
ascent; on LIFE AND THE WORLD you 
hear the man's personal experience from his 
own lips. LIFE may picture a parrot; on 
LIFE AND THE WORLD you hear the 
parrot being interviewed. Here are the ac- 
tual voices of men who make the news or. 
react to it. Here are the sounds of hurricanes, 
of debates, of space rockets, and of momen- 
tous decisions — bringing listeners close to 
the very heart of our time. 

Increasing numbers of LIFE readers are 
discovering this fascinating NBC Radio 
program. Millions more will be introduced 
to LIFE AND THE WORLD through an 
extensive audience promotion campaign, on 
the air and in print media. 

LIFE AND THE WORLD has a choice 
position, 7:45 to 8:00 nightly, immediately 
following NBC's 7:30 pm News of the 
World, radio's highest-rated news program. 

Tune in tonight! And let your NBC Radio 
representative give you the interesting ad- 
vertising details tomorrow. 



NBC RADIO 






SPONSOR 



14 SEPTEMBER 1957 



NEWSMAKER 
of the week 



This week (*rc\ till rrlisiiiii, KOtO approaching the ranks of 

the lop 2/> agencies in overtoil billing, celebrates its huh 
anniversary. Wounded by its chairman of the hoard. Larry 
I alenstein, in his late teens, this agency marie the transition 

from a small room in the garment center tit Park tventie. 

The newsmaker: In these days of increased agency over- 
bead and frequent management turnover, I. am Valenstein, chair- 
man of the board of Gre) Advertising, represents an anachronism in 
modern industry : the founder <>f a major business celebrating ii- 
KHli birthdaj under the control of the man who started it. 

Today the Grej agenc) is billing al the rate of $45 million, with 
i lose to one-third of this billing in tv and radio. The time <>f the 
biggest expansion was in the past lime \ear-. during which the 

ii< \ better than doubled its account activity. 

"To us. the most significant 
aspect of this growth is the fact 
that it stems not from mergers, 
which arc becoming a trend in the 
service industry, but from within, 
both in terms of accounts and 
agenc] talent,* 1 Larrj \ alenstein 
told SPONSOR. "This fact becomes 
an increasingly rare one in these 
days of growing client demand for 
Ben ices and the need for ever 
more high-priced staffing. None- 
theless, at our level, we feel we 
can operate both efficiently and 
profitably ." 

The agency's current list of accounts is a far cry from it- status 
a decade or more ago, when the hulk of its billing derived from 
soft goods. But agency management feels that the merchandising 
know-how acquired in those davs has been transferred successful!) 
to such major blue-chip accounts as RC \ and NBC, Firestone. Emer- 
son, General Electric's Photo Lamp Division, P&G's l.ilt and other-. 

Today Grej Advertising emplovs some "i2~> people, tank- it-elf 
about average in terms of profit, with no single client accounting 
for more than 10'- of the total agency billing. 

I li is has its drawbacks in the modern operation, because each 
account needs separate staffing, that results in a duplication of high- 
salaried talent." savs \ alenstein. ""Hut we feel it also ha- it- com- 
pensations for the agency and client. For the client it guarantees 
greater objectivity, and for agencv management, greater -tal>ilitv. 
One account change doesn't mean mass firin^ 

According to such agencv colleagues as Gre\ president \rthur 
Fatt i associated with the agencv for 36 years), there are two t rait- 
in Larry \ alenstein that haven't changed since he started the shop 
at age 18: his optimism and energy. 

"Only thing is that I catch an earlier train home." he told 
SPONSOR. His normal: the ">:44 or b:0\ to Scarsdale. ^ 



SPONSOR • 14 SEPTEMBER 195, 




Lam Valenstein 



Buying 
'sets -in -use 



// 



or 
ears-in-use 7 



of h«'' 
personality I" 

A ho 

turn- in their ears and 
minds w hen they tune in 
their radios KNX-( BS 
award-vt inning m 
programs, i omplete spi 

i rage, liv< ind 

dramatic offerii draw 

people who ' hat 

and you — offer. 
That's another reason the 

-1 radio .station in Southern 
California is 6 

KNX • LOS ANGELES 




-•• 







SPONSOR • 14 SEPTEMBER 1951 




BURGESS 
MEREDITH 



World famous for his stage and screen portrayals. . . acclaimed by critics 
and audiences . . . Burgess Meredith now makes his first regular appear- 
ance on TV as host and narrator of the NEW "BIG STORY." 

Top rated against every kind of competition . . . commended by outstand- 
ing church, civic and government leaders . . . winner of a host of national 
awards . . . "THE BIG STORY," now in its tenth year on radio and TV, 
remains unmatched for audience reaction . . . publicity . . . top sponsor 
results. 

NOW, the new "Big Story' - -as exciting as today's front page— taki 

behind the headlines of America's top newspapers with thrilling, dra- 
matic, inspiring stories told in vivid documentary style. 

PRODUCED BY A PYRAMID PRODUCTIONS 
Executive Producer - Everett Rosenthal 



Call the man from 



m OFFICIAL FILMS 

^■JP^ 25 West 45th Street . New York 36. Ne< 



INC. 

w York 



PL«j 70100 



REPRESENTATIVES IN 

Beverly Hills. Chicago. Dallas, S.m Kr.n.i-, St 1 in, Atlanta. Philadelphia 




STORY 



77 



SPONSOR • 14 SEPTEMBER 1957 




our vision includes SCENTAVISION 



Today, television pictures your product. Tomorrow, 
"scentavision" on television may release it's fragrance 
(like this page) and add wonderful new sensory appeal to 
food and cosmetic advertising. This bold concept of 
"scentavision" reflects the forward thinking of WGAL-TV 
toward providing more effective service for its advertisers 
and viewers in America's 10th TV market — the market of 



• 3Vi million people 

• in 1,015,655 families 

• owning 917,320 TV sets 

• earning $6 ] A billion annually 

• buying consumer goods that add up to 
$3% billion annually in retail sales 



CHANNEL 8 MULT I- CITY MARKET 



WGAL-T 



LANCASTER, P 

w ana UBS 



STEINMAN STATION 
Clair McCollough, Pres. 




Representative The MEEKER Company, Inc. New York • Chicago • Los Angeles • San Francisco 
8 SPONSOR • 14 SEPTEMBER 1957 



1/.. ( H ml" ant /( nn,[ rii'lm 

u ith interpretation 
in depth jot busy readeri 



SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC 



SPONSOR-SCOPE 



14 September | |, r dominant medium ha* changed from radio i<> t\. hut one cliche has stood 

Cepyrlght 1957 . . 

the test <>t Mir intervening years. 

Picked up this week l\ SP0NS0R-SC0P1 ' n Wenue discussion : 

I'IKSI iGENCYMAN: "Alright, so m to head u Now 

l.'i the important thing: What sort of character arc we going to give 1 1 1 i — singei ' 
SECOND IGENCYMAN: -\\ ill swei Call Carroll Carroll." 



It"* going to !»«■ a real horse race thi* year between a quartet of major agencies 
for Iv network leadership. 

\- ihc\ line up at the gate for 1957-58, You alreadj have a tie among three top* 
notcher* for the No. I "agency-of-record" title. 

\- you <an see below, Y&R, JWT, and BBDO eacl 
11 hv I evening network programs. 

Aside from such an unusual neck-and-neck situation, there's this signifr le: 

JWT looms as possible leader in t\ billings for the current year — and it not 

now. then very likely the year after. 

This tabulation of agency of record network progran 
thi- week I.n SPONSOR-SCOPE from the agencies themselves: 

IGENC5 NO. WKLY. EVE SHOWS NO. DAYTIME ' : I 1 SPECIALS 

Young & Rubicam L7 29 

J. Walter Thompson 17 21 7 

BBDO 17 9 

McCann-Erickson '» 10 

After a close look at barter. McCann-Erickson find- that practical!) even 
one of the film companies i- interested in exploring the device. 
The agency's report includes these observations: 

• Sucre— ful barter ileal- often involve less "desirable" r* clients or those with no 
previous t% history. 

• Their product* appeal primarily to Rimini hence dayti table 
t<> them. 

• From a media standpoint, barter takes place mainly in "fringe" lime. 

• Barter deals lack one of the great virtues of Bpol — flexibility ince no pro- 
visions are made lor schedule improvement, ■ incellations, or 

(See FILM-SCOPE, pa-.- 19, for McCan • 



RCA has made this an important directive for M'»< Radio sales: Revive the 
interest of NBC TV advertisers in simulcasting 'heir li\< shows. 

Madison Avenue V guess for the motive behind this move: Prestige. 

The Groucho Marx Show was the last of the NBC simu ■:. of course. Gil- 

lette's Fridav Night Fight- ' . 

\mid all the clamor that agencies oupht to produce more t\ shows, one cur- 
rentl) is doing something about it: McCann-Erickson. 

The program is an alternate ueeklv half- hour varietj job I • I iggett S Myi 
brand (via NBC T\ I. < ost: |55,000-$60, ekly. 



SPONSOR • 14 SEPTEMBER 1957 






SPONSOR-SCOPE continued . . . 

INBC TV apparently won't formally press for additional payment for color 
this season. 

A SPONSOR-SCOPE inquiry brought this information: 

• Color costs are being recovered from some regular accounts but not from 
others. 

• One group of advertisers definitely paying extra for color are the Perry Como Show 
participants. 

• Color as a rule has been incorporated in the package price on specials. 

NBC TV contends that the daytime viewing potential increases when a network 
replaces service programing with entertainment. 

In January of this year the network made just that sort of a change, and here's what 
happened to sets in use: 

10 TO 11 A.M. 
PERIOD SETS IN USE % CHANGE 

Jan.-June 1956 13.5 

Jan.-June 1957 13.9 +3% 

11 A.M. TO 12 NOON 

Jan.-June 1956 15.6 

Jan.-June 1957 18.0 +15% 

Probably the longest talent contract of the current season is the 45-pager com- 
pleted this week between Frank Sinatra's Hobart Productions, Inc. and Liggett 
& Myers. 

The agreement calls for the production of 36 half-hour and two one-hour shows. Sinatra 
will star on 28 and host the rest. Six of the shows will be repeated. Average gross cost 
to the sponsor: $59,000. 

Ford will spend about $400,000 for audience promotion of its various tv 
vehicles this season. 

The allotments will be along these lines : 

• About $35,000 each for the five Desi Arnez specials. 

• About $75,000 apiece for the season on the Ernie Ford, Zane Grey, and Suspicion 
programs. 

The promotion budget for the Arnez quintet is close to 9% of the cost for time 
and talent. 

Just because westerns are such bullish fare, don't sell the quiz short. 
Note how close a run for top spot the quizzes give the westerns in this comparative 
analysis of Nielsen average ratings based on the August 1957 report: 

PROGRAM TYPE NO. PROGRAMS AVERAGE RATING 

Western 5 20.3 
Quiz 13 20.1 
Mysteries 9 19.9 
General Drama 17 16.6 
Adventure 8 16.5 
Situation Comedy 15 16.2 
Variety (% hr.) 6 15.7 
Note: The average for all 30-minute evening programs for August was 17.0, com- 
pared to 16.3 for August 1956. On the other hand, the average for 60-minute pro- 
grams dropped from 23.1 to 20.3. 

Even with second-run films, ABC TV's Tuesday night strength has held up 
through the summer months. Nielsen's average audience share for August shows: 

ABC TV. with five half-hour programs, 39.8%: CBS TV, with seven half-hour shows, 
37.1%: and NBC, with but four half-hour shows, 38.6%. 

10 SPONSOR • 14 SEPTEMBER 1957 



. 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 



ifter h|m»i radio tests in three markets, Revlon iliink- it hai i strong eon« 
tender in it- firfl entry into the male toiletriet field — Top BraM hair tonic. 

I In- initial probe will be followed up \siili some more radio buys In the Far Weal, 
Kmil Mogul i^ the agency . 

\U( and Mutual are the first customers of I'ul-i >'s Forthcoming network radio 
rating report. 

Tin- initial result will be oul in November. The) will be based on 26 markets, chi 
l>\ Pulse because li the) are in the thick of competition, and 2) the) compose aboul 
I0 r ; of the nation'- radio homes. 

NBC T\ this week hammered awaj al a thesis Detroit more and more is be- 
ginning to accept: That i\ i* the dominant medium for selling cars. 

NBC's approach is \i.i ;i surve) idvertesl conducted among 1,496 cat shoppers and 
buyers and 1,056 dealers. 

In releasing the data, NBC drove home this question : Whj does Detroit spend onlj 
a little more than a third of its ad budget <>»i tv, when media-preferences anion:: 
buyers and dealers run so predominately in favor of tv? 
Here are a couple <>f samples from tlir 3urvej : 

What hind of advertising got the II Imi kind of advertising does the 
haver most interested in the make? best i<>f> for the deal 

Magazines 16.4^ Magazines 6.29! 

Newspapers 10.8^ Newspapers 127.1', 

Television 1-5.3% Television 64.395 

Question of the week among media people: Is Detroit*- flooding of radio stations 
during October and November clogging up spot opportunities for other 

riallv in the kev markets? 

Indications have come from some Madison Vvenue agencies thai this Btate of mind 
has tended to slow down action on spot placements For the time being. 

Network radio continued to hloom at CRS and \RC this week. 

Biggest transaction was Sun Oil's renewal of Lowell Thomas for 52 weeks, netting 
CHS about $1.5 million in lime and talent. Meantime Rell Telephone continued its 
Hour for another 39 weeks on \'RC fmuch to CBS' admitted chagrii 
around .'52."i0.nno net in time billings. 

Other network sales: 

CBS: H. J. Heinz. fi\e 5-minute segments of Impart for 10 weel 
Philip Morris. 25 minutes of country music Friday nights; Chrvsler, five Fmi 
ments a week For seven weeks; Chevrolet, two additional newsi ists i week for tv 

\RC: \nahist. 13 one-minute participations in Monitor a • 
0001; Wavcrlv Bond Fabrics. 20 five-minute segments a week for 13 w< "0.0001 : 

R. T. French Birdseed, two minute- a week in My True Ston for 13 wed-: Carter, fivo 
minutes a week distributed anions various programs For 2l • three v 

ness from Lever Bros., amounting to ahour ^00.000. 

Pelry this week continued it« "crusade'' for nighttime radio h\ the brochure 
route — a S.S-paeer entitled "Two for the Money with Nighttime Radio." It argu 

• Nighttime radio audiences are onh a shade smaller than daytime — in 
thev are on a nar with afternoon audiences. 

• Listening is surprisingly prime tv time, reaching their height between 8 and 
a.m. 

• The nichttime radio audience is a family audience. 

(See SPONSOR'S article on s kindred theme. Nighttime RaHi.>"» 5 Rising, page 

40.^ 

SPONSOR • 14 SEPTEMBER 1957 11 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 



NBC Radio this week moved once more to align its rate card with the latest methods 
of doing business: It emphasizes participations; and it hasieally considers five-minute 
periods as "programs." 

Quoting Joe Culligan to SPONSOR-SCOPE: "We've cut away from what has be- 
come an artificial pattern and put today methods of selling network radio in their true 
and practical perspective." 

Participations are offered at these gross one-time rates: 1 minute. SI. 000; 30 
seconds. $750: and 6 seconds, $250. 

Earl) last month NBC Radio submitted a new contract to its affiliates based primarily 
on a participation economy. 

In a bid for nighttime program sales. NBC Radio's new rate card provides a spe- 
cial discount for segments bought after 8 p.m. The price: 75% of the basic rates. 

The network told SPONSOR-SCOPE this week that it was on the verge of selling two 
nighttime quarter-hour strips, each of which would start in Januarv. 

NBC Spot Sales is offering a rate slightly below daytime for advertisers who 
sponsor their own programs after 8 p.m., Monday through Friday. 

The inducement is part of the group's new rate card (which otherwise calls for a single 
participation rate day and night, including weekends). 

Madison Avenue philosophers were speculating this week what team President 
Eisenhower is playing on. 

What started it was the President's statement at a press conference that one way to curb 
inflation is to get people to reduce purchases by buying selective^ . 

To modern marketers this poses an ancient timing problem. For them the big 
task is getting up steam when consumer buying starts to lag — as it is in some lines 
right now. 

Though reluctant to establish the precedent. ABC TV this week granted BBDO the 
right to make spot arrangements for Campbell Soup's Colt .45 and Revlon's 
Walter Winchell File. 

These placements, of course, will be in markets where the network itself has been 
unable to get clearances. 

ABC TV expects to have this situation cleared up by the first of the year when it 
will have affiliates of its own in all major markets. 

MCA this week brought the reps up-to-date on a proposition that the talent and 
producing: organization is trvinq: to sell tv stations: 

• MCA will sell a spot to a national advertiser in an MCA syndicated show at 
the station's Class "A" minute rate. 

• As compensation for that spot, the station would have the right to sell the other 
two commercial positions in the MCA package. 

CBS TV this week put the official seal on loosening up product adjacency pro- 
tection — something which has been developing piecemeal since January. I See 2 

Februarv and 6 Julv SPONSOR-SCOPE.) 

Sales v.p. Bill Hylan savs the chanses were made to CD bring the protection pattern 
into keeping with modern industrial expansion and diversification, and C2) provide 
more flexibility. 

For other news coverage in this issue, see Newsmaker of the Week, pasre 5: 
Film-scope, page 49: Spot Buys, page 28: News and Idea W rap-Up. page 62: Washington 
Week, page 83: sponsor Hears, page 86: and Tv and Radio Newsmakers, page 92. 

12 SPONSOR • 14 SEPTEMBER 1957 



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SPONSOR 



14 SEPTEMBER 1957 



13 



THE GRAY GHOST 









Excitement-charged as a cavalry 
raid, THE GRAY GHOST dramatizes 
the life and legend of one of the 
Civil War's great soldier-statesmen, 
dashing Colonel John S. Mosby. 




THE GRAY GHOST, starring Tod 
Andrews, documents the true-life 
adventures of Colonel Mosby and 
his famed Raiders, daredevils on 
horseback whose fearless exploits 
behind the Union lines comprise 
one of the most eventful chapters 
in America's colorful history. 

Epic in scope, universal in appeal— 
THE GRAY GHOST (39 half-hours) 
has already been sold to such major 
regional advertisers as Habitant 
Soups (throughout New England), 
Loblaw food chain (upper New York 
State and Erie) and Colonial Stores 
(Virginia, the Carolinas, Georgia 
and Alabama). ::: Other territories are 
going fast, so act quickly. Call . . . 

CBS TELEVISION FILM SALES, INC @ 

". . . the best film programs for all stations" 



*Also signed are Welch Grape Juice; Gunther Beer; Sears, 
Roebuck; Freihofer Baking Co.; Block Drug Co.; Adams Dairy; 
Foley's Department Store (Houston) and many others. 






SOUTHERN 

CALIFORNIA 

INTERURBIA 

SANtJl 



BARBARA 




SAN BERNARDINO • 



RIVERSIDE • 



PALM SPRINGS • 



LOS ANGELES 



IS COVERED BY 
only^ ft stations 

7 

SAN DIECO» 

r " 



IMPERIAL VALLEY [> 



INTERURBIA ... a complex of 
cities, towns, suburbias which 
have grown together . . ." is startlingly 
illustrated in the solidly packed strip 
from Santa Barbara through 
Los Angeles and San Bernardino- 
Riverside to San Diego. 

NCS #2 CONFIRMS individual city 
ratings . . . only 3 radio stations 
are popular and powerful enough 
to deliver complete this multi-million 
super-market. 

OF THIS TOP TRIO, KBIC is 

• the only independent 

• the least expensive station 

• LOWEST in cost-per-thousand 
by one yardstick 

• SECOND by the other. 

Any KBIC or Weed man would like 
to show you the documents. 




KBIG 

The (alalina Station 
10,000 Watts 

740 "VJr 



JOHN POOLE BROADCASTING CO. 

6540 Sunset Blvd.. Lo« Angeles 28, California 
Tolophono: Hollywood 3-3705 

Nat. Rep. WEED and Company 






16 




Timebuyers 
at work 




Felice Feldman, Roj (jam Advertising Agency, New York, says 
that radio is being reborn daily to thousands of small advertisers 
who are realizing the value of a well planned and integrated adver- 
tising program. "In selecting time and station for the small local 
advertiser." Felice says, "the most important factor is the charac- 
ter of the audience to be reached. 
Small advertisers often sell prod- 
ucts or services that are of use 
only to certain groups or have lim- 
ited distribution. So 'who will the 
product appeal to?' and 'where and 
when are you most likely to find 
your customers?' must be careful- 
ly considered."' Felice feels that 
"spillage" into other towns and 
states on high-watt stations is use- 
less to the local advertiser. Even 
if he reaches a large audience at a 
low cost-per-1,000, it's often the wrong audience. The local audi- 
ence — his customers — usually turn to the local station for news and 
advertising. "Above all," Felice says, "the small advertiser must 
allot sufficient time for his advertising to have impact. A one-shot 
venture is worthless. Consistency and frequency are necessary." 



Lester J. Blumenthal, executive vice president and timebuying 
chief. Product Services, Inc., New York, thinks that "today's buyer 
must first be a good salesman. He must develop, in this flexible tv 
period, a plan to bring in the greatest possible audience to his client 
for the least possible cost, fight for the best possible times — and sell 

the project to the station. This 
calls for an active 'buyer-salesman' 
rather than a passive 'what-can- 
you-offer? attitude." Lester savs 
that the agency is currently selling 
52-week tv to both stations and 
clients; the advertiser benefits 
from full-time exposure, the sta- 
tion benefits from the long-term 
contract. Already they've set up 
year-round plans for top accounts, 
at a cost of little more than their 
previous seasonal-saturation bud- 
gets. This has been accomplished. Lester savs, through new and 
improved approaches to buying that the agency's developed; also it's 
been able to negotiate advantageousK with the stations because of 
the long-term business. "Long-term buying." Lester adds, "must be 
carefulh tailored to fulfill each client's marketing objectives through- 
out the year, with special consideration for the seasonal factors." 




SPONSOR 



14 SEPTEMBER 1957 



Only 22 

quarter hours 

don't 

belong 

to 

WTIX. 

The 
other 266 do, 




The latesl Pulsi W'l'l \ .1 \ irl ual 

i irleans radio < 

from Monda ■■ t In 
WTIX 

Thus a ii'-u dimension ol domi 
nance is added i" W'l'l X 'k eonl inuii 
and widening leadership among NTew Orli 
1 1 radio stal ions. 
Thi mosl recenl (Jul} August Hooper shows WTIX in first 
place with -■'• '!', over twice the runner-up station's 111', 

Storz Station round-tl lock exeitemenl and ideas have created ;i new New 

Orleans listening habit, with new time buying habits to match. Spare the Adam 
Young man a little time oul of your daj to tell you win you gel nothing bul 

■j I times oul of WTIX's day. (, i-. talk to WTIX general manager F\ B i 

thelson. 



WTIX 



first in list at ion NEW ORLEANS 




Is^Uc gVsj 


WDGY Minneapolis St. Paul 
WHB Kansas City 




WQAM Miami 

REPRESENTED BY JOHN BLAIR & CO. 


5-^ | y^x 1 ICDFslSB 


TODAY'S RADIO FOR TODAY'S SELLING [£ 




WTIX /Ve 

REPRESENTED BY ADAM YOUNG INC. 



SPONSOR • 14 SEPTEMBER 1957 



17 




SHE'S a friend 
of a friend 
of yours. She 
shares your fondness 
for KOIN-TV's 
coverage of 
Portland, Oregon, 
and 30 neigh- 
boring counties. 
When you 
whisper sweet 
somethings thru 
KOIN-TV, 
she listens . . . 
and reacts. 
The gentle- 
men from 
CBS-TV 
Spot Sales 
carry tales 
about her 
habits . . . 
and about 
KOIN-TV's 
incredible 
ratings. 



18 



by Bob Foreman 



Agency ad libs 




The cul de sac of creative management 

John Orr Young, who gets top hilling in the 
ad agency known as Young & Ruhicam. was 
walking toward the New Haven R.R.'s 8:11 out 
of Saugatuck and. as is natural in the environs 
of that adman s commuter train, talking ahout 
the ad business. He was glad to see. he stated, 
that an ex-copy writer had ascended to the 
throne in the shop that gives me desk space and 
in commenting on the wisdom of such a move he listed several other 
former creative gents who were calling the shots up and down Madi- 
son, North Michigan Avenue and westward. The point Mr. Young 
was making was that, in his opinion, this was a healthy thing for 
the business in general. Which, of course, didn't curry any ill- 
favor with your jovial reporter whose background is rich with 
graphite and tissue-pad. 

After boarding the train, however. I started to compare the 
glories of being an Ad-Land Executive and Part-of-Management"s- 
Team versus the simple charm of being a swashbuckling, pencil- 
in-ear copy man. 

Maybe it's un-American, certainly it's heresy but my mind kept 
toying with the thought that maybe there should be a wax of 
relegating the top slot to a modestly salaried hired hand who isn t 
really the star performer himself. The prize fighter and the race 
horse and the champion dog have somebody see to it that the 
training table's got good food and the rent is paid and nobody 
steals any towels. 

Management must cover the details 

When you come right down to it. a lot of management thinking 
has to be on this level. There's the rent I those wonderful discus- 
sions of cost per square foot and if we add storage space in Cleve- 
land should we sign a 99- or 78-year lease? I. There's The Retire- 
ment Plan ( which never produced an ad or a commercial but takes 
more time to prepare than the three best campaigns in history). 
There's the Outside Office Situation ( which soniedax will require 
office buildings to be hollow cylinders I . All of which is topped 1>\ 
The Big Management Dilemma — does the tv department reallx need 
a movieola? 

Perhaps this sounds like the busx daj of a diseased mind — or 
a badh run agency. But do not kid yourself, sir. In a personal 
business such as ours personnel is big business. Even the largest 
of agencies have verv few employees compared to a manufacturing 
concern. Of these few employees more than half are concerned with 
work that is also being done in banks and beaut} shops and bookie 
joints I secretaries, bookkeepers, receptionists, phone girls, etc. I — 
in other words, not with advertising. So the prexy of the ad agencx 
darn well better have the answer for his ad makers as to why Old 
So and So got the outside office for here comes 1 oung So and So 
with blood in his eye. \nd he better have the answer about tbe 



Sl'ONSOli 



14 SEPTEMBER 1957 



9 




»'hen the winners in The Billboard's 5th 
i nial TV Program & Talent Awards poll 
ere totaled, we discovered that KDKA-TV 

>w is carrying (or has completed showing 
of the season's prize-winning Syndi- 
»ted Shows! 

In 6 major program award categories*, 
.DKA-TV's audience has viewed 50 of the 
5 top programs! 

We believe these figures will give you a 



good idea why people in Greater Pittsburgh 

and surrounding counties axe in the huhit of 
tuning to KDKA-TV They've developed 
this viewing habit because KDKA-TV makes 
a habit of bringing them the best available 
entertainment. 

People like what they see and hear on 
KDKA-TV, and they respond by buying our 
advertisers' products. That's why in 

Pittsburgh . . . no selling campaign is com- 
plete without the WBC station . . . 



•KDKA-TV $ LIST OF PRIZE-WINNING SHOWS 

BEST OVER-ALL SYNDICATED 

SHOW WINNERS . 5 out of 5 

Best Comedy Series 8 out of 10 

Best Dramatic Series 8 out of 10 

Best Adventure Series 9 out of 10 

Best Mystery Series . 10 out of 10 

Best Western Series 10 out of 10 



CHANNEL 2 IS NO. 1 IN 






W EST I N G H U S E BROADCASTING COMPANY, INC 

RADIO BOSTON, WBZ+WBZA • PITTSBURGH, KDKA • CLEVELAND. KY « . FORT WAYNE, VV0W0 

CHICAGO. WIND • PORTLAND. KEX • TELEVISION BOSTON, ABZV . BALTIMORE, WJZ-TV 

PITTSBURGH, KDKA-TV • CLEVELAND, KTWYV • SAN FRANCISCO, KPIX 

WIND represented by AM Radio Soles • WJZ-TV represented by Bloir.TV • Kfx repres : : . "■ - Inc. 

All other WBC stations represen'ec by Pete's. Griffin, Woodward, Inc. 



THE MIDDLE OF 
WASHINGTON STATE 




WENATCHEE 



5000 
-560k 



w 



&& 1 






Programs have to BE popular, and RE- 
MAIN popular to stay on KPQ. We aim 
directly at the people of central Wash- 
ington, with SELECTED PROGRAMS 
ONLY from three networks, plus local 
news shows, farm, homemaker, and 
specialty shows . . . and seasonal 
sports, presently including hometown 
Northwest league baseball. We give 
'em what they want! And spots just 
seem to slide in there so natural-like, 
no matter what adjacencies or partici- 
pations you're looking tor. 




WENATCHEE, WASHINGTON 
"Apple Capital of the World" 
Affiliated with 3 networks 

National Reps: Seattle & Portland Reps: 
Forjoe & Co., Inc. Art Moore & Assoc. 

National Sales: 

Pat O'Halloran 

NOrmandy 3-5121 

Wenatchee 

WE GUARANTEE 

to outpull all other Northcentral 
Washington media 2 to I 



20 



Agency ad libs continued 



signing of that 99-year lease in Des Moines just before the office 
folded. 

There's another aspect to consigning topnotch creative men to 
top management slots well worth thinking about, even if nothing 
can be done about it. Put simply — what a waste! Such a squander- 
ing of talent, so rare a commodity in a business that long ago faced 
a talent-drought! 

One quick glance at any magazine, a few minutes of viewing on 
any tv channel or listening to the radio is all that is needed to 
convince any sound judge of what is good advertising that there's 
a desperate shortage of creative savvy. 

G.B.S. once said — he who can, does; he who cannot, teaches. For 
the ad biz that might well be paraphrased to: he who can is put 
into a job where he can't possibly. ^ 



THE MECHANICS OF MANAGEMENT 



pipe/ye v/aBcr 





CCAPPZB&K, 



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$£TH/€£N COFFIB 
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MRANUS, A4HDAES 

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Table °f organization, developed by sponsor's research staff, allows the large, 
multi-departmented agency to deal neatly with every-day administrative detail. 



% 



always 
first in 

syndicated 

film 

shows, 

now... 




'THE GRAY GHOST" 

Timed perfectly (or the current resurgence of 
interest in the Civil War, this tremendous new series 
brings to TV the story of a band of adventurous 
heroes, captained by the legendary John S. Mosby. 



'HARBOR COMMAND" 

Brand new adventure series, bringing to TV the 
thrilling stories of America's Harbor Police, Coast Guard 
units and Port Authorities. Starring Wendell Cory. 



'FRONTIER DOCTOR" 

An exciting new series, combining the adventure 

and excitement of the early West. 

Starring Rex Allen in the role of the Frontier Doctor. 



'JUNGLE JIM" 

Johnny Weismuller, Mr. Jungle himself, leads 
expeditions from the Amazon to New Guinea. Together 
with champion chimpanzee Tamba and an all-star 
cast, Jungle Jim will appeal to viewers of every age. 



a^***^ 



movies are better than ever 



0*0 



MM-, 




/UaJ 



and now 



oJl**^ 



"MILLION DOLLAR MOVIES" are better.than ever 

n 

On "Million Dollar Movie," September 9th, 

WCAU-TV kicks off the greatest parade of "post-1952" full length 

features ever released for television. 

"AFRICAN QUEEN" (1952, starring Humphrey Bogart) 
"MOULIN ROUGE" (1953. starring Jose Ferrer) 
"SUDDENLY" (1954, starring Frank Sinatra) 
"PURPLE PLAIN" (1955, starring Gregory Peck) 

plus other Class A films starring Gary Cooper, John Wayne, 

Tony Curtis, Gina Lollobrigida and many others of the same calibre! 



Capitalize on this tremendous array of 
audience-getting programming (backed 
by the most spectacular promotion ever 
aimed at the vast Philadelphia 
TV audience). Contact: 

WCAU-TV 



CHANNE 



JO 



CBS IN PHILADELPHIA 



Represented by CBS-TV SPOT SALES 



SPONSOR • 14 SEPTEMBER 1957 



21 



— 




WEST VIRGINIA 

DAIRY 
INCREASES 

SALES 500%! 



LEATHERWOOD DAIRY, Blue- 
field, W. Va., conducted a 
two-day promotion using THE 
CISCO KID plastic tumbler as 
a premium with a half-gallon 
of milk. They write: 

"Results were tremen- 
dous . . . in a two-day 
period, 15,000 Bluefield 
families bought the special 
half -gallon carton. This 
means Leatherwood Milk 
was sold to 74% of the 
families in our area thanks 
to THE CISCO KID. We're 
looking forward to many 
more profitable promotions 
with this powerful show." 

Ask to see more success stories of 

TUB WORLDS GREATEST SALESMAN! 

"THE CISCO KID" 



<S*e/eetois0& 



22' 






News and views for women in 
advertising and wives of admen 



Women's week 



Oh that budget! \<>u that summei is past, wives <>f agencymen 
are confronted with the fall dilemma: (1) more home entertaining 
is required in the fall: l2l wardrobes need replenishing; (3) doing 
both can strain a budget. 

Here are some tips on entertaining at home without expending 
excessive energies or moneys: 

1. Formal dinner parties are always impressive, but can be han- 
dled for reasonable sums. Major wardrobe tip: Evening-length 
woolen plaid at-home skirts are the going trend of the season. These 
can be varied with different sweaters or shirts that serve double <la\- 
time dut\ . 

2. Most important menu tip: as cool weather approaches, hot 
stewed meats are an in-order, economy-wise dish. The surest way to 
dress up such dishes is to plan curries, with side dishes of shaved 
cocoanut, chutney, ground nuts. The cost will be well under the 
price of chops or steaks and dinner will look more elegant. 

3. To keep down the liquor bills, plan on a round or two of cock- 
tails before dinner, and wine with the meal. W ives experienced in 
at-home dinner parties guarantee that a dinner-time wine cuts post- 
dinner drinking in half. 

Ladies tops in media: It's rumored that the West Coast looks 
more kindly at lady executives than \e\<- York. Another proof of 
this premise is in the mid-September appointment of Mary Ferriter 
as media director of Guild. Bascom & Bonfigli. San Francisco. 

"W e have lots of respect for the female's ability in advertising." 
says GB&B's Dave Bascom. "Miss Ferriter will be a media director 
on a level with the agency's other three media directors, two of 
whom are women." 

GB&B's media directors now will be Mary Ferriter. Peg Harris. 
Marce Sanders, along with the sole male media director. Dick Tyler. 

"But we don't discriminate against men."' Bascom assured 
SPONSOR. "Rod MacDonald is the v. p. in charge of media."" 

Before joining GB&B. Marx was media manager at Botsford. Con- 
stantine & Gardner. San Francisco. Her GB&B accounts will be 
Heidelberg Beer, Max Factor and Breast-O'-Chicken. Mary moved 
into advertising eight years ago. 

Pro award for lady broadcaster: The "Woman of Achievement 
\ward" given by the Business and Professional Woman's Club of 
Philadelphia has just been voted to Margaret Mary Kearney, educa- 
tional director of WCAl . Philadelphia. 

This award "seeks to honor the woman, who. by her own efforts, 
has made a genuine contribution within her professional field, to the 
advancement in service of all women. Presentation of the award 
is scheduled at a 2(> September dinner in the Barclay Hotel. 

Margaret's list of awards has grown by four in the past four 
months, since she was also named •"Woman of the ^ear by the 
Philadelphia Chapter of the Immaculata College Alumnae, and re- 
ceived three other awards from her professional colleagues. 









SPONSOR 



14 SEPTEMBER 1957 



Why be just part 
of the Parade..? 



Today it's increasingly 

hard to stand out from the crowd. 
For every television station 
on the air five years ago 
there are now four more! 
And, at mid-1957, another 350 
commercial applications were still 
pending for yet more stations. 

As the parade grows bigger, 

it takes something special to preserve 
.//"/'/• identity at the 
agency-advertiser level . . . 
to be known for the 
individuality that makes you 
outstanding in your own market. 

Ordinary production line 

representation won't do it. 

Without specialized selling, you're just 

part of an ever-lengthening parade 

your representative tries to "represent.' 

Quality television stations with 

hard-won local leadership, 

proud of their community reputations, 

deserve something more. 



They (jet it, too, 

from Harrington, Righter and Parsons- 
where specialized representation 
makes so much difference. 

We're (/lad to explain how. 




HARRINGTON, 
RIGHTER 
& PARSONS, Inc. 

NEW YORK • CHICAGO 
SAN FRANCISCO 'ATLANTA* BOSTON 




television — ihr only mrrfium we terve 



WCDA-B-C WABT Birmingham WBEN-TV /; flalo 

WJRT WFMY-TV 

WTPAHarrisburg WTIC-TV// WDAF-TV 

WHAS-TV i WTMJ-TV WUwauke, WMTW u irnshington 

WRVA-TV Richmond WSYR-T V Syracuse 



SPONSOR • 14 SEPTEMBER 1957 



2t 




JUST OUT. . . and alread 




SOLD IN 20 MARKETS ) 

TO GRIESEDIECK BEER AND OTHER SPONSORS! j/r , 




AMOUS GUEST STARS LIKE THESE IN EVERY SHOW! 

For details contact W your nearest office. 



9. 



GEMS, INC 



TELEVISION SUBSIDIARY OF COLUMBIA PICTURES CORP. 
711 FIFTH AVENUE, NEW YORK, N. Y. 



NEW YORK DETROIT 

711 Fifth Ave. 709FoxBldg. 

Plaza 1-4432 Woodward 1-3979 



CHICAGO 
230 N. Michigan Ave. 

Franklvn 2-3696 



HOLLYWOOD 

1334 N. Beechwood Dr. 

HoUvwood2-3111 



NEW ORLEANS 
Si 

Express ; 



TORONTO 
B Peter St 
Empire 3-4096 



\ 



f4if 

W! 



I 



IT'S NO 
ACCIDENT 

There are 
many 

Reasons 

WHY 

KWKW 

BROADCASTS 
MORE HOURS OF 
SPANISH RADIO 
THAN ANY 
OTHER STATION 
IN THE U.S. 

All Day 



AND 

All Night 

(21 HOURS) 

"573,000 Spanish Speaking 
people listen to KWKW in 
the L.A. area. 

These Spanish Speaking An- 
gelenos spend over one and 
two-thi-ds MILLION Dollars 
per day! 

More than 319 Advertisers 
have used KWKW profitably 
for one year or more. 



PASADENA* LOS ANCCIIS , 

V . Spanish Language \ 
>. Station ■ S 



L.A.— RYan 1-6744 

S.F.— Theo B. Hall 

Eastern Rep. — National Time Sales 



49th and 
Madison 



26 



New and Renew 

Under "Renewed on Radio Networks," 
the address of Allis-Chalmers is given 
as Harvey. III. I August 24 issue i . The 
company does have a plant there, hut 
the main office is in Milwaukee. 

In the interest of accuracy, best re- 
gards. 

Gerald L. Seaman, 
radio & tv director, 
Bert S. Gittins Advertising, Milivaukee 

Film shows in Puerto Rico 

Under the section titled Film-Scope 
on page 78 (31 August issue) you 
refer to the success of syndicated pro- 
grams in Puerto Rico and you quote 
as a source Telepulse 1957 whereas 
four of the top 15 programs are film 
imports dubbed in Spanish. I should 
like to refer you to Telepulse dated 
June 1957 of Puerto Rico whereby six 
of the top 15 shows are syndicated 
shows revoked into Spanish of which, 
we are humbly proud, that four of the 
lop 15 are ZIV Shows. 

I should further add that in our 
opinion Film-Scope is doing a very fine 
job and makes very interesting read- 
ing and every one of our executives 
here at Ziv opens to this section first. 
Edward J. Stern 
President 
ZIV International 

Movie men and radio 

I read with great interest your article 
in the August 24th issue of sponsor 
by Gordon McLendon "Movie men 
don't know how to use radio". To put 
an up-to-date ending on this story, I 
would like to state that Cinema Arts 
Theatres in San Antonio are now using 
KONO Radio as their exclusive radio 
nutlet and are doing a bigger and 
more profitable business than ever with 
their four theatres, the Texas Theatre, 
Josephine, Woodlawn, and Laurel. 

10 years ago, in 1947. KONO had 
saturation schedules on the San Pedro 
Outdoor Theatre, and for several 
straight years the Theatre enjoyed 
Mine of the biggest gross billings in 
this part of the countrj : so saturated 



radio and result getting radio definitely 
is not new for theatre men who know 
how to properly use the radio. 

Jack Roth. 

manager, KONO, San Antonio 

Please send me and bill me for four 
copies of the August 24th issue. Your 
story on "Movie Men Don't Know How 
To Use Radio" was excellent. I am 
very much afraid that some of the 
movie men are still living in the 30's 
as far as advertising goes. They install 
popcorn, air conditioning equipment, 
soft chairs, stick up stills, etc., but the 
radio copy . . . SAD . . . SAD. Maybe 
this will wake them up . . . 

Joe Milsop 

manager, WCP A, Clearfield, Pa. 

Identifying new products 

I have been passing my copy of SPON- 
SOR on to our production people a 
week or two late and. even though late, 
it has proved the only reliable source 
they have for tracing out new brand 
names in both network and spot. Our 
problem is knowing how to handle 
these new brands when we hear them 
on our tape — what company makes it; 
how is it spelled. 

Robert W. Morris, 

executive vice president 

Broadcast Advertisers Reports, Inc. 

An fm set count- needed 
As a lifetime radio man (since 1924) 
I went into fm only to prove, at least 
to myself, that the merits of fm prop- 
erly presented could improve the status 
of radio. 

In as much as most major cities 
have a proven percentage of fm re- 
ceivers — WHY is there not a single 
fm set count? It is the fm part that 
results in radio sales in our area and 
we feel an accurate count should be 
made. Dealers in our area say unless 
a radio has fm they cannot sell it. 
This is a ver\ important part of the 
radio picture and difficult to under- 
stand \\h\ >o important a figure could 
be overlooked. 

Jerrj Cobb, station manager, 

KNEV-FM, Reno 



S-PONSOK 



14 SEPTEMBER 1957 




Some mathematician. Bugs Bunny. In recent months the brash 
little star of Warner Bros. Cartoons increased the late-after- 
noon audience on KROD-TV, El Paso, Texas, six -fold — 
jumping from a last-place 4.8 to a first-place 28.1 (ARB, May). 
Warner Bros'. Popeye the Sailor gets Texas-size ratings in 
El Paso, too, pulling a 26.2 ARB for May— nearly three times 
greater than the combined total of the two other stations. 
The El Paso story alone is conclusive proof of the drawing 
power of a. a. p. Cartoons ... a success story that is being 
duplicated from coast to coast. 



To see how Bugs Bunny. Popeye 
the Sailor and other Warner B 
Cartoons ran multiply audiences 
in your area. write'or phone: 

CI.CI.D; 

H • ' ' orp. 

Si5 V . U [rray Hill 6- H NEW YORK 

75 E. Wnrktr Dr,, DEarborn J-.'" I" H CHICAGO 

1511 Brynr H DALLAS 

911 ■ LOS ANGELES 



SPONSOR • 14 SEPTEMBER 195" 



27 




m San ^Mwcisco 




KOBY is No. I station across the board 
in both Pulse and Hooper! July-Aug. 
Pulse: weekdays 15.3, Sat. 16.7, Sun. 
17.3 — averages 6 a.m. -midnight. June- 
July Hooper, weekdays, 7 a.m. to noon 
22.0, noon-6 p.m. 24.0, all day average. 
Nielsen agrees with a 21,100 rating 6 
a.m. to midnight. KOBY operates full 
time . . 10,000 watts blanket the en- 
tire bay area. Definitely the No. I buy 
because its San Francisco's most lis- 
tened-to station. See your Petry man, 
today! 







KOSI is Denver's top rated station all 
day — all weekend! June-July Hooper: 
18.9 a.m., 24.6 p.m. share. June Pulse 
rates KOSI No. I independent, 6 a.m. 
to 6 p.m. with a 17.0 overall average. 
All surveys prove KOSI's dominance . . . 
5,000 watts-sells full time. Represented 
by Forjoe. 

MID- AMERICA 
BROADCASTING CO. 



in Greenville, Miss., WGVM 



No. 1 in both Hooper & 

Nielsen 
Sec: Devney & Co., Inc. 



28 



•■ 











National 






in work 










SPOT 









in work now or recently completed 



TV BUYS 

American Chicle Co., Long Island Citv. N. V.. is planning a cam- 
paign in scattered markets to push its Dentyne gum. Schedule 
starts 1 October for 13 weeks. Minute film announcements will be 
slotted 5:30 to 11:30 p.m.; frequency will vary from market to 
market. Buyer : Bill Santoni. Agency : Dancer-Fitzgerald-Sample. 
Inc.. New York. 

The Bon Ami Co., New York, is going into some 50 major markets 
to advertise its Jet-Spray Bon Ami, with Scott Towels tied-in. The 
Scott Towel Co. will, in turn, promote the cleaner in its spot tele- 
vision. The 10 week campaign will kick-off in September. Minute 
and 20-second announcements will be scheduled both day and night: 
average frequency: 10 spots per week per market. Buyer: May 
Dowling. Agency: Ruthrauff & Ryan. Inc.. New York. 

RADIO BUYS 

R. J. Reynolds Co., Winston-Salem. N. C. is preparing schedules 
in some 200 markets for its Cavalier cigarettes. Campaign starts in 
September for 12 weeks. Minute e.t.'s will be placed throughout the 
day, Monday to Saturday. Average frequency: eight per week, per 
market. Buyers: Hal Simpson and Jim Scanlon. Agency: Y\ m. 
Esty Co., New York. I Agency declined to comment. I 

National Biscuit Co., New York, is using a short-term campaign 
during September in 25 selected markets to advertise its new Cocoa 
Grahams. Minute and 20-second e.t.'s will be scheduled during day- 
time hours, Monday to Friday. Buyer: Jane Podester. Agency: 
McCann-Erickson, Inc., New York. 

Campbell Soup Co., Camden, N. J., is planning a heavy saturation 
campaign in about 91 markets to advertise new soups. Schedule be- 
gins in September for 23 weeks. Minute, 20 and some eight-second 
e.t.'s will be slotted every day of the week. 7:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m.. 
with heaw scheduling on Wednesday. Thursday and Friday. Fre- 
quency will depend on market. New soups are turkey noodle, mine- 
strone, and chicken vegetable. Buyer: Ed Fluri. Agency: BBDO, 
New York. 

RADIO AND TV BUYS 

J. A. Folger & Co., Kansas City, is entering 130 radio and tele- 
vision markets to promote its instant coffee. Schedule kicks-off 23 
September for a minimum of eight weeks. In television, nighttime 
chainbreaks and I.D.'s will be used: average frequency: 10 an- 
nouncements per week per market. In radio, minute announcements 
will be scheduled during daytime segments. Wednesday. Thursday 
and Friday; frequency will depend upon the market. Buying is not 
completed. Buyer: Jim Ducey. Agency: Cunningham & Walsh, 
New York. I Agency declined to comment.) 



SPONSOR 



14 SEPTEMBER 1957 



VMS FOR WSM-TV 




Star Maker to the Networks . . . s ■»«, . „,, ■> 1957 

27 WSM -and WSM-TV stars have made 76 network TV appearances. You've seen 
them on NBC-TV shows with Diana Shore, Tennessee Ernie, Today, This is Your Life, 
Tonight, Steve Allen. Kraft TV Theater: on CBS-TV shows with Jackie Gleason, 
Gary Moore, Ed Sullivan, Jimmy Dean. Arthur Godfrey, Gunsmoke, Vic Damone; 
on ABC-TV shows with Paul Winchell and the Big Heat. With this kind and quantity 
of talent on tap, it's easy to see why WSM-TV is clearly Nashville's Number 1 
Television Station. Ask Hi Bramham or any Petry man about America's most 
astonishing talent story. 



I 



Channel 4. Nashville. Tenn. • NBC-TV Affiliate • Clearly Nashville s I TV Station 

IRVING WAUGH, General Manager • EDWARD PETRY & CO National Advertising Rcpresentati.es 

>n - Clear Channel 50,C 



WSM-TV 



SPONSOR 



1 \ SEPTEMBER 195*3 



29 






* T H NOW A SHOUT! 

7m cor MOWER 



Yes, it's Ziv's HARBOR COMMAND! What a combination 
...a commanding role... a commanding performer . .. 
fused in white hot action! 



OVER 135 MARKETS ALREADY SOLD! 



HAMM'S BEER NUCOA MARGARINE WNAC-TV - Boston 

LION OIL ONE-ADAY TABLETS WTVN-TV - Columbus. Ohio 

SEALY MATTRESS LA ROSA SPAGHETTI KYW-TV Cleveland 

CAPITOL BEDDING ROCHESTER HOSPITAL SERVICE WTVY-TV Dothan 

COCA-COLA MULLER-PINEHURST DAIRY WANE-TV - Ft. Wayne 

ALKA-SELTZER INDEPENDENT LUMBER CO. WOAM-TV Hattiesburg 

KROGER ROCHESTER MILK PRODUCERS WFGA-TV - Jacksonville 

FORD S. A. MACH. 8, SUPPLY CO. WTVJ-TV - Miami 

CARNATION MILK HOME RADIO & FURNITURE CO. WKXP - Lexington, Ky. 

BLUE CROSS WLW-A - Atlanta WDSU-TV - New Orleans 

WEST END DAIRY KBAK-TV - Bakersfield WOR-TV New York 

SQUIRT WAFB-TV - Baton Rouge WKY-TV - Oklahoma City 

LEE MOTORS KVOS - Bellingham WEEK-TV Peoria 

DERST BAKING KBOI-TV - Boise WLW-I-TV Indianapolis 



KLRJ-TV - Las Vegas 

WCAU-TV - Philadelphia 

KOAM-TV - Pittsburg, Kan. 

KPHO-TV - Phoenix 

WIIC-TV - Pittsburgh, Pa. 

KSL-TV - Salt Lake City 

KRON-TV - San Francisco 

WDAU-TV -Scranton- 

Wilkes Barre 
KOVR-TV Stockton 

KOLD - Tuscon. Ariz. 

KTNT-TV -Tacoma 

WTVT - Tampa 
KTVX-TV Tulsa 

KONA Honolulu 

and others 



' 




II 



Quafiful Ratings! Success! 

HARBOR COMMAND" 



Starring 



WENDELL COREY 





ii^HHHi 





From 6 to 9 a. m. . . . from 9 to noon ... as all day . . . 

It's a WHB world 



A.slv to see the Willi area dominance story- 

paeked with convincing documentation! 

Latest AREA NIELSEN: Willi first with 48.5%, <i a.m.-6 p.m. 

Latest HOOPER: Willi first with V2A' , all-day average 

Latest TRENDEX: Willi first with 42.1$ all-day average 

Whether it's prime . . . or any time . . . talk to Blair or 

Willi (i.M Georse W. Armstrona. 

WHB 10,000 watts mi 7U> /,'(• 
Kansas City, Missouri 



54.1% 



(III II X it 1st II 

(6 a. in. -noun) more 
Hunt nil oilier 
Kansas CHll radio 
stations com hi in <l. 



L 




TODAY'S RADIO FOR TODAY'S SELLING 



WDGY Minneapolis St Paul 
WHB Kansas City 
WQAM Miami 

REPRESENTED BY JOHN BLAIR & CO. 



TODD STORZ, PRESIDENT 



WTIX New Orleans 

REPRESENTED BV ADAM YOUNG INC. 



J 



SPONSOR • 



SEPTEMBER 1957 



SCK2NTKRY 



-* — ■ — ' *■ 



72 

«./ 

H 
00 
M 

c 

o 



IS 
A 

CLIENT 
REVOLT ^C^: 

AGAINST 

TV COSTS 
BREWING? 




UNIONS 



SUPERVISORS 



Tv production costs will get sharper scrutiny from clients as Bplil 
in audience indicates danger of co3t-per-l,000 increase. ireas ihej 
want to pare: talent prices, unnecessary padding of time and cosl 



1 his ma\ be the year when clients 
stand up on their hind legs and protest 
against rising tv costs with concrete 
reasons to hack them up. 

Like the weather. t\ costs have heen 
the perennial subject of conversation 
ever since there was a television medi- 
um. But this year a closer scrutim of 
costs is regarded In man) admen as 
ine\ itahle. 

If there's fat in tv program or com- 
mercial production costs. 1957 is the 
year when the trimming can be ex- 
pected to start. 

The reasons win the budgetary pen- 



cil-, have been sharpened arc multiple: 

• Profits for mam manufacturers 
are slimmer and harder to come bj 
now. Toda) most advertisers tune to 
plan on giving extra incentives t<> deal- 
ers and consumer- to push sales in the 
more competitive market-. Since the 
cost of selling is up in various direc- 
tions, all advertising costs conn- under 
the microscope. 

• I\ audiences will l>e split this fall 
as they've oever Keen before in t\ 
history. The strength of \BC T\ 
coupled with good programing on in- 
dependent stations i films i mean that 



even if production and time costs had 
-(•■•ill -till, cost-per-1,000 would be 
rising. < lients will be looking for 
ways to Ix'hl the cost-per-1,000 line. 

• l\ costs in efiVi I will be in the 
limelighl at this fall- \\ \ meeting 
through the Professor Fre) stud] of 

agenc\ compensation. \n earlier and 
independent -ui\e\ of the \\\ mem- 
bership has ahead] indicated thai the 
t\ package show commission has suf- 
fered some serious inr. .ad- among na- 
tional advertisers. see 31 \u_Mi-t 
1957 sponsor for surve] details.) 



SPONSOR 



14 SEPTEMBER 1957 



33 



Clients want sayings 
behind the scenes, not in 
on-screen values, stress cuts 
in excessive crews, personnel 

\- an increasing number of clients 
begin to talk about t\ costs, the major 
point the) arc trying t<> determine is: 
\\ here precisely are the areas of in- 
flation? These are some of the tenta- 
tive answers. 

1. Main clients feel that no one 
has fought hard enough to keep prices 
down. Show costs, the) say, are not 
necessarily in line with production 
costs. 

"The price is determined b) what the 
freight will hear, rather than 1>\ the 
actual cost of producing," says the ad- 
vertising director of a major package 



therefore impractical for them to share 
die possibilit) of getting a good size 
return. 

"Even when a client does make such 
a contract, it's not necessariU a big 
-a\ ing for him.'' sa) - ^ &R's Rod Erick- 
son. "Rarel) will the producer of a 
top propert) make that kind of deal. 
\iiil even if he does, it may take a 
couple of \ears in syndication and in 
foreign markets, before the program 
shows an) profit." 

2. There's padding of production 
expenses which tends to amount to 
considerable money by the end of the 
year, according to sponsors of live 
shows. "We could be buving a spot 
booster campaign in at least two extra 
markets for a year on the unnecessan 
expenses that come through to us." 
says the advertising director of a large 
appliance manufacturer. 

One of the incidents that he cited 
as typical "padding" was a better than 



A "LITTLE" PADDING ADDS UP BY YEAR'S END 

A typical case of "milking" that clients object to occurred for one sponsor, 
who got a hill for more than S200 after one weekend'- rehearsals for his 
show. This bill was for "coffee and sandwiches t<>r the crew!" Were such 
an item to be repeated on a 52-week basis, it would actually pay for two 
extra commercials at S5.000 each, or for additional stations on the client's 
network lineup, or for a brief spot schedule in a trouble market. Such a 
bill i- typical of the "behind-the-scenes waste" that clients will clamp down 
on -e\^rel\ in the cuning season — this client said "no" and didn't pay. 



foods firm who adds these points: 

"The agency doesn't bargain as hard 
as it might for us for two reasons : 
(1) Its gross commission hinges on 
our expenditure, and that takes awa\ 
part of the incentive to cut the price. 
| 2 * Once the price is agreed upon, the 
packager takes the risk. He knew- 
that keeping the production cost down 
will increase his profit. It wont do 
an\ thing for us, the sponsor, however." 
Some clients have changed this pic- 
ture b) -baring in the producer's 
equity. This is true of Colgate's 'Thin 
Man, Sterling's The Vise, Lorillard's 
Board of Last Resort. 

However, most packagers are un- 
willing to give up any part of their 
etpjity to the client, since they can get 
financing from other sources. It's 



S200 sandwich and coffee bill for the 
production crew on a weekend of re- 
hearsing. "We want good work from 
them." he told sponsor. "But there's 
nothing in the union contract that sa\s 
the\"ve got to get ham and cheese on 
rye at our expense. 

Insignificant though such a bill 
might seem when pitted against the 
multi-million production budget of a 
show, it does create suspicion about 
other hidden costs which have been less 
eas\ to catch. 

"Our agency discovered one item 
that really burned us." said the top 
advertising executive of a cosmetics 
firm. "We were paying overtime for 
the network crew — because thev'd 
worked 40 hours on other shows be- 
fore coming to work on our program."' 



3. Talent agents ate pushing talent 
price- nut < . f line in proportion to the 
popularity of certain show categories. 
This year, musical and variet\ talent 
i- at a premium and sponsors with such 
shows are feeling the pinch. 

"It isn't just the kind of bargain the 
talent agents drive that disturbs u-." 
one cigarette adman told sponsor. "It's 
the fact thai they take a verv short- 
range view of the business 1>\ forcing 
prices up. In some instances, the) 
even add 10' < in commission to the 
over-all net cost of tha sho'.v package. 
When you add this figure to the pack- 
agers profit and to the agency com- 
mission, you find that some 3595 of 
the cost of a show to the advertiser 
goes for things that never appear on 
the screen." 

The one area of production costs 
that have not been driven up in propor- 
tion to talent costs are the prices for 
scripts. In fact, this is the one cost 
factor clients rarely complain about, 
nor is it likely that any major saving 
could be made here. The average price 
paid for a one-hour dramatic script 
even b\ top talent is still only S2.000. 
or about Z% of the total show produc- 
tion cost. 

4. Commercials production as such 
is still getting less of a going-over than 
programing, since commercials — while 
taking 10' \ of programing time — 
generally cost far less. Clients say it 
isn't a question of cutting down on 
tnonev allotted, but rather on making 
increasinglv sure that it is used in the 
most effective and efficient way. 

" Vgenc) commercials producers are 
ver) experienced by now. says R&R's 
tv-radio v. p.. George Wolf. "Yirtually 
e\erv one of them could be a full- 
fledged programing producer on his 
own. Our commercials head is a man 
who'd previouslv worked for a film 
commercials producer. This means 
that it's impossible for any price pad- 
ding to slip by us. We don't feel that 
the cost of commercials has gone up in 
proportion to the cost of programing." 

Problems with excessive commercials 
costs arose more frequently, according 
to a number of clients, when there 
were more live network commercials. 
Extra costs stemmed from the fax re- 
hearsals the networks insisted upon and 
also from a lack of sufficient pre-camera 
planning in the earlier days of tele- 
vision. 

But on the whole, the majority of 
advertiseis agree that commercials will 



34 



SPONSOR • 14 SEPTEMBER 1957 



bv the last area oi t\ production costa 
to (eel an) pinch. "This i- the part 
that sella oui products," the brand 
manage] l"i a detergent told sponsor. 
"To skimp on it means cutting oui own 
throat." 

This doea not mean that clients <l<>n t 
look more and more askance at an) 
waste Footage 01 at imperfections in the 
&na] product. During tin- year to come, 
they're likelj to become increasingl) 
involved in the shaping "I Btoryboards 
and pre-production planning to make 
sure that the final product achieves the 
ii iii-i ia >>l" salesmanship the) want. 

5. Filming programing outside the 
i ounti ) . while not yet a major trend, 
i- likel) to pick u|i popularity in the 
next year. Of course, the possibilities 
.if uuiii^ outside the I .S. are often limi- 
ted f>\ the pool of actors available and 
the requirements of the stun. But more 
clients are investigating Bucb possibili- 
ties and Great Britain and Canada will 
be the countries to gain from tbis trend. 

"If you can shoot in England you 
can save yourself as much as two-thirds 
of the OUt-of-j>ocket cost." sa\s l!<"l 
Erickson. "Just eliiuinatiriiz S\(i resid- 
ual payments spells out a big saving. 
But you can't adapt ever) show to 
conditions outside the I .S." 

6. *' I \ bas gone Hollywood, is one 
of the most frequentl) beard com- 
plaints about production methods and 
costs. "The] aren't liapp\ unless they've 
..■I 75 guys on the set, and no one 
knows what the other one does." 

Most clients admit that nothing pains 
them as much as going into the client 
booth and counting the number of 
people on the set. 

"\\ e pa) $65 for a gu) t" carrj an 
ashtra) across the stage," says Ray- 
mond Spector. "Now I'm certainl) 
not against unions, but they're a part 
of this industry too and the) shouldn't 
milk it so or their source of mone) 
will run drv."" 

The fault for excessive union de- 
mands in terms of si/e of crews, and 
work conditions and wages lies with 
the producers and networks, according 
to advertisers. The) feel that a tougher 
bargain should bave been -truck with 
the unions years ago. 

Maybe the answer will be for u- to 
gel in on the negotiations more direct- 
ly, the ad manager of a drugcompan) 
told sponsor. "So far we've pressured 
onl) in the background through our 
agencies, but since this hasn't worked, 
i Please turn to page 54 > 



CLIENTS OBJECT TO "HIDDEN COSTS" THAT 
DON'T HELP SHOW, NOT ON-SCREEN VALUE 



Crews seem too large 

< In hi- don'l lik'- paj i" 
bavi irrj an aahtraj ■< ros - 

the iel " I bej realize thai onion 
1 1. mi. 1. 1- require certain size 
networks and pro 
limn- could h .i mi -I 

bardei foi leu > ostij requirt a i 
I be industry mual polii e itself. 



Scripts are still cheap 

Although they're the kej ti 
show. BCiipU arc not overpriced, 
according to tin- experts, 
clients object t<> those costs thai 
"actually appear on the screen." 
The script for an average bom 
drama costs only $2,000, but -tail 
writers for comedies an- "Mr-paid. 



Sets are costing more 

Competition for ratings has driven 
set aii'l -renin costs op. .1- each 
-how strives fur top-notch produc- 
tion valor-, "like Hollywood, tv 
has tu In- colossal these days," 
sponsor- Bay. Igain they don'l 
object to paying for top sets, jn-t 
to time waste in producing them. 



Too many supervise 

Supervisory talent at the t> 
most expensive over-the-line 
outside of performing talent. In- 
day -pnn-ir- want '■• 111 iv 
each nf the supervisors 1- palling 
hi- weight, contributing to - 
values. They're damping down on 
duplication oi producers, • i 1 r 




SPONSOR 



I 1 -; PTEMBER 195*3 



35 




"Americans are constantly on the move 
with radio." says ABN President Rohert 
Eastman explaining his cancellation of 
Nielsen Radio Index. "The Audimeter 
can't follow the portable around. Peo- 
ple not only carry the radio . . . 



around outside but in the home. too. Radio is 
now a multi-access medium with 50 million out-of-home 
sets. The audience to these out-of-home sets is not be- 
ing measured properly today. We feel that though 
Pulse doesn't get all the audience, it captures more of 
it than Nielsen does. The Nielsen measurement . . . 



" ... of autos was a step in the right di- 
rection but there's more to radio than just 
counting heads. The trouble with radio re- 
search is that the eye is not on the ball but 
on the referee. The ratings don't mea-ur> 
salesmanship. We're going to sell the . . . 



WHY ABN DROPPED NIELSEN 

Meters don't capture all the audience, undersell radio, ABN 
President Robert Eastman contends. Though ABN will use Pulse, 
the emphasis will be on salesmanship and showmanship to prove that 
sales results for the sponsor are the best research data for radio 



■ mating service? have been bought 
and junked before but the dropping of 
Nielsen by the American Broadcasting 
Network has had some of the impact 
of a large rock in a small pond. 

Item : ABN had been a subscriber 
hi the Nielsen Radio Index for 11 
sears. Furthermore, the cancellation 
came on the eve of the introduction 
of a new. and what was widely-herald- 
ed as an impro"\ ed, NRI. 

hem: Though U3N President Rob- 
ert E. Eastman stated that current au- 
dience research does not do justice to 
radios audience reach, he turned 
around and bouidit a new Pulse net- 



work rating service. This will he a 
multi-market measurement covering an 
estimated 40'* of I .S. radio homes. 

Item: Except for a few years. Niel- 
sen has had a monopoly of the net- 
work radio rating business. In buying 
Pulse. Eastman was instrumental in 
injecting what will undoubtedly be a 
new competitive note into network 
radio promotion battles — a safe as- 
sumption in light of the fact that dif- 
ferent rating services often come up 
with different figures. 

Item: An underlined preference for 
one rating sen ice as against another 
is not an every-da\ occurrence in the 



top echelons of the broadcasting busi- 
ness. Though there has been no offi- 
cial announcement about ABN's pur- 
chase of Pulse, the dropping of Niel- 
sen was significantly accompanied bv 
an ABN press release citing the rea- 
sons for the move. 

Item: NRI s wide acceptance on 
Madison and Michigan Aves. will ad- 
mittedl) not help Eastman's initial 
sales efforts, which are of crucial im- 
portance now with ABN clothed in a 
drastically revised programing gar- 
ment. 

Though some admen have gotten 
the impression that Eastman i* fi<_dit- 



3(> 



SPONSOR 



14 SEPTKMHF.R 1957 




. . . basic values of radio and we're going 
to help our affiliates do that, too. We're going 
to provide them »iili sales and programing 
aids. \ health) network needs health] sta- 
tions. We're going ti> -.-II imaginatively and 
we're going to program for today's audience." 



ing himself, there is an underlying 
-train of consistenc) in Eastman's ap- 
proach, strongl) reminiscent <>f his 
operations as a station representative 
executive with John Blair Co. 

The switch from Nielsen to Pulse, 
which carries the overtones of a cal- 
culated dramatic move, is Eastman's 
wav of saving he has no intention of 
supporting research thai undersells 
radio. It has long been an article of 
faith with him that an important seg- 
menl of the radio audience i- not be- 
ing measured, ami. of course, lie i- not 

alone in tin-. The losl audience he i- 
thinking about, he told SPONSOR, are 

Vmericans on the move, listening to 
portables at I cache- and parks, carry- 
ing small radios around from room to 
room, tuning in a hotel room, listening 

it work, in store- and in restaurants. 
1 he Nielsen V.udimeter, he main- 
tain-, immobilizes the radio -el. thus 
cannot corral Americans on the move. 
While he welcome- Nielson's auto 

measurements and NRI's new cumula- 
tive audience data, he feel- it i- not 
enough. Though Eastman doesn't be- 
lieve that Pulse measures the entire 
radio audience, he feel- it- method cap- 
tures more of it. 

\ more precise kev to Eastman's 



thinking, however, h i- nothin !•■ .1.. 
w iih ic-e.uc h 't i- In- ambition i" re 
■ asl \i:\ - ,i show- 

manship and salesmanship. \\ Kile re- 
■ h will pla) a part in telling \l'.\ 
i" advertisei - I astman h ill deal more 
h.av il\ w 1 1 1 1 ..ili. i tangibles. 

lie will stress -de- results, foi one 
thing. \- prool ..l the > ontention thai 
i ounting head- i- just pari of the radio 
stoi \ . Raj I ichmann, dire< i"i -i salt - 
development and resean h, points oul 
thai, though Breakfast < tub didn'l 
have a- high ratin ;s as othei shows 
on VBN's morning bloi k. it h i- been 
more populai with advertisers. 

I hi- i- one "I the re isons m hj 
1/ his' ering Streets, 1/. / m- 5/ 
and // hrn n (,nl Marries were dropped 
from the \l!\ schedule, a surpris 
move in \ i<w of tloii strong i it 

I I here were othei reasons, too. \- 

VBN told the industi v in a recenl trade 

ad quoting Nielsen, soap operas have 

dropped 37' I in their share of radio 

audiences. The ad also cited an I! \i: 

-urvev earlier this v.-ar which brought 

out that (ill' . of the hou-ew ive- listen 

to music, while 34.892 listen to soap 
operas. \nd finall) . it was pointed out 
in the ad. nighttime tv satisfies the 

demand for drama, i 

The attitude anion- manv agenc) 



if li men thai -., 

Ii I', in ] |H | 

"') 'HI < till II • 

1 

effectiveness .1.. 
daj oul lav .,l the 

up and down M on St. \ ■■• I isn't this 
what the sponsoi i- real I) 

in ' 

"\\ .• know what ll 

radio are. \\ e're experts in out field 
and we know out prodUi i. \\ e won't 
let I .-'mi Vudimetera measure that val- 
ue roi ii- Nielsen doesn't 
salesmanship." 

he added, uble with 

radio rese in h is that - not on 

the hall hiii op the refen 

\- i subsi ribei to the new Pulse 
network -eiv i. .-. whii h m ill i 
about 18 million radio home 
■ ities, I astman h ill not let the results 

lie "ii a -helf. ||e made , I ■ .,, Pulse 

ratings w ill figure in VBN's -■ King 
plans. 

I his i- ii ntradii tion t" his 

statements about the values "f audi- 
ence resean h, he maintain-. 
Pulse interviews people in the ho i 
he said, it gathers in it- net list* n 
ing in the manv -< alt- red pi ii es w 
1 I'lrn m' turn In ; 



Showmanship will !»■ stressed in \I!V- new program ind umple <■( 

hoop-la i- provided below .i- models promote the Herl S 

icy. The program, fir-i ..f the new weekday lineup, nude ii- deb I Laboi 



SPONSOR 



14 SEPTEMBER 1957 




HOW TV LICKED A 



WINTER SALES SLUMP 




National Paint & Varnish of Los Angeles boosted sales 22% with a well- 
researched, merchandised television campaign. Lack of competitive 
Wtxupm 

%52gj2jjS^ activity assured dealer interest, heightened impact, helped distribution 



I any industries have "off-seasons," 
that annual period of low sales when 
the industry pulls in its head and waits 
for fatter months. But here's the story 
of a company that decided to do some- 
thing ahout a seasonal slump. 

National Paint & Varnish Co. of 
Los Angeles discovered last winter that 
their off-season was the result of not 
trying to sell; for with a modest bud- 
get, spent mainly in television (70%) 
and a well planned, merchandisable 
campaign, they were able to take the 
annual dip out of their sales curve. 

The campaign, handled by the Tilds 
& Cantz agency of Los Angeles, con- 
sisted of 100 minute tv spots and 270 
radio announcements. The schedules 
were divided among five tv and three 
radio stations for a seven-week period. 



Research, television and 
direct mail were the three 
basics of this campaign 



On television nothing less than minutes 
were used to take full advantage of 
product demonstration. In radio both 
minute and 30-second spots were used. 

According to Melvin Spellens, com- 
pany president, as a result of the cam- 
paign, winter sales increased by 22 r < . 

"One of our objectives," says Mar- 
vin Cantz, account executive, "was to 
create the illusion of a much larger 
campaign, primarily for the impact 
this would have on our dealers." 

To the trade, the campaign was 
billed as the biggest "off-season" paint 
promotion yet, aimed at relieving the 
winter sales slump. Company sales- 
men, equipped with complete advertis- 
ing details, explained to dealers that 
National's objective was to produce 
maximum sales support at the time 





when it was most needed, during the 
fall and winter months. 

The same message was carried via 
full-page insertions in regional paint 
and hardware journals. To increase 
the impact and scope of this campaign 
to the dealer. Ethel Jacobs, National's 
advertising manager, sent ad reprints, 
letters and giant-size cards to all deal- 
ers in the area. The agency was suc- 
cessful in getting all radio and tv sta- 
tions participating to also send tele- 
grams, cards and letters to local paint 
dealers. All told each dealer received 
12 direct mail pieces in a period of 
three weeks. Trade and consumer pub- 
licity supported this effort. 

A successful campaign depends 
greatly on planning and coordination; 
and the impact of this one was no acci- 



Merchandising supplied dealer impa.j 
Each retailer received 12 separate niailin 
from agency partner. Walter Tilds and clie i 



Media plans emphasized television because Na- 
tional'- product required strong demonstration. 
Media director, Bill Frank confers with Cantz 



Market research was backbone of the 
campaign. Marvin Cantz (1.), Margorie Vdams 
and Russell I hue. discuss consumer habits 




mw ■ 




Vivid demonstration of "I oloi Lok p ' is given when a mischievous irks up painted wall-, ihi 



"* 




• omplete campaign j s presented to National 
aint- advertising manager. Ethel Jacobs and gen- 
ial manager Melvin Spellens (c.) l>\ Marvin ('ant/. 
ampaign «a> completely accepted despite the fact 
lat it represented an enormous departure from am 
revious campaign in National Paint-' long h - 



SPONSOR '• 14- SEPTEMBER 1957 



dent. When nida & • antz t""k ovei 
the National Pain) account lasl sum- 
mer, an extensive market research pro- 
gram was launched under the direc- 
tion of Russell Han-, head of markel 
research at the agency. I Hi- stud) 
provided man) <>f the answers for the 
client and agenc) . 

Here are some <>f the kej findings: 

Research indicated that the nation- 
wide stump in paint sales need not 
appl) tn Southern California, Na- 
tional's distribution area, whei 
moderate climate allows l"i year-round 
outdoor painting. 

Most interior and exterior painting 
i- done between the months of March 
and September. I In- peak months for 
interior painting are Ma\ and S 
tember, most exteriors an- painted in 
Jul) and Vugust. I In- lowest point 
nt painting activit) i- in December 
and Januar) although this declii • 
not as sharp in southern California a- 
elsew here. 

S lection of color, Hare reported, is 



the « oman - realm in interior p 

but i- handled b) both n • 

women in extei i"i i oloi i hoii 

the man who usuall) does tin 

ing. < oloi lines definitel) influi 

the i Imii <• of brands, and a brand with 

sufficient ■ hoii e "t i olors i« ii 

competitive position. 

an important role in brand selection, 

both through ret ommendal 

stock ■ arried. 

Res Jso iti'l" ated thai 

-i\<- < ompetition among paint In 
and a lack "f reall) si mi) prrf- 

ereni - • it difficult to -<-ll a par- 

ticular bi 

i ountered the problems of I 
sumii the 

part «f consumers and tli»- lii^lih 
J nature nf the prodm t. 

\.|\i l ! - _ - _ • ■ OUl "f 

these studies. National was to intro- 
duce a symbol fur immediate brand 
identification, provide a tangible rea- 
~< »n win it- paint was "better" and 
/' ease turn /<> | 



39 



NIGHTTIME RADIO'S 
STAR IS RISING 



N 



■**• 









This week new evidence of radio's strength in prime 

tv time turned up. Reps and stations report gains in 

W 
nighttime business. But smashing down psychological 

barriers still remains night* radio's biggest problem 



! W. 



■.<■ 



cr+ 



Part of a continuing series on nighttime radio 



1 his week, fresh evidence was 
stacked on the growing pile of proof 
that nighttime spot radio is one of 
the greatest areas of opportunity for 
advertisers. 

This week, too, sellers are stressing 
this opportunity a little more and 
buyers are listening a little harder. 
Most station reps report sales in night- 
time hours are well ahead of last 
iiutumn. A number of timehuyers pre- 
dicted such an increase months ago in 
a sponsor survey I see Tv Radio Bas- 
ics, July 1957 I . The outlook is prom- 
ising and nighttime radio's star is 
rising. 

But the psychological barriers re- 
main. Despite overwhelming evidence 
of radio's vast potential after 7 p.m., 
many an advertiser is still afraid of 
the dark. 

The latest evidence is being pub- 
lished this week in New York. It is a 
five-color. 35-page book of facts titled, 
"Two for the money with nighttime 
radio," compiled by the Radio Divi- 
sion of Edward Petry & Co. Here are 
the points it makes — and they are typ- 
ical of the way nighttime radio is be- 
ing sold today: 

1. Nighttime radio audiences are 
large — just a shade under daytime. 

2. These audiences remain with 
radio during all television prime time, 
with no great fluctuation in size. The 
biggest audience is between 8 and 9 
p.m. 

3. Nighttime radio listeners repre- 
sent a family audience — with a bonus 
of more men proportionately than can 
be reached at any other time I see au- 
dience composition chart at right l . 

4. This audience is not composed of 
poor people who don't have television 
sets. It is substantially the same au- 
dience that listens to radio during the 
day. 

5. The listener at night is usuallv 
relaxed and attentive. 

6. Nighttime radio is in a position 
to be dominated to some extent bv a 
big advertiser. 

7. Night — and late night — signals 
have tremendous reach, are rarely 
counted in full on area surveys. 

The Petrv presentation stresses one 
other point. Clients can get "two for 
the money, in line with the fact that 
many stations are repricing nighttime 
radio so that it goes for half the cost 
of day. It lists 29 major markets I not 
all are the site of a Petry-represented 
station I which can be bought for half 
price after 7 p.m. This is not a com- 



SPONSOR 



14 SEPTEMBER 1957 



plete li»t of all such stations, foi the 
picture ia changing rapidly. 

M>(! IJadii) Spot Sales a^ well is 
bringing <>wt a new rate card for it- 
stations. For participations there will 
be a single rate including days, nights 
ami weekends. I>m there will be a sec- 
ond rate tor programs after !! p.m. on 
Mondays through Fridays. This rale 
will be slight!) lowei than the daytime 
rate on programs. 

While a number of stations are 
meeting the nighttime sales problem 
through reduced rale-, others are go- 
ing mil after the same business with 
a reverse tactic. The Bartell stations, 
for example, have ver) recenth raised 
their nighttime radio rates 15%. 

1 |> or down, rates w ill not be the 
sole factor in stimulating nighttime 
radio sales. Bui the fad that the) are 
being juggled about is indicative of the 

new aura oi interest surrounding the 

medium. 

The roadblocks still in the wa) of a 
reall) big national nighttime crash- 
through are still big. But, according 
to a number of industr) leaders, the) 
boil down to this: "It just ain't fash- 
ionable 

1 et here are a few weathercocks that 
point to an increase in nighl buying 
that ma) answer the "It ain't fashion- 
able" feeling with "Maybe not l>ut 
it's profitable. 

• Most cigarettes now go in for 

heav) use of nighttime radio. 

• Beers generall) use nighttime 
and beers have been in heav) this 
summer. 

• Texaco schedules about two-thirds 
of its radio advertising at night. 

• I he lea Council buys heavil) 
after 7 p.m. 

Local advertisers, the shrewd in- 
siders in ever) market, are using night- 
time radio and have been for a long 
while, hut nationals are gradual]) join- 
ing them. Vmong these nationals who 
recenth have been scoring success 
after 7 p.m. are \merican Tobacco for 
Lucky Strike and Hit Parade. Time 
Magazine. Liggett \ Myers for Oasis. 
Texas Co.. Hellman's. Shell Oil. and 
Novo Greeting Cards. 

Westinghouse Broadcasting esti- 
mates their dollar volume in nighttime 
sales for July of this year was 150$ 
ahead of sales for July 1956. Much 
of this increase Westinghouse attrib- 
utes to its new "Lateral programing" 
that features a "behind-the-scenes"" 
theme in a nightly show called Pro- 
gram PM. One of its stations 



I \\ <>\\ 1 1. Fort \\ ayne) has Bttrai ted 
in local sponsoi - m ith this f"i mat. 

Pra< t i< all) evei j station rep thai 
SPONSOR talked to also reported good 
u: . i i r i - in nighttime radio thig summer 
with ever) sign oi the increase contin- 
uing to build now thai fall has < ome. 
Besides this, renewals are steady, of 
course, it musl be remembered that 
da) time has i ontinued to btov< in vol- 



eratel) rathei than through da I 
crowding. 'No radio m hedule is • 
plete without nighttime i intends: 
Perrj Bascom, managei of national 
radio sales foi \\ B< 

unong a numbei of reps and 
tionmen there is a growing tendi 
to 1 1 \ to sell nighttime i- pari of the 
broadi asl day. Ps) i hologii all) this 
approach ma) have much in its favor. 



NIGHT RADIO HAS A GOOD FAMILY AUDIENCE 

Men Women Teens Children 



Morning 



17% 



63% 



L* r 



1 4 ,J 



Afternoon 



17 



10 



14 



Evening 



45 



18 



10 



What is .i nighttime radio audience? It is .i fimil) audience with i bonus audience of men. as 
i- indicated by the al>"\<- chart From an Edward Petrj 8 ' o. presentation si published thi* 
week. Titled "Two fur the mone) «ii)i nighttim; radio," the stud) runs 

vasl potential "f radio advertising after 7 p.m. This particular - led on an A. < 

Nielsen Nov.-Dec. 1956 study. S kI for full r treatment oi main point- of Petrj presentation 



ume too, and it must influence the 
growing success oi nighttime sale-. 

For daytime and traffic hours, in 
main cases, cannol contain all the an- 
nouncement- of a heav) saturation 
schedule and -ome musl -['ill over into 
nighttime. Package plans also help in- 
troduce clients to the advantages of 
nighttime. Whatever leads clients to 
these new pastures is all to the ::ood. 

but nighttime will onl) come into full 
(lower when clients mo\e into it delib- 



It lays no undue -tie-- on nighttime 
that might impl) it musl be . ham- 
pioned or defended Not does the sta- 
tion have to compete with itself in sell- 
ing its time. \- wa- pointed out to 
SPONSOR b) a rep -ale-man who for- 
merl) specialized in selling all-nighl 
shows in a major market, there are 
some station people who hesitate to do 
anything that might di-turb their da\- 
time success. But a? da\s fill up the) 
will In* forced to push nighttime. 



SPONSOR 



14 SEPTEMBER 1957 



41 



Cost-per-1 ,000 between the nighttime hours of 
6 and 9 p.m. is 7c less than between the so-called 
"prime time" hours of 6:30 and 9 in the miming 



However, it is this same salesman - 
belief that the most succesful wa\ to 
sell nighttime is to do it program b) 
program. First, build a strong pro- 
gram with a strong personalis . Then 
go out and sell it. 

As for success stories, these are 
trickliiii* through in increasing num- 
bers. Probably the most dramatic of 
these were the series of test announce- 
ments scheduled by Radio Advertising 
Bureau under the most illogical of con- 
ditions — and all in nighttime hours. 

For example, in San Diego where 
nobody buys coal (average tempera- 
ture 59° I.' RAB ran the Blue Coal 
radio jingle smack in the middle of 
KFMB's evening schedule. Four days 
after the last of 52 announcements 
were aired. Pulse checked San Diego- 
ans at random, found that 11 % re- 
called the ads and that many could 
sing back the jingle. 

Laura Scudder potato chips, a South- 
ern California product, which had 
never been East before, was advertised 
by RAB in Baltimore on WITH and 



ililllllll! 



\\ FBR on shows al 7: 15 p.m. and 9 :15 
p.m. \ Pulse check found 11.995 of 
those Man landers questioned remem- 
bered Laura Scudder potato chips and 
of these. 78' ! retained one or more 
main cop) points in the jingle. 

In still another test of nighttime 
radio's impact. RAB sponsored a 15- 
minute show at 10 p.m. on WMBR in 
Jacksonville for Gold Shield coffee, a 
beverage brand exclusive to the Pacific 
Northwest. Two days after the "spon- 
sorship" was dropped. Pulse interview- 
ers at eight Jacksonville intersections 
found that of passersby interviewed 
15.39? remembered the commercial 
for this coffee. 

Similar results have turned up after 
other schedulings in the continuing 
tests conducted by RAB. Currie's ice 
cream, a California product, achieved 
high recall when advertised on WCCO, 
Minneapolis, in the heart of night 
prime tv time in this market with 90* i 
tv saturation. 

The ultimate success of nighttime 
radio, of course, rests with the buyer. 



NIGHTTIME'S BIG ROADBLOCKS 

THE TV FALLACY: Since the arrival of television, clients have been 
telling themselves that nobody listens to radio at night. White tv 
may dominate night entertainment, the margin of difference is much 
smaller than is supposed. 63.4% of all families listen at home at night. 

"IT JUST AIN'T FASHIONABLE!" Maybe not -but it's profitable 
because a big audience exists in nighttime radio. What's more they 
stay with it in prime tv time, reaching a maximum between 8 anil 9. 
Nor are they people who can't afford tv, new Petty stud) shows. 

LACK OF SUCCESS STORIES: // is true that more success stories 
from national advertisers would help sell nighttime radio, but this 
does not mean success stories are non-existent. Texaco. American 
Airlines and other nationals are using night radio with sin i ess. 

WEAK SELLING: In some cases, sellers who hare highly successful 
daytime schedules hesitate to property push tor nighttime business. 
feeling they may be competing with their daytime business. Hut a 
lot of other sellers are really out pushing nighttime along with da). 

PROGRAMS HAVE NO IMPACT: This statement may be true in 
the case of some stations, but more and more the successful opera- 
tions are becoming aware of after-dark shows and are rebuilding 
them. WBC reports big gain through new format. Program Pm. 



Here are gome random facts collected 
b) SPONSOR from man) reps and many 
sources that ma\ help buyers make up 
their minds that this season ma\ be a 
good time to join the torchlight pa- 
rade : 

• Nighttime radio has a big auto 
bonus. Nielsen NRI-NS1 summary re- 
port for earl) winter ] ( J.5(> showed 1.1 
million auto radio sets-in-use at 8 p.m. 
with an average ol about two listeners 
to a car. \s one adman pointed out. 
this is a good bonus since today's cars 
which do almost everything but steer 
themselves have rendered driving a 
sort of hypnotic thing so that motor- 
ists can he more attentive to the car 
radio. 

• Earl) tlnV year, K\B reported 
that 63.495 of all families listen to ra- 
dio at home at niiilit. This is almost 
as mam families as are covered b) 
metro daih newspapers i about 6795 I. 

• \ielsen sets-in-use figures show 
that almost an\ night at 8 p.m. more 
than four million homes are tuned to 
radio I autos not included • . 

• A recent Peters, Griffin. W ood- 
v. aid presentation showed the cost-per- 
1,000 between 6:30 and 9 a.m. is !!'i, 
against 73c between 6 and 10 p.m. It 
showed further that in traffic periods 
786,611 radio families are reached in 
and out of homes while at night 650,- 
511 are delivered. This stud) was 
based on 23 stations representing 31'/ 
of total U.S. radio homes. 

• A Pulse stud\ showed 1<> to 159? 
more listeners per radio set at night 
than in ■"prime" 7 to 9 a.m.. and 30' i 
more than in afternoons. 

• A March-April 10.57 Pulse stud) 
in five markets I Boston. Cleveland, 
Fort Wayne, Pittsburg. Portland, Ore. i 
revealed that the weekly accumulation 
of radio sets-in-use between 8 and 
10:30 p.m. averaged 50 to 70' < . 

• Don't overlook those signal cov- 
erages at night. WLAC, a 50,000- 
watter in Nashville, ran a month mail 
count on response to all its program- 
ing between 8 p.m. and midnight. Mail 
count— 133,920 piece- from 20 states 
i well beyond its NCS #2 coverage of 
394 counties in 15 states I. 

For more articles on nighttime radio 
see the following in sponsor: "Don't 
be prime-time blind." 10 March 1957; 
"These clients aren't "prime-time 
blind'." 20 April 1957: "Who will 
make the big nighttime radio break- 
through?" 1 June 10.57: ""Are lower 
rates needed to sell nighttime spot ra- 
dio?" 13 JuK 1057. ^ 



42 



SPONSOR 



14 SEPTEMBER 19.57 



/■ 



RADIO BASICS/SEPTEMBER 



RADIO SET SALES ARE UP 13 



RETMA figures show l>oth home and auto ><•! trends are running 
well ahead of 1 *).">(>. On the radio network front, the currenl 
amoiiiit of weekly time sold i> 1 \.\ ( r ahead of lour weeks ago 



| he radio >et picture in L957 is a 
bright one. 

Ill l\l \ figures en retail sales <>\ 
home sets and factor) production of 
auto sets Bhou the I . S. is consuming 
radios al a rate 1 3. 1 ' . faster than 
la-i year. 

[hese figures cover sales and pro- 
duction through the first seven months 

of !><>lh 1 ( '.">(. and 1957. The auto 

radio production figures arc the clos- 
est data to actual auto radio sales since 
most auto radio sets are not sold at 
retail stores luit produced on order for 



manufacturers oi automobiles. 

rota] figures For 1957 tlm~ far Bhow 
i,327,408 sets Bold oi produced com- 
pared with (>. 179,771 through Julj of 

L956. \ulo radio production i- espe- 
ciallv health), a reflection of the livel) 
midsummer auto market. 

sponsor's monthlj compilation of 
facts and figures in the Radio Basics 

section also showed a health) trend in 

network business. Sales in terms of 
program time for the current week 
(beginning II September) came to 
115.7 hours for all four networks. 



I In- < ompares h itfa 103.9 houi - for 
tin- week beginning IT August Foui 
week- previously, t r t * - network total 
had been 107.9 hours. See page 16. 1 

Meanwhile, the Station Repn 
tives Vssn. released a product category 
breakdown of spol spending during 
the second quarter. 

The figures Bhowed an in< rease in 
spending \>\ food and grocer) adver- 
tisers, hut a decline in expenditures bj 
automotive, drug and tol acco spon- 
sors. (For the complete breakdown, 
Bee next page. I ^ 



1. RADIO'S DIMENSIONS TODAY 



Radio homes index 



Radio station index 



1957 



1956 



48.2 
radio 
homes 




47.3 
radio 
homes 



50.0 49.1 

U.S. homes U.S. homes 

Source \ C Nielsen. 1 July etch year. 
homes figure* In millions. 









End 


of Jill) 


L957 










Stations 




CPs not 


Applications 




Applications 






on air 




on air 


on hand 




in hearing 


Am 




1 .509.-, 


1 


155 


| 340 




113 


Fm 




1 531 


1 
End 


31 
of Jul) 


1 25 
1 <>.->«» 




5 


Am 




1 2922 


1 


119 


| 263 


1 


124 


Fm 




1 530 


1 


19 


: 


1 





S.-UI-. V 


i a 


montnlj nporl 


s. cpmrnrr- ill 


inr 





Radio set index 



Set 
location 



Home 
Auto 
Public 
places 

Total 



1957 



1956 



90,000,000 82.000.000 

15,000,000 32.000.000 

10.000,000* 10.000.000 

1 ;->.000.000 124.000.000 



Source: UAH 1 January 1956, 1 July 19">:. 
sets in wcrklng order "Xo new Information. 



Type 



Home 

Auto 



Total 



Radio set sales index 



|uly 1957 July 1956 

597,484 576 

256,279 198*565 



853,763 



775,018 



Seven Months Seven Months 
1957 1956 



4,236,453 1,967,555 
3,090,955 .'.-.lJ.-'lr, 

7,327,408 6,479,771 



Source: KF.TMA II me figure! are retail sales, aum figures are factor; production. 



n 



2. SPOT BASICS 

pilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllM lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllilllllllllllllllllllllllllUlllllllllllllllllllllllllM 

Spot radio spending in 1957 by industry category 



Product Category 


1st Quarter 


1957 


2nd Quarter 1957 


6 Months 1957 


DOLLARS 


% of TOT. 


DOLLARS 


°o of TOT 


DOLLARS 


% of TOT. 


Agriculture 


$ 1,29 1,000 


2.7 


$ 1,230,000 


2.6 


$ 2,521,000 


2.7 


Ale. beer and wine 


2,902,000 


5.9 


3,614,000 


7.8 


6,516,000 


6.8 


Amusements, entertainment 


240,000 


.5 


255,000 


.5 


495,000 


.5 


Automotive 


4,020.000 
64,000 


8.2 


3,621,000 


7.8 


7,641,000 


8.0 


Building materials, fixtures, paints 


.1 


661,000 


1.4 


725,000 


.8 


Clothing and accessories 


259,000 


.5 


397,000 


.9 


656,000 


.7 


Confections and soft drinks 


699,000 


1.4 


1,138,000 


2.4 


1.837,000 


1.9 


Consumer services 


2,019,000 


4.1 


1,717,000 


3.7 


3.736,000 


3.9 


Cosmetics and toiletries 


2,158,000 


4.4 


2,408,000 


5.2 


4,566,000 


4.8 


Dairy and margarine products 


202,000 


.4 


219,000 


.5 


421,000 


.5 


Dental products, tooth paste, etc. 


2,487.000 


5.1 


1,154,000 


2.5 


3.641,000 


3.8 


Drug products 


5,375,000 


11.0 


3,513,000 


7.5 


8.888.000 


9.3 


Finance and Insurance 


142,000 


.3 


607,000 


1.3 


749.000 


.8 


Food and grocery products 


8.291,000 


17.0 


9,170,000 


19.7 


17,461,000 


18.3 


Garden supplies and equipment 


108,000 


.2 


203,000 


.4 


311,000 


.3 


Gasoline and lubricants 


2,149,000 


4.4 


3,103,000 


6.7 


5,252,000 


5.5 


Hotels, resorts, restaurants 


140,000 


.3 


126,000 


.3 


266,000 


.3 


Household cleaners, soaps, polishes, waxes 


998,000 


2.1 


1,598,000 


3.4 


2,596,000 


2.7 


Household appliances 


113,000 


.2 


196,000 


.4 


309.000 


.3 


Household furnishings 


120,000 


.3 


95,000 


.2 


215,000 


.2 


Household laundry products 


644,000 


1.3 


554,000 


1.2 


1,198.000 


1.3 


Household paper products 


146,000 


.3 


250,000 


.5 


396,000 


.4 


Household general 


413,000 


.9 


506,000 


1.1 


919.000 


1.0 


Notions 


1,319,000 


2.7 


55,000 


.1 


1,374.000 


1.5 


Pet products 


138,000 


.3 


208,000 


.4 


346,000 


.4 


Publications 


408,000 


.8 


385,000 


.8 


793,000 


.8 


Religious 


1,420,000 


2.9 


1,173,000 


2.5 


2,593.000 


2.7 


Tobacco products and supplies 


8.141,000 


16.7 


6,130,000 


13.2 


14,271.000 


14.9 


Transportation and travel 


1,098.000 


2.3 


1,108,000 


2.4 


2.206.000 


2.3 


Watches, jewelry, cameras 


59,000 


.1 


40,000 


.1 


99,000 


.1 


Miscellaneous 


1.264.000 


2.6 


1,140,000 


2.5 


2.404.000 


2.5 


TOTAL 


$48,827,000 


100.0 


$46,574,000 


100.0 


S05.401.000 


100.0 



Sll \ 



lll!!lllll!lllllllllll!lllllllllllll!!llllll!!lll!llll[||llllllllllllillllllllll!lll 



Mill,!; 



11 



SPONSOR • 14 SEPTEMBER 1957 



How much does out-of-home listening add to in-home? 



iiiiimiiiimitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiui 



Peroral out-of-home listening add- to In-home listening In 28 market- 



Atlanta 


18.1 


Baltimore 


16.3 


Birmingham 


18.0 


Boston 


18.5 


Buffalo 


16.4 


Chicago 


18.3 


Cincinnati 


16.3 


» ■ 1 1 n in l>n - 


17.1 


Dallas 


17.5 


Detroit 


16.5 


Fort Worth 


18.5 


Houston 


18.1 


Kansas City 


16.7 


Los Angeles 


18.7 


Miami 


20.3 


Milwaukee 


18.2 


Minneapolis-St. Paul 


18.3 


New Orleans 


18.3 


New York 


19.1 


Philadelphia 


16.5 


I'll 1 -Inn nil 


17.5 


Portland 


21.0 


Richmond 


16.6 


St. Louis 


17.1 


San Diego 


18.5 


San Francisco 


19.3 


Seattle 


18.0 


Washington, D. C. 


18.3 



IN-HOME mi r-OF-HOME Till- ', I'l l - 




Figures above are from Pulse's semi-annual 
study of out-of-home listening. In-home and 
out-of-home columns show percent of homes 
listening by average quarter hours seven days 
a week. Percentage plus is not measure of 



home- using radio hut ratio between in-home 

and out-of-home. Period covered by data is 
various winter months this year. Averages for 
the group of markets shown: in-home. 18.2 r r : 
out-of-home. 1." average pin-. 2 1.7','. 



Kroni: SPONSOR*! T* Kali. I 



—Ml 



SPONSOR • 14 SEPTEMBER 1957 



45 



3. NETWORK TIME PURCHASES RISE 11.4 



NETWORK BUSINESS INDICATOR 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiin 



Program Hours Sold 



Week beginning 
14 Scpf. 



Hours 



17 Aug. 

Illlllllllllllllllllllll 




Network radio sales, in terms of program time, are up 
11.4% for the current week compared with four weeks 
ago, according to sponsor. Sales figures in the business 
indicator at left are taken from the complete current list 
of network radio clients below as well as the previous 
list run in the last issue of Radio Basics. For purposes 
of comparability, 6-second and 8-second commercials 
are considered as 30 seconds of program time while 20- 
second and 30-second commercials are considered two 
minutes of program time. In the list below, covering 
week beginning 14 September, minute commercials sold 
as such are figured as five minutes of program time. 



ABC 



Admiral: appliances; Breakfast Club; M-F; 25 min. 
AFL-CIO: institutional; Ed. P. Morgan; M-F; 75 min.; /. W. V un- 
der cook; M-F; 25 min. 

American Bird Food Mfg. Co.: Breakfast Club; M; 5 min. 
Assemblies of God: religious; Revivaltime; Su; 30 min. 
Bankers Life & Casualty: White Cross Hospital Plan; Paul Harvey; 
Su; 15 min. 

Beatrice Foods: LaChoy; Breakfast Club; Th; 5 min. 
Bristol-Myers: BuSerin; Breakfast Club; M,W,F; 15 min.; Sal 
Hepatica; Breakfast Club; M,W,F; 15 min. 

Campana Sales: Ayds, Italian Balm; Breakfast Club; M; 5 min. 
Chrysler Corp.: automobiles.; Weekday News; 50 min. 
Food Specialties: Appian Way pizza pie mix; Breakfast Club; Tu; 
5 min. 

Foster-Milburn: Doan's pills: Herb Oscar Anderson: F: 5 min. 
General Foods: Calumet; Breakfast Club; M; 5 min.; Post Cereals; 
Breakfast Club: M-F; 25 min. 

General Motors Corp.: CMC trucks; Howard Cosell, Speaking of 
Sports; Tu-F; 20 min. 

Gospel Broadcasting Assn.: religious; Old Fashioned Revival Hour; 
Su; 60 min. 

Billy Graham: religious; Hour of Decision; Su; 30 min. 
Highland Church of Christ: religious; Herald of Truth: Su; 30 min. 
Midas Muffler: auto mufflers; Weekday Newscasts; M-F; 25 min. 
Miller Brewing Co.: Miller High Life Beer; Newscasts & Sports- 
casts; M-S; 85 min. 

Milner Products: Perma Starch, Pine-Sol; Breakfast Club; W; 5 min. 
Charles Musselman: applesauce: Breakfast Club: W-F: 15 min. 
National Brands, div. of Sterling Drug: Dr. Caldwell's; Sunshine 
Boys; M-F; 25 min. 

Nestle Co.: Nescafe; Breakfast Club; Tu.W.F: 15 min.: Herb Oscar 
Anderson: W.Th.F; 15 min. 

Norwich-Pharmacal: Pepto-Bismol; Weekend Newscasts; Sa.Su; 90 
min. 

Oral Roberts Evangelistic Assn.: religious; Oral Roberts' Broad- 
casts; Su; 30 min. 

Charles Pfizer: animal feed & poultry remedies: Breakfast Club; 
Tu : 5 min. 

Radio Bible Class: religious; Radio Bible Class; Su; 60 min. 
R. J. Reynolds: Winston; Weekday Newscasts: M-F: 100 min.: 
Weekend \ru\scasts: Sa.Su: 90 min. 

Sanduro Company: floor covering; Breakfast Club: Th; 5 min. 
Voice of Prophecy: institutional: Voice of Prophecy; Su: 30 min. 
Dr. Thomas Wyatt: institutional : Wings of Healing; Su; 30 min. 



American Home Foods: Arthur Godirc\ : Th; 15 min.: Weiuh War- 
ren: Th.F: 10 min. 

Angostura-Wupperman: -Irthiir Godfrey, F: 10 min. 
Best Foods: Romance oi Helen Trent: W.F: 15 min.: Our Gal Sun- 
day. Tu; 7 ' - nin.; Nora Drake: Th: 7% min.: Young Dr. Walone; 
M: 7% min.: Galen Drake, Sa; 5 min.; Amos V Andy; F.Sa; 10 
min.: Gunsmoke; ^a.Sn: 10 min.: Johnny Dollar: Su: 5 min. 
Bristol Myers: Arthur Godfrey; M.W; 60 min. 
Campana Sales: Robert Q. Lewis; Sa: 5 min. 
Chesebrough-Pond's: >/-nr/s Time; M.W.F: 5 min. 
board; Sa; 15 min. 



Football Score- 



NOTE: Data on time purchased refers to weekly brand or advertiser total for each 
program. Time bought for particular brands is shown where possible. In cases 
where groups of brands precede a show or group of shows, it was not possible to 
nlnnoint which brands were advertised on each show or on which days of the week 
the brands were advertised Except for General Motors, Chrysler and P Ixirlllard. brand 



Chrysler: Dodge; Gunsmoke; Sa,Su; 10 min.; Mitch Miller; Su; 5 
min.; Sports Resume; Su: 5 nun. .Amos 'n' Andy: F: 5 min.; Chrys- 
ler: Robert Q. Lewis: Tu,Sa; 10 min.; Johnny Dollar; Su; 5 min.; 
Suspense; Su; 5 min. 

Chun King Sales: Arthur Godfrey; W & F, alt. wks.; 15 min. 
Clairol: Galen Drake; Sa; 5 min. 

Colgate-Palmolive: Our Gal Sunday; M-F; 37% min.; Backstage 
Wife; M-F; 37y 2 min.; Strike It Rich; M-F; 37% min.; 2nd Mrs. 
Burton; M-F; 37% min. 

Cowles Magazine: Robert Q. Lewis; Sa; 5 min. 
Curtis Circulation: Arthur Godfrey; Tu; 15 min. 
Ford Motor: Ford div.: Ford Road Show: M-F: 25 min.; Sa: 10 
min.; Su; 20 min.; World News Round Up; M-F; 25 min.; Ford 
Road Show — Arthur Godfrey: M-F; 125 min.; Edward R. Murrow; 
M-F; 75 min. 

General Electric: Hotpoint div.: Robert Q. Lewis; Sa; 5 min. 
General Foods: Arthur Godfrey; Tu.Th, every 4th F; 33% min.; 
Wendy Warren; Th; 5 min.; World News Roundup; Su; 5 min.; 
Gunsmoke; Su; 5 min.; Our Miss Brooks; Su; 5 min.; Amos 'n 
Andy Music Hall; M-F; 25 min.; Galen Drake; Sa; 5 min.; Robert 
Q. Lewis; Sa; 5 min.; Gunsmoke; Sa; 5 min. 

General Mills: Garden Gate; Sa; 5 min.; Galen Drake: Sa: 5 min.: 
Robert Q. Lewis; Sa: 5 min.; Amos V Andy; Sa; 5 min.: Gun- 
smoke; Sa; 5 min.; City Hospital: Sa: 5 min.: Man Around The 
House: Sa; 5 min.; Saturday Night Country Style: Sa: 5 min.: 
Sports Resume; Sa,Su; 10 min.; World Tonight: Sa.Su: 10 min.: 
World News Round Up; Su: 5 min.: Washington Week; Su; 5 min.: 
Suspense; Su; 5 min.; Indictment; Su; 5 min.: Johnny Dollar: Su: 
5 min.; FBI In Peace & War; Su: 5 min.; Sez Who: Su: 5 min.: 
Mitch Miller; Su; 5 min. 

General Motors: Chevrolet; Allan Jackson — News; Sa; 20 min.; 
Robert Trout — News; Su,M-F; 50 min.: Soap Box Derby; Su; 15 
min.; Delco; Lowell Thomas; M-F; 75 min.: GMC trucks; Farm 
News; Sa; 5 min.; Saturday Nile Country Style; Sa; 5 min.: FBI 
in Peace & War; Su; 5 min. 

Hartz Mountain Products: Arthur Godfrey; Th & F, alt. wks.; 15 
min. 

Hudson Vitamin Products: Galen Drake: Sa: 5 min. 
Kitchens of Sara Lee: Arthur Godfrey: F: 15 min. 
Lever Bros.: Ma Perkins: M-F: 37% min.: Romance of Helen Trent: 
M-F: 37% min.: Ma Perkins: M-F alt. wks.: 18 s 4 min.: Fourier Dr. 
M alone: M-F: 37% min.: House Party; M-F: 37% min.: Lipton 
div.: Ma Perkins: M-F: 37% min. 
Lewis Howe: Robert Q. Lewis; Sa; 5 min. 
Longines-Wittnauer: Longines Symphonette: Su: 30 min. 
P. Lorillard: Kent; World Tonight; F.Sa.Su: 15 min.: Indictment: 
Su; 5 min.; Mitch Miller; Su; 5 min.: Sports Resume: Sa.Su: 10 
min.; Saturday Night Country; Sa: 5 min.: Amos V Andy: F.Sa: 
10 min.; Johnny Dollar; Su; 5 min.: Robert Q. Lewis: F: 5 min.: 
Suspense: Su; 5 min.; FBI in Peace & JFar; Su : 5 min.: World 
News Roundup; Su; 5 min.: Washington Week; Su; 5 min. 
Miles Labs: Wendy Warren: M-F; 25 min.: Bill Downs — V 
M-F; 25 min. 

Milner Products: Robert Q. Lewis; Sa; 5 min. 
Philip Morris: Country Music Show; F; 25 min. 
Mutual Benefit Health & Accident Assn.: Arthur Godfrey; Tu & 
every 4th F; 18% min. 

North American Philips: Herman Hickman-Sports; M,W,F; 15 min. 
Pharmacraft: House Party; M.Th.F: 30 min. 
Pillsbury: Arthur Godfrey: Tu.Th; 30 min. 

Information wu not available mm CBS. List shows complete client roster up to presstime. 
in NBC list. rot. means commercials are rotated on different days of the week under 
•he neb's run of schedule plan All data is in terms Of program time, except for MTtS 
and NBC where commercials shorter than a minute are listed separately. On XBC 
radio, minute commercials are arbitrarily credited as five minutes of program time. 



46 



Reader's Digest: irthui Godfrey M; IS mum. 

R. J. Reynolds: Herman Hickman Sports i lu.'lh.^i, i , mum. 

Reynolds Metals: Little Brown fug I ■ mum 

Scott Paper: trthui Godfrey; Th.F 8 ever] ith I 

itage Wife; I . 7 ' _• mum,; Young Dr. Malone; Ih.f. IS nun . 

Drake; Tu.Th; IS min.; Ma Perkins; In 8 W .tit. «k-; v.- nun.; 

2nd Mrs. Burton . I 1 1 . 1- , I". hum 

Seeman Bros.: Irthin Godfrey Tim* \\ I . mum. 
Sherwin-Williams: \rthui Godfrey; W, ever) lid I . I:'. , mill. 
Simonii: Arthur Godfrey : W : 15 nun; How,- Party . W . I . nir 

Herman Yews; Tbjj LO mum.; A. Sevareid V< 

Sa; 1.". min.; SporU Newt; Sa; 10 min. 
Slccp-Ezc: Huns, Party; F; T'- min. 
A. E. Stalcy Mfg.: House Party; Tu; 1") min.; Arthui I F; 

[5 mill. 

Standard Brands: House Party; M: 15 min.: Arthur (■ M ,\ 

evei s lili I' \ 37' •_■ min. 

Sterling Drug: Gunsrnohe; Suj "> min. 

Swift: House Party; F; IS min. 

Wcco Products: Arthur Godfrey; M: 15 min. 

F. W. Woolworth: Woo/worth Hour; Su; 60 min. 

Wm. Wrigley, Jr.: Howard Miller Show; Ml'; 77> nun.; Pal fluttram 

Show; MI"; 7."> min. 



M 



Beltonc Hearing Aid Co.: hearing aid; Gabriel Heattei Sews 

lli: ."> MUM. 

Carter Products: Little Liver Pill-; Cub rid Heatter News; M.Tu. 
Tli : 1.") min. 

Christian Reformed Church: religious; Back To God; Su; 30 min. 
Coca-Cola: Coca-Cola; Eddie Fisher; Tu.Th; 30 min. 
Consumer Drug Corp.: Oragen; Gabriel Heattei Sews; M.W 
min.: Ml': III 20-sec.; John S<ott Sews; Su: 5 min. 
Dawn Bible Institute: religious; Frank and Ernest; Su; 15 min. 
Equitable Life Assurance: insurance; station breaks; loo 8-s< 
Ex-Lax, Inc.: Ex-Lax; rrue Detective Mysteries; M: 5 nun.: Treas- 
ury igent; Tu; •"> min.; Gang Busters; W: 5 min.; Secret} 
land Yard; Th; ."> min.: Counter-Spy; F; 5 min.; Gabriel Heattei 

\ eu S, In. I'll. K: IS nun. 
First Church of Christ, Scientist: religious; How Christian Science 
Heals; Su; 15 min. 

General Motors Corp.: (.Mi trucks; Charles Warren \ > u s . M I ; 
lV> min.: Gabriel Heatter Vews; M.W.I': l"» min. 
Billy Graham Evangelical Assn.: religious; Billy Graham; Su; 30 
min. 

Hudson Vitamin Corp.: vitamins; Gabriel Heatter; Su; 5 min. 
Kraft Foods Co.: All Purpose oil, mustard, Kraft dinner, Miracle 
Whip, Italian dressing, cheese spreads. Parkay margarine; Les Higbie 
is; M-Sa: 30 min.; Holland Engle—News; M-Sa; 30 min.: 
John B. Kennedy Sews; M-Sa; 30 min.; Cedric Foster — News; M- 
Sa: 30 min.; Frank Singiser — News; M-Sa; 30 min.; Charles B. War- 
ren — News; Sa; 5 min.: True Detective Mysteries; M; 5 min.; 
Treasury Agent; Tu ; 5 min.; Gang Busters; W; 5 min.; Secrets of 
Scotland Yard; Th: 5 min.; Counter-Spy; F; 5 min. 
Lutheran Laymen's League: religious; Lutheran Hour; Su; 30 min. 
Manion Forum of Public Opinion: discussion; Dean Clarence Man- 
ion; Su; 15 min. 

Quaker State Oil Refining Corp.: Quaker State "i 1 : Game of 
the Day; Sa; 60 min.; Sports Flashes With Frankie Frisch; Sa,Su; 
30 min. 

Radio Bible Class: religious; Radio Bible Class; Su; 30 min. 
R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co.: Camel; Camel Scoreboard; Su-Sa; 35 
min.; Winston; Winston Scoreboard; Su-Sa; 35 min. 
Rhodes Pharmacol Co.: [mdrin; Gabriel Heatter Sews; Tu; 5 min. 
Sleep-Eze Co.: Sleep-Eze; Gabriel Heatter Sews; Su; 5 min.; Truf 
Detective Mysteries; M: 5 min.; Treasure Agent; Tu; 5 min.; ' 
Busters; W; 5 min.: Sei rets of Scotland Yard; Th : 5 min.: 
Counter-Spy . F : 5 min. 

Voice of Prophecy: religious; Voice of Prophecy; Su; 30 min. 
Wings of Healing: religious: Wings of Healing; Su; 60 min. 
Word of Life Fellowship: religious; Word of Life Hour; Sa; 30 min. 



NBC 



Allis-Chalmers: institutional; Nat'l. Farm & Home Hour; Sa; 25 

min. 

American Institute of Men's & Boys' Wear: clothing; Monitor; 

5 Sa; 70 min. 

American Motors: Rambler: Monitor; Sa.Su: 55 min. 

American Oil: Amoco products: Monitor: Sa.Su; 50 min. 

Billy Graham Evangelistic Assn.: religion; Hour of Decision: Su : 

30 min. 

Bristol-Myers: Bufferin; Hourly News: M-F; 105 min.. 21 30-ser 

Brown & Williamson: Kools, Vicerov; Hourly News: M-F; 215 min.. 

42 30-sec. 

Carter Products: \rrid. 30 min.: Little Liver Pills. 60 min.: Band- 



■ 
ik \. 

min. 
Chrysler Corp. Do 

10 mill. 
DcSoto: Dl 5( in. 

Equitable Life Assurance: Mr. 

lo 6 M-l 6-* ' M.W . 

I . I ■ '. . Monil 

Evangelistic Foundation: religion; B 5 min. 

Ex-Lax: I \ I x ' ' •and . 

M.W rh,F; 2 I ec; Pepper 

min One M Mil m mm.. 

W . min 

n.; My \ M.W.I 

Foster-Milburn: Doan'e pills; '/• mn. 

R. T. French Co.: bird seed; I/. / Stoi I I lo nun. 
General Foods: In I 

'-' I min. 

General Mills: I heerios; Monitoi - - mm.. II 
• i ; Trut ' ' i 

Ml. I M.W I 

' i i Woi tan In My H 

General Motors Corp.: CMC Inul-: 

15 MUM. 

Gillette: Gilli tl l mi prod, I 

25 min. 

Grove Labs: Fiti shall products; - - min. 

Hotpoint: various; Bandstand; M.W.ThJ ; 4 I min.; 

Man's Family I.I LO min., -' Star 

M.W : _' 10-sec.; Peppei I . !• I Moni- 

S <. v u : 10 min.. I 
Insurance Co. of N. America: Lnsuranci Monitor; - - min. 

Lever Bros.: Pepsodent; Bandstand; M I station bn 

M-F; 10 6-sei | Sews of the W ,,r ! d ; 'lu.lli.l-: "• I 
I ii. rh; 9 6-sec; Monitor; s i - 

Lutheran Laymen's League: religion; Lutheran Hour; Su; 30 min. 
Mack Trucks: Trucks; Monitor; I 3 min. 

Massey-Harris-Ferguson: farm implements; S min. 

Midas: cai mufflers; Monitor; Su; 5 min. 
Morton Salt: salt: Alex Dreier- \ Sa; 5 min. 

Mutual of Omaha: insurance; On the Line With Considine . - 
15 min. 

North American Van Lines: movil - 3 min. 

Northwest Airlines: air travel; Monitor; Sa S 'nin. 

Pabst Brewing: beer; Monitoi I Su; 75 min. 

Pan American Coffee Bureau; Truth Or Consequences; 

M-F; 5 min.: 1 30-sec. 

Pepsi-Cola: Pepsi-Cola: Monitor: - - SO min., 10 30 - 
Plough, Inc.: St. Joseph aspirin, children's aspirin. Dr. Ed> 
■ ili\-- tablets, Mexana; Monitor: 5a£u; 55 min., 9 3o 
Quaker Oats: Quakei oats; I ily; M; 

Stai Mat ' ■■■ IH. Tli : 2 i /" Hj Houst M.W . . 

-.-..: Mfoin.r . Sa; I tO-s M.W. Th.F: 

\ 6-sec. 

Quaker State Oil; motor oil: Monitor: Sa.Su; 30 min. 
Ralston-Purina: feed division: Harkne<< Sews; Mr: 25 min. 
RCA: various; Monitor - 5 in. 

R. J. Reynolds: Camel; News of the World; M-F; 25 min.: Prince 
Mbert; Grand Ole Opry; Sa; 30 min. 

Richfield Oil: oil products: Richfield Reporter; Su-F: 90 min. 
Rubberoid Co.: supplies; ! S 3 min. 

Skelly Oil: oil; Ales Dreiei Vei - 90 min. 

Sleep-Eze: sleep aid-: Peoplt tn Funny; W . > i ! The 

World: T.Th; 10 min. 
Sterling Drug: Haley's MO; Bandstand: M.W'.F: 15 min.: Five 

Matinee; M-F; 25 min. 
Sun Oil: oil; Three Star Extra: M-F: 75 min. 
Swift & Co.: Ml- urine; Tr • < II. 

5 min.: M\ Tl 5 W I ! ."-.... 10 min.; Bandstand: 

Tu-F; I 10-se . 10 mum. try; F; 5 min.; 

Matinee; W .1 10-sec*, ~> min.; Woman In M\ House; Th.F: lo 

min. 

Time, Inc.: I ife magazine; Hourly Vews; M-F; 110 min.. 
Vick Chemical Co.: Vicks Vaporub; various programs; Tu-Sa; 30 

Voice of Prophecy: relijiiciii: Voice ol Prophecy; Su : 30 min. 
Waverly Bonded Fabrics: fabrics; Monitor: Sa.Su: 50 min. 
Whitehall Pharmacol Co.: \ii.nm; Bandstand: M.T.Th : 15 min.: 
True Confessions; M.W.F: 15 min.: Itlairs ot f)r. Gentry; M.W ; In 
min.; Five Star Matinee: M.W.F; 15 min.: Woman In 1/v House: 
Tu.Th.F: 1"> min.: Sighttine; Tu.W.Th: 15 min.: Monitor: I - 
5 min.. 1 b-' ■ . 



47 



Channel 2 



tuns rmtfg around... 

*" At 

the Land of yffM ard^pmul 




... and nearly a million people 
live within that "B" ring! 



Vep'Bigget'n Baltimote! 



(ill 2© 

|00.0°? 




4S 



SPONSOR • 14 SEPTEMBER 1957 



Reports and evaluates news, trends, 
opinions foi film buyers and tellers 



FILM-SCOPE 



14 September Barter continues to tantalize bigger and bigger agencies ;m<l their clicnU 

Cteyrliht l»57 

sponsor publications inc tnia week McCann-Erickson is readying a teal of barter time for K1n.iI Dojj 

Food in one i » f the 1" majoi markets. ' Ii will run about six months 

Meantime ."> I>a\ Pads (owned b) Associated Products, Inc., along with Rival) hints 
thal it. too, is investigating the mattei through Grey. 

Between the dark and the daylight is the children - hour not onlj in poetry, but also 
in t\ and after that what? Rrid^inj: tin- gap from kid*- fare t<» grown*up programs 
smoothly always lias been a problem. 

This week \\M\I.-T\. Washington, thinks ii has found a transition: 
• \t (i P.M. (following the Micke) Mouse Club) will come a half-hour block of syndi- 
cated adventure tilms five days a week: Sheena, Foreign Legionnaire, Sk) King, lungle 
Jim, Brave Eagle. 

From 6:30-7 will be a family block: Three Musketeers, Judge !!•• Bean S 



• 



lion Theatre. Soldiers of Fortune. Frontier Doctor. 



First-run syndication usually interests onlj the big Fellows and the t\ veterans. But 
this week CBS" Gray Ghosl lias attracted: 

1) Two sponsors who are brand new to t\. and 

2i Three who have been using chiefly spot during the past year. 

I he lineup: Colonial Stores. Loblaw's Super Market-. Habitant Soups, Welch 
Grape Juice, and Winn Dixie Stores. Tins quintet will -pan more than one-third oi the 
nation's major markets (33). 

For its fourth year, H. J. Heinz will Bponsor "Studio 57" in 53 market- for . 
52-week run. 

WrekK time and program costs will come to approximate!} v 7''.."" n . Maxon, Inc. 
the agency. 

\ bi«j play — backed h> name power and based on true storie i- in the mak- 
ing in the foreign intrigue category. 

In the forefront is "The Diplomat" series b) < BS-TV I ilm Sales and "Mr. Con- 
sul," slated for production this fall 1>\ Derel Produi ing Vssoi iates. 

The CBS half-hour entrj i- based <>n the operations of the Foreign Service Branch 
of tlie State Dept. — perhaps with tin- official seal of that agency. Clare Luce Booth will 
he hostess if the series is sold (though she won't appear in the pilot). 

"Mr. Consul" will get its material and technical advice from l'\ ( (| l! (Diplomatic «\ 
Consular Officers Retired — an organization numbering some 750 former consuls, diplo- 
mats, ambassadors, etc.) Bernie Luber will be producer, Eddie Sutherland director, and 
Robert Montgomery i- possible host. The syndicator currentl) most interested in "Mr. 
Consul" has no network connection. 

Matty Fox ^ ill soon he complete!} out of Guild. The compan) i- due t.> buj the 
remaining 200.1 mm) -hares of his stock. 



SPONSOR • 1-1 SEPTEMBER 1957 1'' 



FILM-SCOPE continued 



Film people who subscribe to the cyclical theory of trends are betting that 
mystery-type shows are due for a real rise. 

I heir reasoning is ]>ased on more than the fact that sale- <>l mysteries via new pilots 
are relativel) high this fall (FILM-SCOPE, 7 September, page 61). Statistics earry an 
even bigger weight. 

Plotted that way, mysteries hit their low on the networks in earl) 1956 when only 
I were telecast. Now the cyele is on the upswing again, thus: 



MONTHS 

Oct.-Dec. '52 
Jan. -March '53 

Vpril-June 
Jul\ -Sept. 
Oct.-Dec. 
Jan.-Marcli '."> I 

\|u il-June 
Jul) -Sept. 
Oct.-Dec. 
Jan.-March '55 
April-June 
July-Sept. 
Oct.-Dec. 
Jan.-March '56 
April-June 
July-Sept. 
Oct.-Dec. 
Jan.-Feb. '57 



AVERAGE NO. SHOWS 

18 
16 

16 

14 
13 
15 
14 
12 
10 

8 

8 

8 

5 

4 

5 

6 

7 

6 



AVERAGE RATINGS 

28.4 
28.7 
26.0 
26.7 
25.8 
24.2 
21.3 
20.4 
19.9 
22.3 
20.7 
19.6 
23.4 
24.2 
21.6 
18.7 
25.2 
27.2 



(Source: NTI 1st & 2nd reports) 



Motivations probers (notably Schwerin) think they have found the major keys that 
unlock the perennial success of mysteries. Among them: 

1) By and large, mystery shows appeal strongly to women. An "officiaF-type 
program in the documentary vein, however, will boost the male audience. 

2) It isn't the puzzle element alone that makes mysteries enchanting. Human sus- 
picion and the perseeution complex are involved, too. Thus many people apparently 
identify the sinister characters with neighbors, mothers-in-law, etc. 

3) A slight case of murder helps. I But knowing producers frown on too much 
blood: thev say it's self-defeating in the long-run.) 

4) In swindles and con episodes, you get better results by having a wealthy 
victim than a poor one. 

5) This preference for seeing milionaires bilked isn't due to just a mildly vengeful, 
soak-the-rich urge. Probably more important is the idea that millionaires are glamor- 
ous while poor stiffs merely are sordid. 



FLASHES FROM THE FIELD: A topflight syndicator this week completed a study 
on the value of star personal appearances, and the conclusion it drew was: P.A. tours do 
not tend to boost ratings; rather, they are goodwill builders with clients, stations, etc. 

The first Latin-American sale of the half-hour Hopalong Cassidy series which 
have been dubbed into Spanish was made to WKAQ-TV, Puerto Rico, by Freemantle 
Overseas Radio & TV Corp. . . . Big news south of the border is the increasing number 
of feature film sales to sponsors thru agencies such as JWT — features were former- 
l\ spotted only as non-sponsored stopgaps. 

(For other film news and comment, see News and Idea Wrap-Up, page 62.) 






:,(i 



IHNSOR 



14 SEPTEMBER 1957 




ARE YOU 

HALF-COVERED 



IN 



NEBRASKA'S OTHER BIG MARKET? 



Have you noticed how much the Nielsen 
NCS No. 2 has expanded lincoln-land? 




ARB SURVEY — LINCOLN-BEATRICE MARKET 
June 9-15, 1 957 — 8:30-1 0:00 P.M. 

This special \KB Survej of the Lincoln-Beatrice market 
■ru recentl) made at the request oi an important national 
advertiser. It shows thai even in EASTERN Lincoln-land 

oiil > . K< > I VT\ gets more than twice u* many viewers a- 

tln leading Om.ilri station! 





Rating 


Share 


KOLN-TV 


29.5 


57.0 


Station B 


12.5 


24.2 


Station C 


9.5 


18.4 


Others 


.2 


.4 



^ 



**'"-'*,, 







ffltefo/ytff /a/ion 

wKZO TV — GRAND RaPiDS-KaLAmaZOO 
WKZO RADIO — KALAMAZOO BATTLE CREEK 
wjef RADIO — GRAND RAPIDS 

WJEFFM — GRAND RAPIDS KALAMAZOO 
KOLN TV — LINCOLN. NEBRASKA 
Atioc A'^d - "l 

WmBD RADIO — PEORIA. ILLINOIS 



K.OI^^T-TV« one of America's ^r.-.it area stations, 
covers Lincoln-land — a rich 69-countj market thai t- as 
independent of Omaha .i- Hartford i- of Providence ... or 
South Bend i~ of Fori \\ .i\ ne. 

Lincoln-land has 296,200* families with 191,710* I \ sets. Ml 
surveys, including the latesl 12-countj Videodex, ahoM thai 
Ki ILN-TN urt- the lion's share <>( the audience, .ill the time! 

\-k Ivery-Knodel for ..II the facts on KOLN-TV, the Offi< iaJ 

( IBS ( >ut let for South Central Nebraska and Northern k.m-.i-. 

•See NCS No. 2 

CHANNEL 10 • 316,000 WATTS • 1000-FT. TOWER 

KOLN-TV 

COVERS LINCOLN-LAND —NEBRASKA'S OTHER BIG MARKET 
Avery-Knodel, Inc. Exclusive National Representatives 



SPONSOR 



14 SEPTEMBER 1 ' » ~> 7 



51 



ABN and NEILSEN 

i ( ontinued from page 57 i 

people lune in to radio. I spe< iall) 
those who listen in groups "I one. 

Eastman is a real I elievei in the 
personal intei \ iew and pointed oul 
,i i- h idils used l>\ the ( ensus Bu 
nun. \- .1 mattei "I fa< i. he feels 

thai tin- < »n I \ w.n all listenin ul. I 

be caught would be, il it wen- possi 
lie through some coincidental person 
,il interview technique with interview- 
• i- catching the entire famil) audit 
.il the time "I listening .it home, in the 
i ut • >. during recreation, while shop 
ping, etc. 

Since the first Pulse Report will not 
be oul until Novembei and since it 
will be oul once a month, \l!\ will 
supplement these ratings with tele- 
phone coincidental reports in sele t d 
i it * * — to be done l>\ either Hoopei oi 
rrendex. I hese reports w ill be done 
for management onl) and their pur- 
pose \\ ill nol be to tall) the total ra- 
dio audience l>ut to provide quick in- 
dications of how a program i- doing. 

Tlic first of VBN's five new hour- 
long weekday >lri|>-. the Herb 'Oscar 1 



I !!<!■ Shou i 

It replaced the and 

follows the Breakfast Club t.> pro 
a two-houi block from 9:00 to I I 00 
in tin- moi inn I hi n u dl also be 
two-houi bloi k- in the . > ) t • i noon and 

e\ .in 

Starting ..-. . October, the |" i 
In. in I :00 to '• 00 p.m. will 
pied b) the Jimmy R ou .u\>\ 
the lim I ■ 5 v. Starl n the 
e dati i nighttime show h iili Mei \ 
(.iillm a> m.c. will k it k ..Il 
riod a- \ el undetei mined I \nothei 
i ighttime show i- -till to be ■ I 

\- i- ■ I. mi lj apparent i" the ii ade 
I \ now . I astman and his ning 

\ .p., Stephen I .abunski, are betl 
tl ai live music i~ the answei to 
work radio's programing problems. Ml 
five shows iall in thai i il It is 

also apparent thai these Bhows lend 
themselves i" the showmanship and 
salesmanship values Eastman bo high- 
l\ prizes. Vside from the fa< i there 
w ill be a big handful "I pers malities 

to d mmen ials foi sponsoi -. the 

personality show has alwa) - I i ■• 
favorite for the radio-h salesman. 
NBC Radio's Joe Culligan has often 



• II a 1 1 i Minalil \ than 
-\\<>w an) lit 

I here i» no doubt bul thai in \I'A - 
lineup I 
i distim ' 
doubl ih.it in Htri 

l- pull ii 

live !•-——■ •»• — learned 

independent f whi< l> 

I 1 
in ill. ii 
ban iei to theii j 

\- foi nellii I 

Harrisun « ill lead a i 
• ■ t F • • 1 1 r i :_- the new -li..w- in -• 
Pi units « ill ! • 

length. 

\nd lii there !•• no 
it. \ l!\ - sale? 

ili. in r\ ident. \\ • 1 1 ■ \ B 
I' I - I • -nd < loldenson w i II in 
la) ..ut the money, I 

.•ii the 

network radio I It i- his in- 

tention to keep them bus) in 
i ..IN. ( In. i the hinterlands 

■ ontinuall) puni hing a - i B > 
man believes in sellii ^ 



5HE WAS MY FIRST LOVE 



iv to say it now. She was only eight 
id I was not much older, really. Hut 
a my first love, as she was the first love ol 
Americans. 

the matter is that even as an eight- 
Shirley Temple had that certain magic. 
• i meat personality. The magic ol 
able to take you out of yourself. The magic 

niding release from a less magical world. 

.i word, she had talent. It seems incredible 
uch a tinv creature could sing the way she 
Could dance the way she could. Could 
re the heart of America the way she did. 

I she diil all these things so well that sin- 
test motion picture personality of her 
causing a stampede of admirers that prob 
tobf a little child could lead. 

1 like to see her again as she was at her peak 
10, 111 wager, would my children, who are 



Vi, . 



about the same age now thai Shirlej Temple 
was then. Together, we'd experience tbj 
netjsm that comes from the pleasure ol truly 
great entertainment. 

As it happens. ni\ children and I will have 

that opportunity shortly, when tour ol Shirlej 
Temple's greatest motion picture triumphs will 
be seen on television from coast to coast on 
Am. ilia's dynamic new NTA Film Netv 

Along with millions ol Othei 'is. I 

will re-discover my first love and my children 
will discovei thai certain m the first time. 

But this time, we'll experience that pleasure 

■ 'ut! 

o • 

/ Michtom, chairman of the hoard of the 
Ideal Ton Company. 

our first love, too, I'hiU's why ii. pur- 

chased one-third sponsorship of th: 

program 



1 in Ml Ml iff I 11 



•>..•:.-.- 



Oy> 



'AOmc*<! TtCur- 



N A 



F=II_IV1 
NETWORK 



60 WEST 55TH STREET. NEW YORK 19. N.Y. ■ PLAZA 7 i ■ 



' NSOR • 14 SEPTEMBER IS51 



\ I )\ ERTISERS. PLEASE NOTE: 

I he N I V t ibn Ni t« "rk proudh prrtcntt 
fiuir izre.it Slnrli r) temple mastefJM 

produced to 2<>ili ( entary-1 ox... 

including tuch all-time triumph* 

■ W illic W 

rbesc outstanding feature ftlrm will 
receive national television coverage 

on four S 

lx r 2<Hh and I 

The] «ill h«- ibown "ii television *t I 

rr.K b • I s I \ . . , m r< . . . 

at the m 

—the Hob'da) 5 

I ' 1 1 < > 1 1 1- . Wriie or « rid toda) f'»r 
■creeninp and comp - . . . 

wli. • manufa • 

hinj 
iiilti- 

nullion dollar 

These outstanding Shirley Temple film* will 
ynu the maximum e\: 

■ . • • 

n a pad thai 

. to the .i 
the st 11-. 







The only station covering all of Oklahoma's No. 1 Market 

Broadcast Center • 37th fir Peoria 

GUSTAV BRANDBORG 
Vice Pres. & Gen. Mgr. 

Represented by EDWARD PETRY & CO. 



HAROLD C. STUART 
President 




1 170 KC • 50,000 WATTS • CLEAR CHANNEL • NBC 
"The Voice of Oklahoma" 



TV COSTS 

(Continued from page 35) 

we may have to take up the problem 
through the ANA." 

7. Show rehearsal time will prob- 
ably start getting a thorough going- 
over, since the cost of renting a major 
studio runs approximately $8,000 a 
dav. When clients start asking for bud- 
get breakdowns, prior to agreeing to a 
package price, this will be one item that 
will get an extra look. 

The only answer, according to clients 
and agencymen alike, lies in more care- 
ful planning prior to actual production 
time. And most advertisers agree that 
this is where their agency will have to 
come in, on package shows as well as 
those where the agency takes a more 
active part, or clients will be taking 
over more show control themselves. 

8. Sets have been getting more and 
more elaborate and costly. Yet few 
clients would suggest taking money 
away from them, for fear of tampering 
with the quality of the show. 

'"It's getting tougher and tougher to 
get a rating," said the advertising di- 
rector of an appliance manufacturer. 
"I'd be afraid to take anything off the 
screen. I don't want to water down my 
show with second-class talent and I 
don't want second-rate production 
values. The question is just whether 
there's need for as much waste behind 
the scenes as we seem to be uncover- 
ing. 

If anything, the trend in scenery in 
this competitive year will be toward 
even more expensive jobs. 

9. Bad scheduling of talent can add 
a good chunk to the advertisers cost; 
SAG minimums are on a fairlv high 
level these days. What clients object 
to most are the number of stories about 
actors and extras on call for a certain 
day's shooting who end up just sitting 
around for the dav because the director 
never gets around to that scene. 

"It's true that the packager absorbs 
these costs," says the ad manager of a 
drug firm. "But eventually they're 
passed along to us in the form of in- 
creased package show costs during the 
next season. It's really time for all 
parts of the tv industry to pull in its 
belt and watch costs more carefully. 
None of us want to trim our tv budgets. 
We just want to use the money more 
effectively." ^ 






54 



sl-ONSOK 



11 SEPTEMBER 1957 




GOOD 
WAY 
TO 
TELL 
A STORY. 



■ ■ 



GOOD 
WAY 




MAKE 



STICK. 



Take a tip from Dodge on how 
to generate more ad mileage. 
Pyramid the power of your 
TV commercial by converting 
it to the permanency of print. 
Capitalize on TV GUIDE'S 
persuasive connection with 
5.3 million TV families who buy 
it every week . . . read it . . . 
refer to it . . . are exposed 
to it every day. This kind of 
repeated reader reference 
means seven-day ad exposure. 
Exploit it. 




-o 
o 



3 

o 



>- 
o 

Q 



Circulation Now 5,300,000 



Tiljt-fl 



SPONSOR 



14 SEPTEMBER 195*3 



55 



SPONSOR ASKS 



What are the important trends in radio transcription services 





Dick Lawrence, general manager, 
World Broadcasting System 
The next \'2 months will bring a dra- 
matic development in local radio pro- 
graming. The fight for survival has 
been won; now each individual sta- 
tiori 1 1 1 1 i-t work In establish for itself 
.1 unique identity in its community. 

The coming \ car w ill sec a re\ ival of 
interesl in creative programing and 
dynamic merchandising. There will be 
a new emphasis on service — service to 
advertisers and service to audiences. 
I hi- emphasis must also be the dorni- 



"slicker, 
more 

professional 
programing" 



nant theme in transcribed programing. 

Main stations have built success on 
"music-and-news." If there were only 
one outlet in each market, that could 
be the universal approach to program- 
ing, hut competition not onlj exists, it 
is increasing. The most urgent item 
on am station-planning agenda has 
become: "\\ hat can we do to make our 
station different, outstanding'.'' How 
can we attract and hold listeners?" 

This ferment of activit) on the lo- 
cal level is reflected in our own ex- 
panded services. No longer do we of- 
fer a "music library." Outstanding 
transcriptions b) record stars are no 
longer enough in themselves. We have 
rebuilt the librarj into a creative pro- 
graming and sales tool. 

Our emphasis now is on programing 

ice, showmanship aids, complete 

chandising plans ideas exclusive- 

lv for radio that can give a station an 

outstanding personality. 

\\ hal stations seek now arc such 
-i i vices as our open-end jingles, which 
give local advertisers quality musical 
commercials that are otherwise possi- 
ble onlv for giant advertisers. 



Sponsors can expect slicker, more 
professional programing. Few outlets 
could afford to have a major orchestra 
custom-record the musical signatures 
and program lead-ins that raise the 
production values of a show. Stations 
are turning to us for such showman- 
ship ingredients and they are making 
greater use of our across-the-board 
programing, and scores of other serv- 
ices which supplement news, sports, 
and local personalities. 

Sponsors can look forward to great- 
er merchandising support through 
transcribed services. One sign of sta- 
tion interest is the tremendous response 
we've had on our Sound-0 game. It is 
an exciting merchandising and selling 
idea exclusively for radio, based on ra- 
dio sound effects and their identifica- 
tions. Stations broadcast our recorded 
mystery sounds — they might be a Die- 
sel train, a duck call, a streetcar's rat- 
tle. Listeners correctlv identifying 
these sounds win substantial prizes 
supplied by local merchants. 

These are big ideas, planned for 
lug operation. They are not simply 
1 udget-stretchers. New business that is 
headed radio's way this year will go to 
the stations that are most aggressive 
and foresighted. 

Those that succeed will do so by es- 
tablishing their own identity as the 
creative station in their market. 

James D. Langlois, Lang-Worth Feature 

Programs, Inc., Veu ) ml. 
Developments in a service business 
such as transcriptions must keep in 
step — and even anticipate the trend 
in broadcast programing and selling. 
The strong, almost unanimous move 
in radio is toward the music-and-news 
format. Thus — in addition to main- 
taining Lang-Worth Music libraiv and 
feature programs — we have concen- 
trated on a new service that aids and 
complements the radio station s music- 
and-news pattern, program and sales- 
wise. The service, L-W Radio lluck- 
slers \ \ii lifts i released as of '56 with 



over 750 jingle units growing at a rate 
of 200 or more per \ ear i . is expanded 
with numerous station aids. 

Radio Hucksters serve virtually all 
categories of industrj and retail busi- 
ness. The jingles are open-end and 
open-middle t<> permit insertion of lo- 
cal copv so as to be indistinguishable 
from tailor-made production. 

The airlifts portion of the service, 
mi the other hand, consists of station 
programing aids such as: intros to pro- 
grams including lime and Weather, 
station I.D.'s, fanfares, sound effects 
and teasers. 

Although this service trend mav not 
-live the needs of the large national 
advertiser who provides his own jin- 
gles, vet it is geared to give the advan- 
tage of commercial jingles to many 
tens of thousands of local businesses 
and regional manufacturers. These 
many sponsors of Radio Hucksters \ 
Airlifts enjov the attention-getting 
value of musical commercials, strong 



"follow the 

customer" 



product identification and continuity 
ill program mood which is now so 
prevalent in broadcast advertising. 

So it is not a policy of "follow the 
leader"' hut of ""follow the customer""- 
ours and our stations' — in Lang- 
Worth s pursuit of leadership. 

A. B. Sam brook, manager, RCA Record- 
ed Program Services 
Selling the product is as challenging a 

job for radio transcription services as 
it is for the advertiser who pavs the 
hill. In this regard, RCA Thesaurus 
provides radio sponsors I through sub- 
scriber stations) a wide variety of 
pre-tested commercial features. 




50 



SPONSOR 



I I SEPTEMBER L951 




Included in the K< \ I hesaui ua li 
brar) are commercial lead-ins, open- 
end jingles .iml Bales-merchandising 
i ampaigns w hich ha> e paid « » IF in in- 
creased Bales time and time again. 
Here are .1 few highlights: 

'Sales boostei campa i'j ns. I le 
Bigned pi imai il) l"i local satural ion 
announcement campaigns Produced 
ilii- year, the first campaign released 



"brought 
5,000 to a 
\li<><- sale 



features "Double Talk" bj M Kelly. 
Sixtj recorded humorous tracks b) \l 
^'•ll\ put the spotlight on the spon. 
soi - commercials. \ furniture store 
in Marysville, California bought 35 
-|hi|- weekl) for ~>2 week- over Kl l>\. 
I he sponsor is so pleased w iili results 
thai he's planning to extend the cam- 
paign into other markets where the 
< Lain operates. 

"'Sell tunes." Over 2. 000 singing 
commercial jingles for year 'round 
campaigns. Over 70 different sponsoi 
categories, plus special jingles for the 
different holidays and seasons, arc in- 
cluded. Sponsors use them t<> good 
advantage in large as well as small 
markets. For example, a Philadelphia 
finance companj used a ~>2 week cam- 
paign employing RCA Thesaurus 
weather jingles over \\ RC\ with ex- 
cellent results in a town where loan 
competition is keen. 

"Shop at the store with the mike on 
the door. \ copyrighted, coordinated 
sales-merchandising campaign which 
has been tremendously successful for 
sponsors. Basically, il consists of re- 
corded announcements 1>\ big nan e 
stars urging listeners to shop at stores 
with the radio station's microphone on 
the door. RCA Thesaurus provides 
colorful decals for posting on spon- 
sors doors and windows. In Atlanta 
over Wi/K. "Shop \t The Store" 
brought 5,000 listener-customers to a 
shoe sale. 

RCA fhesaurus, through il- sub- 
scribers, provides radio advertisers 

with expertl} produced, pre-tested com- 
mercial radio features. These features 
give advertisers complete, effective and 
economical radio advertising cam- 
paigns thai "pa) ofT." f? 



TOP SALESMAN 

in Northern New England's 
billion dollar market 

WCSH-TV w.th 4toi 

domination of 13-county two- 
state area delivers 60% of 
Maine's income plus $266 mil- 
lions from New Hampshire 












100 UV \ 

_ , ■ ~. FRANKLIN 

Rumtord ■""•«», /— 


y^z) 












• _L /__ 


^ 9 *" 








^aT&rviMe J 


fc 


coos 


, fV \ 

0XFORO Closs B |o|,f 


Augusta^. 


\ 




HA A IMC / - 1 KENNEBEC «-— ' I 

MAINE / * I > 






~~ /Auburn? 




\\ 




s^ \y • m V 






* 7 

£ J 


C^ Ylewistorw 


/ LINCOLN,. 
J* I A 

—5. 1 1 




#1 — T 

u I j CARROLL 


r CUMBERLAND 


1 oVJV 

r Tr 




_J\f EW 


* ^V Class A j{/ 






HAMPSHIRE 


\^K PORTLAND 




BELKNlP 7*^X 


1 YORK f ^ 






£v\ \ I 


iBiddeford^f 








I / 

\ M 






ROCKING 









Where 78% of the 221,990 households 

are television homes . . . 

Where 81% of income is spent each year . . 

WCSH-TV puts your message v 1oud and clear' 



;e May 4-10 area study — Market data 
1-1-57 SRDS estimates of consumer markets) 



WCSH-TV /a 

PORTLAND, MAINE 

Represented by WEED TELEVISION CORP 



SPONSOR 



14 SEPTEMBER 1957 






PRIMARY 
MARKET 



400,000 people in the 
Ann Arbor area respond 
primarily to local radio. 
It's a huge market AND 
NOT ADEQUATELY 
COVERED BY OUTSIDE 
STATIONS. 



ANN ARROR 

AREA 

Includes Plymouth, 
Ypsilanti, Livonia and 
23 important industrial 
communities in Michigan. 

FIRSTinPUlSE* 

Most recent Pulse 
indicates WHRV's strong 
superiority... 18 firsts 
(half hours) out of 24. 

WHRV 

1,000 watts abc 1600 kc 

Major league baseball, 
University of Mich, sports 
Detroit Red Wing Hockey 

6:00-9:00 A.M. Joe and Ralph, 
famous in Mich, area 



J] 



Write for special merchandising 
plan or contact: 

BOB DORE ASSOCIATES 

National Representatives 

the door is alivays open . . . 



Bob Dore Assoc, 420 Madison Ave., N. Y. 17, N. Y. 

* JUNE 'SS PULSE 



58 



Agency profile 



Frank Kemp: "Buying's not for lazy men" 

WW lici work i- concerned. I rank Kemp. Compton v.p. in 

charge of media, is a real homegrown product: He started at Comp- 
ton as a general clerk in media in 1939 and grew up through the 
ranks. 

"I actually got into this husiness accidentally." he told SPONSOR. 
"\fter leaving MIT. I was installing IBM systems in various banks. 
Then I ran into a man. who'd gone to school with me and he 
suggested that I come into Compton." 

After the war. Kemp took a six-month break in the "outside 
world." joining Dancer-Fitzgerald-Sample as media director. He 
then returned home to Compton once more. 

Today some 00% of Compton's 370 million annual billings are 
in air media. 

"In our agency I don't see tv as being soft at all," Kemp told 




1 w^ 0^ 

"When on vacation, really play, but in the oilier there's no relaxing." 

sponsor. "Although it may be true that we're leaning a little more 
heavily toward network than spot this year, because some of the 
new products we were introducing with spot have matured to 
national distribution." 

Kemp feels that on an industry-wide basis, however, Compton's 
trend is likeK to be balanced by other agencies with new products 
to introduce this \ear. 

"One thing that would certainh attract more people into spot 
tv," he says, "would he organizing a Clearing House that would 
handle part of the billing. Such a Clearing House would send one 
bill to an agencv per client, and save the agenc) and client a lot of 
its overhead in manpower used for paperwork handling billing 
from hundreds of different stations. 



SPONSOR 



14 SEPTEMBER 1937 










Radio Chicago 



WSSB 

m9 I in Chicago 

in number of listeners 

for your advertising dollar! 

Compare: WJJD has lowest 
cost per thousand radio homes" 



STATION 


COST 


m 


THOUSAND 


WJJD 






$ .292 


Independent Station A 






.293 


Independent Station B 






.38 


Network Station A 






.75 


Independent Station C 






.82 


Independent Station D 






1.04 


Network Station B 






MO 


Network Station C 






1.78 


Independent Station E 






2.13 


'Comparison based on latest Pulse ratin 


q 


■for Chicago 


6-County Area, total rated time 


perioo 


r - 


D.m. 


Mon.-Fri., and rates for one-min 


Class 


A 


spots, - 


mum discount. 









Latest Hooper (July-August, 1957) shows: 



WJJD 2nd Noon-6 p.m., Mon.-Fri. 
WJJD 3rd 7 a.m. -Noon, Mon.-Fri. 



Keep your eye on these other Plough, Inc. Stations: 

Radio Baltimore Radio Boston Radio Memphis 

WCAO WCOP WMPS 

REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY RADIO-TV REPRESENTATIVES. INC. 



NEW YORK 
7 E. 47 St. 
MU 8-4340 



CHICAGO 

75 E. Wacker Dr. 

Fl 60982 



LOS ANGELES 

111 N. LaCienga Blvd. 

OL 5-7597 



BOSTON 

Statler Office Bldg. 

HU 2-4939 



ATLANTA 

217 Glenn Bldg 

JA 2 3872 



SAN FRANCISCO 

110 Sutter St. 

GA 1 6936 



SEATTLE 

Tower Bldg. 
EL 1868 



SPONSOR 



14 SEPTEMBER 1957 



59 




It is 
easier 
to 
reach 

BALTIMORE 

when 
you 
ride with 



REPRESENTED BY 



JOHN BLAIR AND CO. 



60 



Agency Profile continued . . 



Despite the costliness and difficult) of handling spot t\ in an 
agency, Kemp feels bullish about the medium. 

"It has certainl\ proved its >ales effectiveness to us on man\ 
different products and product problems," he says. "National media 
max he easier to buy. but a new product, for instance, usualh 
requires use of local media." 

In the last few \ears. new product introduction has become a 
pel project ol Kemps. He goes at the formulation of a new product 
media strateg) in tight cooperation with Compton's marketing de- 
partment, which furnishes him an actual bluebook of facts to work 
with, i Sec 11 \Ia\ 1957 i>suc for "How Compton launched Product 
N.'i 

"We feel there s no magic about the fad that a medium-sized 
agenc) rather than a small or giant one. is better equipped to intro- 
duce new products,' says Kemp. "A small agenc) couldn't afford 
sufficient staff for research people to do all the field work nece?-sar\ 
before pre-testing in a market. It couldn't absorb all the bookkeep- 
ing involved and the hea\ ier hours of media buying that a new 
rather than established product requires. On the other hand, the 
giant agencies tend to be more network-oriented and some are 
more reluctant to take the two- or three-year gamble on a new 
product before it becomes profitable to the agenc\ . 

Kemp i-ees 26-week network cycle!* in future 

In negotiating for network tv time. Kemp has been an advocate of 
greater flexibilit) of contracts. "The pattern will eventually have to 
be a 26-week initial cycle for film or a 13-week buy for live tv. Since 
the investment in shows is so immense today, all parts of the in- 
dustrj must make concessions to the client rather than locking him 
into a poor bet or only the giants will be able to afford the gamble 
e\ entuall) . ' 

An easy-going man with the sharp humor of understatement. 
Kemp gives the impression of working in an aura of relaxation. This 
impression, his associate media directors insist. i> dispelled \ery 
rapidlv when a problem arises or a particular media plan nee!s 
shaping. Then, the) say, Kemp puts in a 24-hour day with the 
deceptive ease of manner of a man recentl) returned from vacation. 

"Not that I'm opposed to vacations," Kemp's quick to mention. 
"In fact, what my wife and I like to do best on our vacations i- to 
travel to fairl) exotic places we haven't seen before." 

These trips can encompass South America or Europe, but one 
thing is certain: on vacations. Kemp gets \er\ far awa\ from his 
year-round habitats. During the normal work-year, he expects the 
same type of dedicated effort for work from his media director- and 
buyers he puts in himself. 

•'If all agenc) buyers do their job. there reall) shouldn't be such 
things as barter." he sa\s. "Apparently, some agenc) buyers are 
being laz) ami letting film salesmen go out and do their job. But 
part of the fault for barter max lie in the stations, too. who panic as 
soon as an\ of their marginal time goes unsold. We feel that all 
members of our industry, should pull together harder to maintain 
the stature and effectiveness of t\ advertising. ^ 



SPONSOR • M SEPTEMBER 1957 







Timebuyers! 



Now you can buy I I A in 

180 MARKETS-42 STATES 

including . . . 



STATION 



KROD 

WSUN-AM-TV 

WWPA 

WITH 

WGST 

WOWO 

WAPI-AM-TV 

WCKY 

WROW 

WOOD 

KROC 

WALA-TV 



CITY-STATE 



El Paso, Texas 
St. Petersburg, Fla. 
Williamsport, Pa. 
Baltimore, Md. 
Atlanta, Ca. 
Ft. Wayne, Ind. 
Birmingham, Ala. 
Cincinnati, Ohio 
Albany, N. Y. 
Grand Rapids, Mich. 
Rochester, Minn. 
Mobile, Alabama 



CLOSING DATE 




Jan. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Dec. 

Nov. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Nov. 

Oct. 

Nov. 



15th 

11th 

31st 

1st 

6th 

8th 

1st 

26th 

19th 

15th 

30th 

30th 



ON THE AIR 



March 1st 
Nov. 4th 
Jan. 6th 
Dec. 2nd 
Jan. 6th 
Jan. 6th 
Oct. 15th 
Nov. 4th 
Nov. 4th 
Jan. 6th 
Nov. 20th 
Jan. 6th 



1 Branham Co 

2. Vernard. Rmtoul. McConncll 

3 Burn-Smith 

4. Select Station Reps 

5 Avcry-Knodcl 

6 Peters Griffin Woodward 



John Blur Co 
AM Radio Sales 
Katz Agency 
Meeker Co 
H-R TV Inc 



COMMUNITY CLUB AWARDS 

PENTHOUSE SUITE. .527 MADISON AVENUE 
NEW YORK 22 • CALL PLaza 3-2842 



SPONSOR 



1 I SEPTEMBER 1 ( )">. 



I 




78 markets snapped up in first 
six weeks! Coca-Cola in Atlanta! 
NBC 0-&-0 in Los Angeles! 
Dixie Beer! Bowman Biscuit! 
Prescription 1500 in 10 markets! 
J. Carrol Naish, the NEW 
Charlie Chan, "the best ever 
to do the role." See it today, 
and you'll have to agree the 
new CHARLIE CHAN sells! 




Hurry! Marketsare 
being reserved 
today! Wire or 
phone for private 
screening! 



Television Programs of America, Inc. 
488 Mad. son Ave., N. Y. 22 • PLaza 5-2100 



News and Idea 
WRAP-UP 



62 



ADVERTISERS 

Campbell Mill spend $800,000 in 
spot radio to launch its three new 
soups this month. 

The new brands, turkey noodle, 
minestrone and chicken vegetable will 
also get network t\ hacking in October 
on Campbell's two shows. Lassie ( CBS 
TV) and Colt 45 (ABC TV). 

After initial introduction campaign 
a continuing schedule is planned for 
both radio and tv. 

BBDO is the agent \ . 

Trend of the times: Firestone 
Tire & Rubber is back in spot 
radio on a national basis for the 
first time in about 10 years. 

The campaign: 115 stations in 85 
markets. Average schedule: better 
than 50 announcements per station. 
Total cost: approximately $100,000. 
Sweeney & James, the agency. 

Last November. Firestone used 
spot radio but the campaign was 
limited to Northern states since Town 
& Country snow tires was the product 
plugged. 

Current promotions: Gillette is 

offering its annual premium tie-in 
with its World Series radio-tv broad- 
casts : "Signals, the secret language 
of baseball" booklet. It will be given 
out with purchases of razors and blade 
dispensers. Tv and radio are being 
used to back the promotion . . . P&G's 
Gleem has launched a $100,000 con- 
test centered around a picture puzzle 
showing a typical American family on 
vacation ( in a situation where "they 
can't brush after everv meal.") . . . 
American Dairy Association and 
the Chocolate Milk Foundation will 
sponsor jointly a mid-winter mer- 
chandising promotion, "Chocolate 
milk — serve it hot," starting in Jan- 
uary. Initial kickoff will be on the 
Perry Como Show (NBC TV). The 
promotion was tested in Indiana early 
this year and produced a measured 
71% increase among 58 participating 
dairies and an estimated 50'"? increase 



among all state dairies. For the new 
national campaign chocolate suppliers 
are working out ad schedules with lo- 
cal dairies which include a heaw 
allotment for local spot t\ . 

Tv receivers: RCA Victor has ex- 
panded its color line to include five 
more color receivers for a total of 16. 
New models are $50 to $100 higher 
than comparable models in current 
series . . . Westinghouse says its 
new 1958 line of tv receivers will be 
backed b\ a record advertising cam- 
paign. Starting date is 16 September 
with initial tv introduction on Studio 
One (CBS TV I . Strong local adver- 
tising support is also planned. 

Focus on personalities: Edward 
J. Pechin has been named assistant 
director of the Du Pont advertising 



You're headed in 

the right direction with 

Plough, Inc., Stations! 



Radio Baltimore 



WCA0 



Radio Boston 



Radio Chicago 

WJJD 



Radio Memphis 

WMPS 



WWW 



Represented nationally by 
RADIO-TV REPRESENTATIVES. INC. 

NEW TOBK • CHICAGO • BOSTON • SEATTL* 
ATLANTA • LOS ANGELES • SAN FRANCISCO 






SPONSOR 



14 SEPTEMBER 1957 



department. Pechm haa been ;i divi- 
sion manager oi product advertising 
. . . Wilson Edwards, formei vice 
president and general manager of the 
San Diego Broadcasting Co. I KSDO I 
baa joined the executive -t a tT of 
Breast-O'-Chicken Tuna . . . Dale O. 
ikridge da- been named manager 
nl advertising and -air- promotion 
for G.E. s television receiver depart- 
ment. Mcridge has previoush been 
assigned t" advertising and aalea pro- 
motion "I the companj s refrigeratoi 
line . . . Leslie K. Parkhnrsl has 
been u [>[><*« 1 to vice president and direc- 
tor nf marketing oi \.S.i{. Products 
(former]) American Safet) Razor 
Corp.). 

AGENCIES 

New partners in the reorganized 
Russell M. Seeds Co.) now to l»e 
known as Kt'yes, Madden «X Jones, 
are: 

Edward I). Madden, president, i- 
a television num. Madden was v.p. in 
charge "I t\ operations and sales for 
NBl More recently he's been with 
McCann-Erickson and bas just re- 
signed as vice president of Interna- 
tional Latex Corp. 

Freeman keyes. chairman of 
Seeds, will continue ;i> chairman of 
the new agenc) . 

Howard \. Jones, new executive 
vice president, has been executive 
vice president of the central creative 
staff at Grant. 

Uso joining the companj i> David 
Male rlalpern as senior vice president 
and genera] manager of the New York 
office, rlalpern previously was senior 
vice president and general manager of 
Joseph Katz Co. 

R ea lignm ent of Grant's adminis- 

trative staff works out like this: 

Lawrence R. Mcintosh, executive 

vice president, has been named super- 
visor of all domestic operations. He 
also will continue as manager of the 
Detroit office. 

Frederick E. Spence promoted to 
executive \i<e president and con- 
tinues to head the international di- 
vision. 

Paul L. Bradley, former vice pres- 
ident in charge of the West Coast, now 
moves east as manager of the New 
York office. 

John E. Gaunt, vice president and 
tv director, has been upped to tv di- 




JQ 



So -i 
JSottjing 

- Tl 

'til you 
hear from 
Hooper! 

In 




is now the 

number 1 

cost per thousand station 

in 



Get out the slide rule, figure again . . . Providence is no longer an 
automatic buy because WICE is on the move! Up and up the ratings 
go in just eleven months of Elliot management. Do nothing til you 
see Hooper, July and August. 



A. 



The ELLIOT STATIONS 

great independents • good neighbors 



TIM ELLIOT. President 



Akron. Ohio - WGUE WICE - Providence. R. I. 
National Representatives The John E. Pearson Co. 



SPONSOR 



14 SEPTEMBER 195*3 



63 



A pictorial review of local 
and national industry events 



PICTURE WRAP-UP 




Radio bulletin board provides latest news for Hotel Somerset A drive-in sidewalk cafe is WERE. Cleveland's welcome to 
patrons during Boston's recenl newspaper strike. Station WILD (for- d.j. Walt Henrich (1.). Fred Stashower of Lan^. Fisher a'rl 

meiK WBMS) supplied news. Similar services were run by WHDII Stashower, joins Walt in an "uncontinental" paper-cup of coffefl 





Tv is free on KBET and John Schachi 
(1.) and Harvey Tepfer, KBET-TV, Sacra- 
mento, try to keep it that nai h> alert- 
ing the public to the fee tv problem 



Red Cross thanks SSCB for its help. E. 
Roland Harriman (r.) presents Red Cross 
award to Hagan C. Bayles. SSCB. as Ad- 
\ i-i t i-iii" Council'- llenr\ C. Vi elide watches 





"Sure I use them." Dorothy Lamour a- 
sures Gene Foss, v.p., Grove Lahs. that 
she lake- 1 \\ ,i\ Cold Tablets at lir-t sneeze. 
Endorsements are theme of radio campaign 



Free admission to pajamad patron- was 
announced 1>> \\ s t.\ d.j. Tommy Charles 
for the Birmingham opening of "The Pajama 

Came." Oxer 1.01)0 -leep-u alkers accepted 



The big 1/5 of a big nation 



b" 







1/5 of total Canadian retail sales 

re made in our Hamilton -Toronto 
iagara Peninsular coverage area 

the actual figure is $2,722,91 1. ()()().<)(). Effective October 1. 1957 ( :i K A 1-TV will increase its power to 
B,000 watts. eW will serve the complete Hamilton-Toronto-Niagara Peninsula area close to 600,000 
Ipomes — 24.43', of the total TV sets in Canada. The 2.552.715 people within our coverage area will 
Und 556,732,000 for food: $76,848,000 for drugs; $126,133,000 for furniture. Total retail sales $2,722,911,- 
lf.00. Bv far the richest market in Canada. Source: Sales Management: Elliott Haynes 



WCH'TV channel 11 

* .RTHER INFORMATION CALL l\-. • • 




Canada 



pi 




PROGRAMMING - WJTV has 15 
out of the top 15 night-time shows 
— leads in share of audience in 
every time segment — morning, 
afternoon, and evening, Monday 
through Friday. WJTV has the 
Number One network once-a-week 
program, multi-weekly program, 
local program, and film program. 



First in the heart of 



PROMOTION - WJTV has the staff 
and facilities for doing a complete 
promotional job in all media. For 
example, WJTV programs are pro- 
moted daily in Mississippi's largest 
newspaper. 

^ l i ssissippi )!~^~^l~- 



WJTV 

JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI 




REPRESENTED 



THE 



AGENCY 



rector for Loth Grant's domestic and 
international operations. Gaunt will 
headquarter in Hollywood. 

Christopher Cross, vice president, 
has been made assistant to the presi- 
dent. 

New ageney appointments: N. 

W. Aver adds Armour & Co.'s canned 
meats, beef, pork, sausage divisions 
and corporate advertising . . . BBDO 
for W. A. Sheafler Pen Co.'s new ball- 
point pen . . . Young & Rubicam for 
Beech-Nut Food Division of Beech- 
Nut Life Savers . . . SSC&B for 
Duffy-Mott . . . Tatham-Laird for 
Betty Crocker Muffin Mixes. This is 
a new product . . . DFS for Bayer 
Nasal Spray radio and tv advertising. 

Allen & Marshall, Los Angeles, has 
opened a new food and drug market- 
ing division. Arnold Blitz, former ex- 
ecutive vice president of H. Richard 
Seller Co., Portland, Ore., will head 
the new department and direct mer- 
chandising and marketing for all the 
agency's accounts. 

People in the news: Hendrik 
Booream, Jr. has joined Ogilvy, 
Benson & Mather as vice president and 
director of tv-radio. Booream comes 
from C. J. LaRoche . . . John A. 
Ulrich, formerly with Beech-Nut Life 
Savers, has joined DCSS as an account 
executive . . . Bernard I. Burt has 
joined the Benjamin Katz Agency. 
Philadelphia, as an account executive 
and public relations director . . . 
Harold I. Seltzer has left his post as 
vice president of White Frost Chemi- 
cals to join Doyle. Dane. Bernbach as 
merchandising account representative. 



NETWORKS 

Which product categories Mill 
dominate which nights on network 
tv this season? Here's the answer 
as compiled from SPONSOR'S 
1957 season fall program charts: 



DAY 

Sun. 

Mon. 

Tue. 

Wed. 

Thurs. 

Fri. 

Sat 

*Tied. 



1ST PLACE 

Toiletries 

Food & Auto* 

Toiletries 

Food 

Food 

Food & Cigs.* 

Toiletries 



2ND PLACE 

Cigarettes 

Toiletries 

Food 

Soaps — Cleansers 

Auto & Toiletries* 

Auto 

Cigs. & Food* 






Network tv notes: G.E. Theatre 

I CBS TV) will make its first overseas 
film I in England l on 23 September. 



66 



SIM1VSOH 



14 SEPTEMBER 1957 










SPONSOR • 14 SEPTEMBER 1957 



67 






You're in 
good company 
on WGN-RADIO 
Chicago 




Top-drawer advertisers 
are buying WGN 

Join the nation's smartest 
time-buyers who select WGN 
for results! Consistent high 
program quality, at the lowesl 

cost. make-. \\ GN a good buy 
— your smartest buy today in 
Chicaiiolain! ! 




883,700 

AND ONLY ONE 
TV STATION IN THIS 
37 COUNTY MARKET 



<:«>" 



ABC . 



NT* 




Blair Televijion Associate!, Rep. 



II successful, plans call for several 
more European-shol programs this 
year . . . The Nat Kin- Cole Show's 
coop plan is alread) getting good re- 
sponse from NBC I \ affiliates. So far 
the show I seen Tuesdays 7:30-8 p.m.) 
has picked up these local sponsors: 
Gallo and Colgate in Hollywood, Ital- 
ian Swiss Colotn in San Francisco, 
Gunther Brewing in Washington, I). 
C, Pittsburg Wine in Pittsburgh and 
Reingold Beer in New York and Hart- 
lord. Conn. ... In a sudden and sur- 
prise move Philip Morris has 
switched the Mike Wallace Interview 
show to Saturda) nights at 10 p.m. on 
ABC TV starting this week. The 
switch coincided with the cigarette 
firm's renewal of the series and is de- 
signed to take advantage of the pre- 
built Laurence Welk audience. \\ elk > 
high-rated show runs from 9-10 p.m. 
Saturda\ s . . . The Price Is Right 
nighttime version (Morulas 7:30-!! 
p.m. I will get $500,000 worth of pro- 
motional backing h\ its two sponsors 
Speidel and RCA . . . Minnesota 
Mining and Mfg. will bring Andy's 
Gang to NBC TV starting Saturday, 
28 November (10:30-11 a.m. i as al- 
ternate week sponsor. 

Network radio notes: Two more 
additions to ABN"s new live music- 
variety programing are The Jim 
Backus Show, Monday through Fri- 
day 2-3 p.m., and The Jim Reeves 
Show, Monday through Friday 1-2 
p.m. Both are due to start 7 October 
. . . Mutual's Saturda) football sched- 
ule has been completeK sold out as 
Pharmacraft has signed for the five- 
minute pre-game and post-game shows. 
Pontiac and Pontiac dealers have al- 
readv bought the games themselves 
. . . Edison Electric Institute has 



f$L a S 


H 


Ji U4k w \ 






v J h 


V ll-\ ^** f "^ A 


~^>i 










Y**W 



" — such bliss! They both listen regu- 
larly to KRIZ Phoenix!" 




That measuring man from 
KWTV-OKLAHOMA CITY 

. . . measures the SALESpower 
of KWTVs 1572' tower for 
timebuyers on Madison Ave.! 




It's not square miles, but 
SALES THAT COUNT! 

In Madison, Wisconsin, VHF adds 
more to your cost than to your 
coverage. With WKOW-TV you 
deliver 70°o as much share of 
the audience* at only 45°o of 
the cost. 

*Madison area Telepulse— April, 
1957 




WKOW-TV 

ABC in Madison, Wis 



61 



-i 



'ONSOR • 14 SEPTEMBER l'Ai, 







•• ipPe 



Where Do 
Great Ideas Come From? 



From its beginnings this nation has been 
guided by great ideas. 

The men who hammered out the Constitution 
and the Bill of Rights were thinkers-men of 
vision— the best educated men of their day. 
And every major advance in our civilization 
since that time has come from minds < quippi d 
by education to create great ideas and put 
them into action. 

So. at the very core of our progress is the 
college classroom. It is there that the imagina- 
tion of young men and women gains the in- 
tellectual discipline that turns it to useful 
thinking. It is there that the great ideas of 
the future will be born. 

That is why the present tasks of our coll 
and universities are of vital concern to < y< ry 



American. These institutions are doing their 

utmost to raise their teaching standard 
meet the steadily rising i for enroll- 

ment, and provide the healthy educational 
climate in which great ideas may flourish. 

They need the help of all who love freedom, all 

who hope for continued i 1 

in statesmanship, in the better things of life. 

And thev need it no 



If you want to know what the college crisis 

means to you, write for a free , 

bookbt to: HIGHER EDUCA- ' -«-.. .<*,«,.<« 

TION, Box 36, Times Square 

Station, New York 36, N.Y. 




Sponsored as a public service, in cooperation uith the Council for Financial Aid -tion 



SPONSOR 



14 SEPTEMBER l ( )"i7 



69 



Rate Adjustment 

Effective 

Dec.1,1957 

See October Issue of Spot 
Radio SRDS for new rates 
adjusted to meet this 
RICH MARKET, a met- 
ropolitan population of 
268,000, 36% of which is 
Negro, receiving 43%* of 
every payroll dollar. 



I P A & L.S.U. 



Inst. Research 



kfi 



1050 kc - o - DAYTIME 

the OHLY ALL NEGRO PROGRAM Station in 

SHREVEPORT, LOUISIANA 



ROANOKE 

60 County Coverage 

VA. ) M 




ROANOKE 



M 

U \ 

M w / M 

POWER X . N. C. / HEIGHT 



/ U 

HEIC 

Television's Top Programs 




Ask Your "Colonel" at 
Peters, Griffin, Woodward, Inc. 



WDBJfr 



CHANNEL 

ROANOKE, VIRGINIA 



contracted for 5 five-minute segments 
on Monitor (NBC) to promote 
"Housepower Month." Kick-off on 
the promotion will start with a special 
25-minute show on Nightline on 17 
October (8:30-8:55 p.m.) . . . ABN 
added new and renewed business from 
four advertisers this week for its live 
music-variety daytime shows. Foster- 
Milhurn (through Street & Finney) 
signed for one segment a week on the 
new Herb "Oscar" Anderson Show. 
Other business went to the Don Mc- 
\cill Breakfast Club with the Kretsch- 
mer Corp. (thru George H. Hartman 
Co.) and Scholl Mfg. (through Dona- 
hue & duel as new sponsors and 
Sandura (through Hicks & Greist I re- 
newing . . . Mutual is now scheduling 
five music blocks for its between the 
new programing schedules. The music 
in 25-minute groupings will stress 
mood and easy listening patterns. The 
nation s top 50 tunes will now be lim- 
ited to the 3:05-7 p.m. period. 

Job notes: John Pearson has been 
named to the newly created position of 
station program executive in the 
ABN's expanded stations' department. 
Pearson was program consultant for 
the Katz Agency. Vice president in 
charge of the stations' department is 
Edward J. DeGray, former vice 
president in charge of station relations 
I now part of the stations' department I 
. . . Eugene Alnwick, formerly with 
Burke-Stuart. has joined Mutual as a 
sales account executive . . . Simon 

B. Siegel, treasurer, has been elected 
financial vice president of AB-PT . . . 
General Artists Corp. has named pres- 
idents for two more of its subsidiaries. 
Milton W. Krasny has been elected 
president of GAC-TV. Inc. and Arthur 

C. Weems president of General Artists 
Bureau. Other appointments within 
the GAC organization include: Harry 
Anger as vice president and general 
manager of GAC-TV and Buddy 
Howe as vice president and general 
manager of General Artists Bureau. 

REPS 

Peters, Griffin, Woodward, Inc., 
is adding new television account 
executives to its staff in Holly- 
wood and San Francisco, as well 
as expanding its office facilities in 
New York. 

Joseph L. Scanlan joins the PGW 
San Francisco office; from H-R Rep- 
resentatives. 



You're in 
good company 
on WGN-RADIO 
Chicago 







Top-drawer advertisers 
are buying WGN 

Join the nation's smartest 
time-buyers w ho select WGN 
for results! Consistent high 
program quality, at the lowest 
cost, makes \\ G.N a good buy 
— your smartest buy today in 
Chicagoland! 




Only ONE is atop the 

Continental Divide 

Serving both the Atlantic and 
Pacific Sides of America 

KXLF-TV4 -:- Montana 
Butte 

East— The Walker Co. 

West — Pacific Northwest Broadcasters 



70 



SPONSOR 



14 SEPTEMBER 1957 



Martin I. Connellj joins tin 
Hollywood staff; from KVSM, San 
Mateo. 

NBC K.idio Spot Sales hat ii|»- 

pointed Fred Lyons as manager, 
Eastern Radio Spot Sales, and 
Richard irbuckle a- Central Di« 
vision Sales Manager lor radio. 

I.\ ons was formerl) ( lentral I >i\ i 
won manager. 

\i Ixicklc who will make his bead- 
quarters in Chicago, was |in-\ ioush 
a radio salesman for Spol Sales. 

Ne%» appointments: McGavren 
Qninn Co. to rep K\\ DM. Des 
Moines . . . \\ alker Representation 

Co. gets WINK. Know HI,- . . . George 
P. BoDingbery Co. will handle 

\\-\l!!. New Orleans . . . 

FILM 

Sales on N«\* York syndicate row 
this week showed quite a flurry. 

Over )] million in sales were 
chalked up b) WC.s 2<> Men in less 
than eighl weeks after release. Na- 
tional advertisers include: Quaker 
Oats, V & P, Coca-Cola, Fritos, 
Carlings Red Cap. Budweiser and 
Brylcreem. Big regional buys were 
made by: Standard Oil of Texas. 
H. I'. Hood A Sons. Freihofer 
Baking Co.. Kroger, National Bo- 
hemian, Nick-L-Silver & Bumpt) 
Dumprj Stores. 

Cl!> T\ Film Sales bas sold \<m 
Log for telecasting in Saudi Arabia — 
the firm's fifth series bought h\ the 
Arabian-American Oil Company. The 
sale is of interesl because of Middle- 
East ten-ions. 

H I.W -T\ acquired the M-G-M Fea- 
ture film package which will be sched- 
uled across the hoard in a nighttime 
slot starting October . . . MGM fea- 
tures have now been sold in 61 of 
the nation's T\ markets. Latest sales 
include KSYD-TV, Wichita Falls: 
KMJ-TV, Fresno; KTTV, Colorado 
Springs; KHQ-TV, Spokane; \\ E XI!- 
TV. Pensacola; WMBR-TV, Jackson- 
wile . . . Guild Films has acquired 
world rights to approx. 1200 II K < > 
shorts i„ a deal with C. & C. T\ Corp. 

RJETY-Omaha, scheduled to start 
telecasting 17 September, has signed 

with V. X.P. for a number of groups 
of features from the Warner Bros, li- 
bran . . . KDKA-TV, Pittsburgh, has 
launched a giant campaign to promote 



the Warnei Bros, libra n acquired 
from \. \.l'. The films w ill debul in 
ala premiere with representatives 
From ovei >00 ad agem ies im i i « -• I to 
a spei id show ing al the Pittsbu 
Playhouse. 

People On the Movet I'hil < owan 

leaves bis post as •!■!•-• i f publii it) 

.it Screen < Jems to open hi^ ow n publii 
illation-. ,,iii, , \\ illiam II. Fine- 

shriber, Jr.. appointed to the newl) 

i reated post oi direct I intei na 

t ional operations .it S< reen < lems . . . 
Jack M. Stafford and Barrj W in- 
ton have joined the sales staff oi 
Famous Films Programs foi tele- 



vision, a division ol \ I \ Marvin 

Srhlaffer has been named 

i .il managei •>! thai lame divi* 

oi NIX 



TV STATIONS 

Idea al unrk : \X IIH > I X I ). ,.!..,, 

I .)-miiiiii<- tveeltl) publii service show 

/ lie l)m Ion I'ulii r StOf \ . 

Pari film and pari li\<-. thi -• 
show - tli-- Polii •• Department it 
li has gotten plaudits from othei neai 
h\ law enfon emenl offices. I he 1 1 
I Bl office has expressed interesl in 
Bending a film of the -how to XX ash- 
ii t"n i- .in example of good publii 






radio tempo 
reaches the "city on wheels." 

A program with music; 

news-while-it-happens; weather 

and freeway information. 

Los Angeles moves— at home and 

on the road — listening to 

KFWB...the station geared to the 

tempo of the times. 




r 



QUIfl!f su " mc, °IWVIB 




KFWB 




the personality station 



National Representatives: Branharr, Co.; McGavren-Quinn. San Francisco 
Robert M. Purcell, President and General Manager. 
5000 Watts day and night... clear regional channel. 



SPONSOR • 1 I SEPTEMBER 195' 



71 



FIRST TIME EVER! 




WULl with many firsts to 
its credit assures radio adver- 
tisers and agencies adequate 
separation for their commer- 
cials. This is not a new policy 
with WOLF. It is the proven sales formula that has brought 
in consistent renewals through the years from pleased clients 
representing top national advertisers. 

We never had it so good — why spoil it. 



RATING for RATING . . . 
RATE for RATE 
in CENTRAL NEW YORK it's - 



National Sales Representatives 
THE WALKER COMPANY 




SYRACUSE, N . Y 



relations in behalf of a cit\'s police 
department. 

Nielson .-hows the program as top- 
ping all opposition and pulling rat- 
ings as high as the most popular net- 
work shows. 

Promotion iilea: WJZ-TV, new 

\\ estinghouse station in Baltimore 
(formerl) WAAM) sent out $2.00 
tickets on an entn in special handicap 
race, the Oth at Timonium. Md.. named 
in honor of the new call letters. 

Here's another tv station design- 
ing programing for people "too 
busy to watch tv." 

WITI-1 \ . Milwaukee, will use hi-fi 
music hacked li\ visual gimmicks. The 
\ isual portion I in color and b&w) 
will include mobiles, artist sketching, 
puppets acting out songs and news. 
and similar eye-catching (not neces- 
sarily eye-holding I stunts. 

Tv applications: Between 24 August 
and 7 September three applications for 
new stations were filed and five new 
stations took to the air. 

Applications include: Fuhlix Tele- 
vision Corp., Miami Beach. Fla. for 
Channel 6, Miami. 100 kw visual, with 



You're in 
good company 
on WGN-RADIO 
Chicago 




Top-drawer advertisers 
are buying WGN 

Join the nation's smartesl 
time-buyers w ho -elect \^ (»N 
for results! Consistent high 
program quality, at the lowesl 
COSt, make- \\ GIN a good lui\ 
- your smartest buj todaj in 
Chicagoland! 



SPONSOR 



14 SEPTEMBER 1951 




you need the personal touch to sell in Milwaukee 



'Tis not only what you say . . . but how 
you say it in this business. That's why we 
insist that, when you send us live copy . . . 
our disc jockeys deliver a LIVE live 
announcement! It's an INTEGRATED 
commercial, too . . . as much a part of the 
show as Perry Como or Frank Sinatra . . . and 
it's the word of a fellow that Milwaukee 
listeners enjoy. Yes. by design on WEMP, 
your copy gets the interpretation necessary 
to effectively sell the market! 

WEMP 

5000 watt power at 1250 k.c. 




TT 



KEY ENT1 1 ION 

III' 

■ 
a day. mttr day 

■■ 

■ 
Foolhall: tptrial tport< 

■ ■ 

lit 6-man WEMP *<<rt drparlmrnt 
IP tporU 
trirr. .* moltilt 

■ 
■ 
lar daily leltphont ec I 



- you lit* bp HrarlUy-Ri- 1 

« 



M'ONSOR 



] I SEPTEMBER L951 



73 




Strong Local plus 
Top CBS Shows make 

|\^ V ^^ 5 '°°° w ° tts radi ° 

MISSOULA, Montana 





the preferred 


radio 




station. 




\ 


/ affiliated with 






SELLING 


/| 191,000 watts 


WESTERN 
MONTANA 




I KMSO-tv 

J TRANSMITTER 


Mosby's, 
Inc. 




| 100 MILE RADIUS 






J] ATOP 






41 TELEVISION 


Your 




MOUNTAIN 


BEST 




41 ELEVATION 


buy in 




:= |1 7000 FT. 


Montana. 




,3g; "^ \ 




^E 


■ ^ZUk "jj'v. — --•**. 




MISSOULA, MONTANA 



tower 1090 feet above average terrain, 
plant $1,175,165, yearly operating 
cost §730.000: Suncoast Cities Broad- 
casting, St. Petersburg, Fla., for Chan- 
nel 10, St. Petersburg, 316 kw visual, 
with tower 1005 feet above average 
terrain, plant $1,459,654, \ early op- 
erating cost $825,577; and Illiana 
Telecasting Corp., Terre Haute, for 
Channel 2, Terre Haute, 100 kw vis- 
ual, with tower 970 feet above average 
terrain, plant $458,849, yearly operat- 
ing cost $600,000. 

New stations on the air were: WIIC, 
Pittsburgh, Channel 11, NBC TV affil- 
iation; WAVY-TV, Portsmouth, Va.. 
Channel 10, ABC TV affiliation; 
KSPR-TV, Casper. Wye-., Channel 6, 
CBS TV affiliation; WFGA-TV, Jack- 
sonville, Fla., Channel 12, NBC TV 
affiliation; and WWL-TV, New Or- 
leans, Channel 4. 

Station notes: KERO-TV, Bakers- 
field, Calif, sale to Wrather-Alvaraze 
Broadcasting has been finalized. Pur- 
chase price was $2,150,000 . . . 
WCDA, Albany - Troy - Schenectady, 
UHF (Channel 41) has been author- 
ized to switch to VHF (Channel 10) 
around 1 December. This will make 
the station a VHF'er with a UHF sat- 
ellite, Channel 19 in Mt. Greylock. 

Color notes: WFBM-TV, Indian- 
apolis, is now scheduling remote color- 
casts. The station has been carry- 
ing from 11 to 16 hours of color per 
week both network and local for the 
past two years . . . The first color tv 
station outside of the U.S. will 
debut 24 October in Havana. Cuba. 
This is Canal 12, S. A. 

People in the news: Robert O. 
Runnerstrom, vice president of 
WMBD, Inc., Peoria, has been ap- 
pointed director of television and 
Robert M. Riley, Jr. formerlv na- 
tional radio sales manager has been 
named television sales manager for the 
firm . . . Bill Fox has been promoted 
to the post of station manager of 
KFMB-TV, San Diego . . . Mrs. Phyl 
Swan, formerly with KAKE-TV, 
Wichita, has been named promotion 
director of KFEQ-TV, St. Joseph, Mo. 
. . . Lawrenee Eisenberg has left 
WABD, New York, to join WABC&- 
WABC-TV, New York as director of 
public relations . . . Bill Dean, former 
staff announcer for WWL Radio, 
New Orleans, has switched over to 
WWL-TV as production supervisor. 




ON THE RICH 

Amorillo, Capital of the Golden 
Spread, is growing and pro- 
gressing with the best of the 
metropolitan markets in the 
great Southwest. Its population 
has increased over 76 % since 
1950. 

• Effective buying income 

$254,444,000. 

• Annual wages per family 

$6,541. 

• Military payroll $24,000,000 

annually including military 
and civilian employees. 
Get in on the Big Buy on Big 4, 
Amorillo's specialized television 
station. 

CONTACT ANY KATZ MAN 

KGNC-TV 

Channel 4 

AMARILLO, TEXAS 



74 



SPONSOR 



14 SEPTEMBER 1957 




Our drive can putt you in the chips 



History was made adding still another first for 
WHIO-TV— on the station coverage of the PGA 
Golf Tournament held in July. On the last two days 
of the tournament we had our cameras on the full 
action of the last 10 holes at Miami Valley Golf Club, 
giving shot-by-shot coverage of each match. Compli- 
mentary letters from all over our area attest to our 
great job. And we did it WITH FIVE CAMERAS. 
Our point is, the average station wouldn't attempt 
a match-play tournament. But THIS station has 



been above average since 1949 and has built up a 
pool of physical and more important human 
sources for effective operation. They're loaded with 
the creative ability to handle any kind of i pro- 
gram you mention. It i- this same creative pro 
gramming that has built a great audience loyalty, 
consistent month after month after month.* 

Our Nation. ll ( Jaddy, ( leorge P Eiollingbery, is iu-t 

a 9-iron -hot from you A-k him for market and i i 
erage feature.- and he'll .-how you why we're 1 IKS I 



*WHI0-TV— June PULSE Ratings 
13 out of top 15 once-a-week shows 
7 out of top 10 multi-weekly shows 
June ARB Rating — 7 out of top 10 shows 



CHANNEL 



DAYTON, OHIO 



whio-tv 



I 



i 



One of America's 
great area stations 



m 



WKLO 

LOUISVILLE T^T 




HERE 



ENTUCKIANA 



LOUISVILLE'S 

Best 

AIR 

SALESMEN 



® 



ISTENS 




FOR RESULTS 



N 1080 KC 

Programs and People 
That Produce 



JACK BENDT 

DAVE BROCKMAN 
GINGER CALLAHAN 
PAUL COWLEY 
TOMMIE DOWNS 



JOHN FRAIM 

WILSON HATCHER 
BOB HENRY 
RED KIRK 

JIMMIE LOGSDON 



Represented by John Blair & Company 



RADIO STATIONS 

Nine out of 10 football fans* turn 
to radio to follow their local teams 
gays KAB research based on Pulse 
studies. 

In a 16-page brochure called. "Be 
a Big Winner in the Fourth Quarter. 
Sponsor Football on Radio." I! \li 
lists these advantages: 

• Large and loyal audiences can be 
reached repeatedly. 

• I lie nature of the program allows 
repetitive sales messages. 

• Can accommodate a variety of 
budgets. 

• A wide and versatile range of 
merchandising is possible. 

The report also shows that football 
is the most broadcast of all sporting 
events with 'JO.!!' , of its radio cover- 
age sponsored. 



New group-rate combinations: 

A-BUY in California which incluudes 
KGEE, Bakersfield: KXOC, Chi.-: 
KARM, Fresno. KIDD. Monterex - 
Salinas; KVIP. Redding: KROY. Sac- 
ramento; KITO. San Bernardino. 
XEAC. San Diego: KIST. Santa Bar- 
bara and KST\. Stockton. George P. 
Hollingbery is national rep for A- 
BUY . . . Texas Triangle which in- 
cludes KLIF ■ KFJZ. Dallas - Fort 

Houston and KT^ \. 

ohn Blair Co. is the 



Worth: KILT. 

San Antonio, 
national rep. 



Station notes: WITT. Lewisburg, 

Pa., first radio station in the town 
since 1933 went on the air this week 
. . . WSM, Nashville, has signed as an 
affiliate of ABX . . . KQ\, Pittsburgh, 
has been bought b\ AB-PT . . . KGW. 
Portland. Ore., has gone over to 24- 
hour around-the-clock operation . . . 
K-ACE, Riverside-San Bernardino, 
Calif., has applied for permission to 
build a new FM station for that 
area . . . 

Anniversaries: KNX. Los Angeles, 
celebrating it- 37th. this week . . . 
KD\L, Salt Lake City is marking its 
25th. \ear as an NBC affiliate. 

Personnel notes: William J. Con- 

ran moves over from promotion man- 
ager of \\ PFH-TA . W ilmington, to 
promotion manager at \\ [BG, Phila- 
delphia . . . Jim Sondheim has been 






76 



-I'ONSOIJ 



14 SEPTEMBER 195*3 



The only Buf f alo 
OLcLLlOIl that can pass the 



w 



Thru way Test" 




* ■ u 



Lake Ontario 



I OUIANS I 
NIAGAtA | • °^ , 

Sl C«*w«>«i o fl*»ewa Fife _ J _ r 

XtofmWb' 



Rochester 



uffalo v 







°aix. I c«mo I 
JoArwd. V C 






fU* 



fO«>* 



cattaiaugus 
urn* v*». r 



WGR 



ouo ' 



AiUGANT J*- • v sowna K u ' J 

IXWYORK r' 



I PENNSYLVANIA I 



nMufvJa 
OlAWFOtO 



r-4r-t 



SmXtlpert I 
OMl J«w«i j 

-Km 



Coudwipert | 



»___ — ____' 



I VfNANGO "L.J* 
-J- 



!<*a-'X 






camhon"T~ ' 



SUUVAN l 

1 



COMING EAST to the New York State 
Thruway, you pick up WGR RADIO loud 
and clear, way out in Ohio. 

GOING WEST on the New York State 
Thruway, you pick up WGR RADIO loud 
and clear, just past Syracuse. 

IF YOU WANT maximum coverage in the 
S3. 000. 000. 000. 00 Western New York 
Market, (plus big bonus audience in 
Canada) . . . buy WGR RADIO! 

ABC AFFILIATE 

NATIONAL REPS: Peters. Griffin. Woodward, Inc. 



BUY 




RADIO 

"Buffalo's First Station 



SPONSOR 



1 I SEPTEMBER 1 ' ' ^ " 



You're in 
good company 
on WGN-RADIO 
Chicago 




Top-drawer advertisers 
are buying WGN 

Join the nation's smartest 
time-buyers who select WGN 
for results! Consistent high 
program quality, at the lowest 
COSt, make- \\ (JN a good buy 
— your smartest buy today in 
Chicagoland! 





Most Powerful Twins 

CJON-TV ^ 




ILL* 300.000 



' 'Captive Newfoundlanders 
and latest B B M &kows , 
85% of all qreater St. Johns 
homes have T V Sets 



weeo i, co. U.S. 



STOVIH-CANAOA 



u|i|H'd from account executive to na- 
tional sales manager for WAAT, 
Newark . . . Edward M. Guss has 
been transferred from vice president 
and station manager of KOSI, Denver, 
to a similar position with WGVM, 
Greenville, Miss. . . . John F. Box, 
Jr., executive v. p. of the Bartell 
Group, has been named general man- 
ager of WILD, Boston . . . Herbert S. 
Dolgoff has been named to the neul\ 
created post of General Counsel for 
Storz stations . . . Fred M. Vosse has 
joined the sales staff of WIND, 
Chicago. Vosse comes from R. P. 
Scott, Inc. . . . Roger Hoffman, 
former commercial manager for 
KLIN, Lincoln, Nebr., has been ap- 
pointed resident manager for WQUB, 
Galesburg, 111. The new station is due 
to take to the air this week . . . Wal- 
ter A. Schwartz has been named 
local sales manager for WWJ. Detroit. 



CANADA 

General Mills (Canada) Ltd. has 
introduced an all-new look in the 
packaging of its five ready-to-eat 
breakfast cereals. Television and 
radio advertising will help spear- 
head the campaign. 

"Family look" packaging uses the 
Betty Crocker name and bright red 
spoon design as an eye-catcher. This 
is already an established trademark in 
the Canadian market. But the break- 
fast cereals ( Jets. Trix. Wheaties, 
Cheerios, and Corn Kix) with Ameri- 
can packaging were relatively unfa- 
miliar to the Canadian market. 

Together with its agency, E. W. 
Reynolds Ltd., General Mills is aiming 
at easy brand identification. 

The annual ACRTF convention 
(Association Canadienne de la 
Radio et de la Television de 
langue francaise) will be held next 
week, 15-18 September, at the 
Alpine Inn, Ste. Marguerite, Que- 
bec. 

This is the fourth annual meeting 
of the association which is affiliated 
with the Canadian Association of 
Radio and Television Broadcasters. 
Some 40 French-language radio and 
t\ stations will be represented together 
with a cross-section of Canadian (and 
American) businessmen; attendance 
of more than 200 is expected. 

In addition to the regular French- 




KOA-Radio can fit perfectly into 
any advertising plan, large or 
small. In fact, it's the only radio 
station — outfitted in every way — 
to sell the entire Western Market. 

PROGRAMMING — has been skill- 
fully tailored by KOA-Radio 
since 1925. It programs popu- 
lar local and regional shows 
to fit and please the tastes of 
4,000,000 Westerners. 

ALTERATIONS — are unnecessary 
when you buy KOA-Radio. 
Your sales message told by 
KOA ... is sold by KOA 
throughout the rich Western 
Market! 



Represented 
by 

Henry I. 
Christal 
Co., Inc. 



KO 

DENVER 




One of America's g reat radio stations 
850 Kc 50,000 WATTS 



How Hietf 
is UP?} 



CO." (Xwcc'tvllt' 



A&ove SEA 
LEVEL, 1,010 
FEET ABOVE 
AVERAGE TER- 
RAIN, MAN, 
THATS OUR 
NEW TOWER 

GO\r\6 UP, 

this means 
more tv for 
More people 

IN THE 

TRl - STATE 

AREA 




"WPSM-TY 

NBC* ABC Channel 6 

DVLVTH- SUPERIOR 

National Representatives 
PETERS, GRIFFIN, WOODWARD 



SPONSOR 



14 SEPTEMBER 1957 



DETR 

both built by. 



WWJ-TV 





UiLLnra 




Milium 
Uiiii 




Moyor Albert E 
Cobo. ".port plug " 
Of 'Odoy '§ Detroit. 



>IBK|||„ 
■ III 

Milium. 

IliiinniK 



■ niiiH'"" ^ ■ 

■■" . Bl ||M "IMIll 

-■■■I* 1 ' .1 M »A* 



sfir 



> 



Always dynamic Detroit is busier than ever. Great new 
buildings are rising. Extensive expressways, shopping centers 
and other vast projects are under way. All provide graphic 
evidence of the unlimited faith Detroiters have in 
their citv. 



Faith in WWJ-TV is another notable Detroit char- 
acteristic—faith engendered by WWJ-TV's acknowl- 
edged leadership and emphasis on quality in 
every phase of television. 

That's why seeing is believing to the great 
WWJ-TV audience — a priceless advantage 
to every advertiser. 




The beouttful City-County Building in Detroit's new C'*'C 
Neorby ore (he Veterani Memoriol Building, the Henry and 
Ed»el Ford Auditorium, ond the huge Eihibitt Building — Conven- 
tion Hall, under construction. 




ASSOC'ATf AMFM STATION WWJ 
^^" - -ed & operated by The Oe*- 

~~ Wood«*o'd Inc 



SPON-nK 



14 SEPTEMBER I95'i 






ARE YOU BUYING 5 
AND GETTING ONLY 4? 




Approximately ONE-FIFTH of Phoenix-area pop- 
ulation is Spanish-speaking. It YOU have been 
buying Phoenix radio time tor what you thought 
was total coverage, using English stations only 
(overlooking Spanish-language KIFNl you have 
been buying FIVE and getting only FOUR' 
KIFN represents ONE OUT OF EVERY FIVE con- 
sumers in this area. To reach the ONE you've 
been missing — the ONE that speaks Spanish — 

SELL IN SPANISH 
over KIFN 

— Central Arizona's ONLY full-time Spanish- 
language station! We translate your sales-mes- 
sage FREE. Production spots available. 



NATIONAL TIME SALES 

New York City 

and 

Chicago 



HARLAN C. OAKES 
San Francisco 
San Antonio 
Los Angeles 



amr 



860 Kilocycles • 1000 Wafts 
REACHING PHOENIX AND 
ALL OF CENTRAL ARIZONA 




Canada t\ radio advertising businesses 
id l>c discussed, this year's convention 
will have an Agency Da\ <>n 17 Sep- 
tember. Delegates from leading ad- 
vertising agencies will lead discussions 
with station managers and personnel. 

The Bureau of Broadcast Measure- 
men! held a special meeting last week. 
10 September, in Toronto. Purpose: 
to draw from the broadcasting-adver- 
tising industry questions and com- 
ments on BBM policies and plans. 

In the field of closed-circuit TV, 
Teleprompter of Canada's rapidly 
expanding Group Communica- 
tions Division Mill benefit from 
the recent purchase of 10 new 
large screen tv projectors. Spence 
Caldwell, president of Teleprompter. 
says that 1958 will see his firm's closed 
circuit tv in operation from coast to 
coast. 

Around the stations: Winner of 
British Columbia Electric's "Dealer 
Sales Award of the Month" used a 
heavy spot radio campaign on CKNW 
I New Westminster, British Columbia l . 
The dealer. George White, of House- 
hold Appliances, launched his '"Gaso- 
rama" promotion with 30 radio spots 
per day, bringing results of 49 gas 
unit sales in one week. 

FINANCIAL 

Stock market quotations: Follow- 
ing stocks in air media and related 
fields are listed each issue with quota- 
tions for Tuesday this week and Tues- 
day the week before. Quotations sup- 
plied by Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner 
and Beane. 

Tues. Tues. 



Stock 


3 Sept. 


10 Sept. 


Change 


New York Stork 


Exchange 




AB-PT 


18% 


17% 


— 78 


\.T&T 


174% 


L70% 


-3% 


Avco 


6% 


6% 


- '•.• 


CBS "A" 


29% 


28 T s 


- ',• 


Columbia Pic 


L8% 


L8% 




1 .IM'H '- 


I6 :I , 


14% 


-1% 


Paramount 


34% 


33% 


-1% 


RCA 


33% 


33% 




Storer 


24% 


2V t 


— % 


20th Fox 


26 :! s 


-'V', 


— % 


Warner Bros. 


22% 


21 


-1% 


Westinjrhoiise 


63% 


61% 


-2% 


American Stock 


Exchange 




Vllied Vrtists 


:; :: s 


3% 




Assoc. Art. Prod. ( > : '» 


9% 


— ' ., 


C&C Super 


L3/16 


% 


-1 16 


Diimont 1 .alis. 


1% 


P. 


'. 


Guild Films 


.; ;: , 


3% 




\T\ 


7 7 s 


7% 


- ', 



You're in 
good company 
on WGN-RADIO 
Chicago 




Top-drawer advertisers 
are buying WGN 

Join the nation's smartest 
time-buyers who select WGN 
for results! Consistent high 
program quality, at the lowest 
cost, makes WGN a good buy 
—your smartest buy today in 
Chicagoland! 





PRODUCTS FOR YOUR 
j TV AND ART DEPT. 

"STORYBOARD" PAD 

The pad that has big 5x7 
video panels that enable 
you to make man-sized TV 
visuals. Perforated video 
and audio segments on gray 
background. 

No. 72C— Pad Size 14x17" 2.50 

(50 Sheets — 4 Segments on Sheet) 

No. 72 E— Pocket Size 6% x 8Va" 

(50 Sheets — 1 Segment on Sheet) 



Tomkins TELEPAD 

Most popular TV visual pod 
with J 1 .j-i" video and 
audio panels on gray bock- 
ground. Each panel perfo- 
rated 



No. 72A— 19x24" 

(50 Sheets — 12 panels on Sheet) 
No. 72B— Pocket Size 8x18" 2.00 

(75 Sheets — 4 panels on Sheet) 




VIDEO PAPER 



Sensational new paper for 
TV artists. Makes an ordin- 
ary pencil line vivid and 
colors just popl Write for 
sample. 

FREE SAMPLES 
FOR THE ASKING! 
Write on your letterhead 
200-page catalog of art 
plies. "An Encyclopedia 
Artists Materials" 





80 



SPONSOR 



14 SEPTEMBER 1957 



• ONE OF A SERIES 




It couldn't happen to nicer guys .... 

.... than WAVZ advertisers. 



Nothing gives us greater satisfaction than to 
see WAVZ advertisers selling out. That's why 
we work so hard to assure their results. 



PWAVZ 



Representatives: 



National: Holiingbery Co. 
New England: Kettell-Carter 





'00 \ 

152 TEMPLE STREET, NEW HAVEN, CONN. 

Den. el VV. Kops, Executive Vice President and General Manager • Richard J Monahan, Vice Presi~.nl and Commercial Mnnar-r 



SPONSOR • 1 4 SEPTEMBER I'm, 







coverage 



If you want radio coverage in New Jersey — we're the boy with the pail. 
WVNJ delivers more listeners than any other radio station 
broadcasting from New Jersey. Almost twice as many 
as the next 2 stations combined.* 

*Source - Hooper - Jan. Feb. 
WVNJ delivers this audience for less money than any radio station 
in either New York or New Jersey. No other metropolitan 
station comes anywhere near it. 

(31c per 1000 homes) 
WVNJ is your safest advertising buy because not only 
does it have superb programming (it plays only Great Albums 
of Music from sign on to sign off) but it backs that programming 
with the heaviest promotional schedule of any independent 
radio station in America. 
Check its impressive list of national and local advertisers. 
There's no better proof of a station's power to produce. 




WVNJ 



Represented by: 
Broadcast Times Sales 
New York OX 7-1696 



Newark, New Jersey 

RADIO STATION OF ZUt Kctuark #cttig 



32 



SPONSOR • 14 SEPTEMBER 1957 



If hut' \ happening in I s Government 
ihut ii/j, it* tponson, agencies, itationt 



WASHINGTON WEEK 



14 SEPTEMBER 

Copyright I9S7 
SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC 



Capitol Hill i- flexing it- muscles for another poke at the l< < . 

Behind this one will be the Senate Small Business daytime radio subcommittee* 

\ report, due this week, will charge dilator; tactic- ami lack of concern I imall 
radio stations. 

rhe subcommittee held meetings about the middle "f the last < 
I In- daytimers complained the) had asked foi extended hours of operation I 
and to dale had received nothing but blank attention. 

Rejoined l'< witnesses before the committee I In- daytimers were luck) their 
petition hadn't been dismissed outright, because no engineering evidence was sub- 
mitted with it. Clear channel stations charged the daytimers 1 proposal would i net 
loss of sen ice to the public. 

The subcommittee's report i- said nol to take Bides in the dispute 
stating that the FC( has been remiss in its duti in nol coming to an) decision at all. 



The first word from the FCC in man; months on its Former ambitious plans 
to rescue 1'IIF television came this week. 

In essence, that word was a charge b> an F< C commissioner thai his colleagues 
had abandoned FHF. 

Commissioner Robert T. Hartley wrapped his cl round his dissi i de- 

cision b) the I ( '(' to i I ' keep channel 6 in Schenectad) for GE's WRGB-TV, 
channels 10 and 13 to the Mbany-Schenectad) area Hie move also would involve substi- 
tuting channel 2 for 1 3 in I lii a. 

Hartley held that the area should be made all-l III inalh i 

he added: I lie decision "establishes a milesl me along a road which levi- 

sion search) a road from which, I fear, there m&\ be no tut 



The FCC also proposed this week t«» add ■ third * III' channel in Provide™ . 

The move would mean switching channel 12 from Providence to Ne* linen 
and Portland. Me., and relieving those cities of channel- f> and 12 respectively. 

Stations nov operating on those channels would have to shift, but no great outcry 
is expected because all VHF*8 will remain VHF. Written arguments on tlii- pro- 
posal are due at the commission 1<> October, 

\ strong advocate of the shuffle is R.I. Senator John < >. Paatore, i i of the 

Senate Commerce communications subcommittee. 



\. Congress was adjourning, Senator Carl T. < urtis (R., Neb.) Iced <><T on the 
Senate floor at wired l\ . holding thai it should be subject to regulation. 

The Senator"- speech covered thes is: 

• lit- warned the Fl < not to authorize the system without < ongressional author- 
ization. 

• He disputed the Ft ( assertion it has no power to authorize subscription tv. 

• He noted that if the FCC lacked jurisdiction over pa) t\ vi - Congressional 
hearings should be held to get the matter straight. Vlso on 

should be permitted to engage in wired tv. 

Meanwhile, the results of experiments in cable t\. which started last week in Bartles- 
ville, Okla., arc being awaited in the Capital with many-sided inti 



SPONSOR 



1 1 SEPTEMBER L957 






Hitch your wagon to these stars! 

There's been a big change in Baltimore! Channel 13 (formerly WAAM) now is WJZ-TV. 
And it's the newest, brightest star in the television skies! 

Big things are happening at WJZ-TV! Exciting new shows, great local personalities, the 
first Baltimore release of hundreds of great MGM and RKO feature films! 

The result! Baltimore's changing its viewing habits . . . tuning to Channel 13 for exciting, 
star*studded entertainment! 

Are you with it? Now's the time to hitch your wagon to these selling stars on WJZ 13 TV. 

For star*bright availabilities, call Joe Dougherty, WJZ-TV Sales Manager (MOhawk 4-7600, 
Baltimore), or the man from Blair-TV. 




Now Baltimore can see two of its top broadcasting personalities 
have been signed to exclusive contracts with WJZ-TV. 



Jack Wells and Buddy Deane 



In the morning . . . 

^BALTIMORE 

CLOSE-UP" 

starring Jack Wells 

From 7 to 9:30 A.M., Monday through 
Friday, Jack Wells' "Close*Up" focuses 
on weather, news, time signals, traffic re- 
ports, music, interviews with local and 
visiting celebrities, and cartoons for the 
youngsters. 



In the afternoon . . . 

"THE BUDDY DEAN 
BANDSTAND" 

3 to 5 P.M., Monday through Friday, the latest 
and most popular recorded music. Teenage 
dance parties, guest stars, dance contests, 
quiz contests! 




NEVER BEFORE has Baltimore had such an opportunity to see Hollywood's 
greatest stars in their greatest films! Magnificent MGM and RKO releases 
are attracting audiences all day long, every day of the week on THE EARLY 
SHOW, THE LATE SHOW, BALTIMORE MOVIETIME, SATURDAY 
MOVIE-GO-ROUND, ANDY HARDY THEATRE, MGM ALL-STAR 
THEATRE, POPEYE AND HIS PALS. 




* 



u 



FIRST RATINGS AVAILABLE! 

Sets-in-Use Doubled! WJZ-TV Ratings Tripled! 

c Mill Telephone Coincidental — Hon., Sept. 9. 1957) 



3:00-5:00 PM 

Now 

I In- Huildy Deane Bandstand WJZ-TV 11.1 

Station A 7.1 

"-t.iii.iii It 7.1 

Sets-ln-Use 25.6 



Aug. '57 

(M-F Av.) 

3.2 

4.3 

5.2 

12.8 



6:00-7:30 PM 

Now 

The Earl? Show — WJZ-TV 14.9 

Station A 16.0 

Station B 7.6 

Sets-in-Use 39.4 






Aug. '57 
(M-F At.) 

5.2 

8.6 

4.2 

18.4 








YOUR STAR 'BRIGHT STATION 




BALTIMORE, MARYLAND 



represented by Blair -TV 



WESTINGHOUSE 
BROADCASTING 
COMPANY, INC. 




8AOIO 

BOSTON, '.VBZ+WBZA 
PITTSBURGH, KDKA 
CLEVELAND. KYW 
FORT WAYNE, WOWO 
CHICAGO, WIND 
PORTLAND, KEX 
TEIEVISION 

BOSTON, WBZ-lv 

BALTIMORE. wjZ TV 

PITTSBURGH, kOka tv 

CLEVELAND. KYW-TV 

SAN FRANCISCO. Kdx 

WIND represented by AM Rod'O Soles 

WJZ TV represented by &n 

KPIX represented by The Kon Ager 

All other WBC stations tepresented by 

Peters. Grift 1 . n, Woodword. Inc 








A round-up of trade talk, 
trends and tips for admen 



SPONSOR HEARS 



14 SEPTEMBER Paul Roberts, Mutual 's new president, tells the trade that he's shouting for 

Copyright 1957 ., g£ m j]li on „ rog9 j„ time billings. 

9P0NS0R PUBLICATIONS INC. 

The network, he say?, is now going at the rate of $3} \ million a year. It needs 
about S4 million to break even. 

After main months of wrangling. NBC this week wrote off a S100.000 short- 
rate elaim against Revlon. 

The Revsons appreciated the windfall from Bob Kintner. But what amazed them was 
this: The gesture came after they had done all their network buying for the 
season. 

The publicity director for a syndicator was forced to resign this week because 
of the following common oversight: 

He got himself into the columns more than a certain minor company official. 

If you have had any doubts about the acceptability of vermouth advertising, 
The NARTB's Tv Code Review Board has this to sa\ : 

"Although vermouth is a wine rather than a 'hard liquor.' copy which suggests its 
merits as a cocktail ingredient should be avoided. 

"Vermouth advertising, naturallv. also is subject to the interpretation which pre- 
cludes consumption of an alcoholic beverage in tv commercials." 

A few weeks ago SPONSOR HEARS reported the unique fact that Campbell-Ewald 
and D. P. Brother share a reception room, although they are entirely separate agen- 
cies (24 August, page 114). 

This week a Detroit agency man comments that the two agencies may well share 
the same physical space due to a common ancestry, but that there are some note- 
worthy differences: 

"The Campbell-Ewald side," savs he, "is furnished in contemporary blond 
furniture, with receptionists to match, while the D. P. Brother area is in rich wal- 
nut and traditional leather chairs." 

You'll be hearing the euphemism "program contribution" more and more 
in the coming weeks lit means that the network is '"contributing" something to a spon- 
sored program without charging for it). Here"? why: 

1 1 Insiders expect it to become a polite way for advertisers and networks to 
get around rate adjustments. 

2) It's easier for a network to absorb part of a show"? cost than to applx a special 
set of discounts. 

Note: The "program contributions" on at least two shows making their debuts 
this fall run over 50% of their list prices. 

Anecdotes can be thoroughly discounted, but that doesn't stop them from popping 
up during Madison Avenue luncheon talk main years later. 

You still hear the one about a soap company president ordering his big eve- 
ning dramatic show switched to CBS because he found only Ivory in NBC wash- 
rooms. 

86 SPONSOR • 14 SEPTEMBER 1957 




A GIANT CAT WALK 

FOR CHICAGO'S LOOP 



L 



\ giant cat walk 

between the Wrigley 

Building and the 

Prudential Building 

would be mighty 

convenient for Chicago 

agency folks . . . 

especially to the Top Of 

The Rock at 1:00 P.M. 

^ e've measured the gap and 

our giant tower (over 

Vi mile) will fit . . . with 

a little left over! 

ggestion: Try measuring 

the giant SALESpower 

of our 1572' tower 

in Oklahoma. 



u 



WrigJey 8 
Meyerhoff 
Thompson 



uilding, Offices 
& Company, 
Company. 



of — Arthur 
J. Walter 





PRUDENTIAL 

A 



_xL 



rnifir 



Prudential Building, Offices of — Leo Burnett Company, 
Inc., Calkins & Holden, Inc., D'Arcy Advertising Company. 
Needham, Louis end BVorby, Inc. 



KWTV 




OKLAHOMA 



CITY 



SPONSOR • 14 SEPTEMBER 195' 



87 



WHICH TV STATION 



SOUTH BEND? 



THE SOUTH BEND-ELKHART TELEVISION AUDIENCE 



RANK 


PROGRAM 


WSBT-TV 


STATION "A" 


STATION "B" 


1. 


1 Love Lucy 


57.5 






2. 


I've Got A Secret 


44.5 






3. 


Red Skelton Show 


43.1 






4. 


Perry Como Show 




43.0 




5. 


G. E. Theatre 


41.7 






6. 


Hitchcock Presents 


40.9 






7. 


Playhouse 90 


40.5 






8. 


December Bride 


39.6 






9. 


Gunsmoke 


39.0 






10. 


$64,000 Question 


39.0 






11. 


Climax 


36.9 






12. 


Lassie 


36.4 






13. 


The Millionaire 


35.2 






14. 


Brave Eagle 


33.5 






15. 


Zane Grey Theatre 


32.5 






16. 


Your Hit Parade 




32.5 




17. 


Jack Benny 


31.7 






18. 


Ed Sullivan 


31.4 






19. 


The Lineup 


30.3 






20. 


Loretta Young 




29.7 




21. 


Burns and Allen 


29.5 






22. 


Bob Cummings 


29.1 






23. 


People Are Funny 




28.9 




24. 


What's My Line 


28.5 






25. 


To Tell The Truth 


28.5 








Latest ARB Rating — 


April 21 


thru April 27 





WSBT-TV carries 14 of the top 15 television shows in the South 
Bend market; 21 of the top 25; 37 of the top 50! One audience 
study after another proves that WSBT-TV dominates the South 
Bend television picture. You just don't cover South Bend unless 
you use it. Write for detailed market data. 

PAUL H. RAYMER CO., INC., NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES 



TV 



SOUTH 

BEND, 

IND. 

CHANNEL 



NATIONAL PAINT 

{Continued from page 39) 

this to "durability" as the most wanted 
paint quality . 

For the dealer, the campaign was to 
create store traffic, minimize sales ef- 
fort and increase the value of the Na- 
tional paint line through greater sales. 
The high degree of dealer cooperation 
achieved is in large measure due to the 
careful study of the paint retailer's 
problems. 

The seasonal slump with resulting 
lack of competitive advertising activ- 
ity gave National maximum impact for 
their television dollar; and the agen- 
cy's analysis of competitive advertising 
showed how National's copy might 
again capitalize on an industry weak- 
ness. 

Tikis & Cantz found in the competi- 
tion, "insufficient evidence of distinct 
product advantages." Most paint ads 
were similar to the point of confusion. 
Consumer appeals were completely 
standard and seemed to miss original- 
ity in translating basic product selling 
points to the consumer. 

The agency's job was to make Na- 
tional Paint stand out on the basis of 
product features which were suscepti- 
ble to demonstration both for dealer 
and consumer. 

The agency also reasoned that the 
clients" advertising should be substan- 
tially different from ordinary paint 
advertising. A basic theme had to be 
established based on the single prod- 
uct advantage most meaningful to the 
consumer. This quality turned out to 
be "durability." Research indicated a 
strong consumer preference for a long- 
lasting paint. At best painting is not 
an easy job. and so National Paint was 
intent on proving that its product 
"could take the normal abuses of the 
average home:" that dirt, smears and 
smudges could easily be removed from 
the painted surface without fading the 
color. 

After repeated conferences with Na- 
tional Paints chemists, the agency de- 
cided to identify the product advantage 
in a ke\ phrase. The "new Color-Lok 
process was chosen. The advertising 
theme Incused attention on National 
Paint durability. Copy assured that. 
"Color-Lok in National Paint comes to 
the top of the painted surface and 
forms an invisible seal that keeps color 
permanent . . . won't fade, chip or 



::;; 



SPONSOR 



14 SEPTEMBER 1957 



& 



19 i r > *C 



l* 



~*n 



l 

t 



Jt 




^j 







V. 




pa's resting On his laurels! There ain't nothin'etae 

to rest on yet. But jes'you wait. Ma's been tuned to KXLA and she's gettin' 
notions about beddin'down the brood in modern contraptions. 
Whether it's beddin', eatin', or what-nots, you'll sell millions of these folks with 
KXLA, most listened to 24-hour country and western music station. 

10,000 watts covering the greater Los Angeles market 




1110 on the dial 



represented nationally by Burke-Stuart Co., New York, Chicago, Detroit, Los Angeles, San Francisco 






~~:rinigr" r 

/JHUo Nil 



jK)fe agoxv^, 




Buy Channe 



See Your Katz Representative TO DA Y 




NEW ORLEANS 



IN THE 
CRESCENT CITY 



peel. A new kind of insurance for 
painted walls." 

In addition to increased consumer 
sales, the campaign made an amazing 
impression upon paint dealers in the 
area. A follow-up survey by Tilds & 
Cantz to determine dealer awareness of 
the National brand name and "color- 
Lok process" was conducted immedi- 
ately after the campaign. 

A questionnaire was mailed to 385 
retailers, including franchised and 
prospective dealers. The 49 returned 
(13%), tabulated this way. 

To the question, "Are you familiar 
with the brand name National 
Paints?," 94% yes, 11% no. Of those 
replying "yes," 59% said they had 
seen the product on television (18% 
claimed to have seen it in the news- 
papers, although no newspaper adver- 
tising was used ) . 

Some 68% of the responding paint 
dealers knew of the chief advantages 
of the "Color-Lok" process. Over half 
the dealers considered National Paints 
as the line most active in helping to 
increase paint sales. These were all 
National dealers and indicated surpris- 
ing dealer awareness of National's ad- 
vertising effort. 

To the question, "Can you suggest 
any ideas that might help you as a 
dealer, to increase your paint sales?", 
nine dealers specifically mentioned air 
media as good from their point of 
view, and stated they would like to see 
more of it. Here are some of the 
dealer comments: 

"Continue short spots on radio and 
television mentioning a different deal- 
er each day." 

"More tv advertising, and express 
tremendous color selection." 

"Tv and newspaper — descriptive in- 
formation — easy application, very 
washable, odorless and easy cleaning." 

"More television advertising to the 
do-it-yourself market." 

Considering the relatively short pe- 
riod of time I seven weeks ) devoted to 
the introduction of "Color-Lok," deal- 
er response was excellent. Agency and 
client feel continued emphasis of the 
"Color-Lok" process will gain sub- 
stantiallv in consumer and trade iden- 
tification. 

National Paints is now planning to 
continue its recent success with an- 
other campaign, using the same basic 
advertising approach. ^ 



9( 



SPONSOR 



14 SEPTEMBER 1957 



CHI 




Mid-America 



don't settle for 
off-the-cuff 
farm reporting 





get authoritative 
on-the-spot 
farm coverage 

KCMO-Radio 

With a full-time farm news department staffed 
by professional agriculture radio-journalists 

George Stephens. Director of Agriculture 
Jack Wise, Market Reporter 

Power: 50,000 Watts 

ANOTHER 






KCMO-Radio 
WHEN -Radio 
KPHO-Radio 
WOW-Radio 



Kansas City 
Syracuse 
Phoenix 
Omaha 



810 CBS 
620 CBS 
910 ABC 
590 CBS 




v^^^^rp 

^sdith stp^ 

Joe Hartenbower, General Mgr. 
R. W. Evans, Commercial Mgr. 
Represented nationally by Kat; Agency 

KCMO-Radio 

. . . one of Meredith's Big 4 
. . .All-Family Stations. 



® 



Meredith Stations Are Affiliated with Better Homes and Gardens and Successful Farming Magazines 



SPONSOR • 14 SEPTEMBER 1957 



91 



NIGHTTIME 



WSAZ-TV 

DELIVERS 1000 HOMES 

BETWEEN 

7:30 and 10:30 P. M. 

FOR $1.30 



The second station's 

cost per thousand 

homes is $2.39 

84% Higher 



The third station's 

cost per thousand 

homes is $5.42 

317% Higher 



AND ANYTIME 

WSAZ-TV delivers 

ONE THIRD more 

total homes than 

both other 

Huntington-Charleston 

Stations COMBINED 



Source: June 1957 ARB 
All figures based on 
260-time frequency 



CHAN SET 




HUNTINGTON-CHARLESTON, W. VA. 

XT. B.C. WBTWORS 

Affiliated with Radio Stations 

WSAZ. Huntington & WKAZ. Charleston 

LAWRENCE H. ROGERS. PRESIDENT 

Represented by The Katz Agency 



CALL YOUR KATZ MAN 



Tv and radio 
NEWSMAKERS 



**%*• 





>2 



^^^ Ken Jones has joined the radio-t\ depart- 

Jj r^ nienl al Camphell-Ewald. Detroit, in the 

^ newly created post of creative director. 

fj[ The new position of creative director is 

designed to co-ordinate more closeh the 
commercial effort from cop) writing 
through final production. Jones will he 
direct!) responsible to Philip L. McHugh, 
vice president in charge of radio and 
television. Jones comes from Leo Burnetts Chicago office where 
he has heen tv cop\ supervisor for the past five \ears. He began 
his broadcast industry career as a free lance writer-producer in St. 
Louis and before joining Burnett in 1952 was associated with 
Gardner Advertising. Another radio-tv department appointee an- 
nounced by Campbell-Ewald this week was Manson Steffee as copy- 
writer. Steffee was director of tv production at \ anSant-Dugdale. 

Jerome J. Cowen, senior vice president 
at Cunningham & Walsh, has been ap- 
pointed general manager of the agency s 
San Francisco office. Franklin C. W heeler 
will continue as executive vice president 
of the San Francisco office and on the 
board of directors of the agency . The 
selection of a New York executive to direct 
the affairs of the San Francisco office was 

made in order to consolidate agency activities in these two impor- 
tant markets. Cowen has been in charge of the Western Electric 
and American Telephone and Telegraph accounts for the past few 
years and is a member of C&\X s operations committee. He has 
supervised personnel activities and has been in charge of all account 
executives. In addition to these many duties. Cowen has heen the 
director of the agency's "Man from Cunningham & W alsh" program. 

George W. Sreffy, former vice president, 
has been named executive vice president of 
the Yankee Division of RK.0 Teleradio 
Pictures according to an announcement 
made this week b) Norman Knight, presi- 
dent. Stetfv's entire career has heen with 
\ ankee starting in his college da\s when 
he joined WEAN. Providence, in 1927 as 
a radio operator. Before that he got hi* 
feet wet in radio as an amateur radio operator, \fter graduation 
from Providence College in 1929, he was transferred to the engi- 
neering staff of \\ \ \C. Boston. After this fundamental background 
in the technical end of the business. Steffy turned to producing. 
From 1934 to PH4 he was production director for \\ NAC and the 
whole Yankee Network in New England. In 1044 he was elected 
the v.p. in charge of program operations for the Yankee Division. 




SPONSOR 



14 SEPTEMBER 1951 







713,717 Jim Hookers... 

Capital ol Indiana . . Heartland of the Midwest . . . one ol the most 
important commercial and industrial centers in the country . . . no less the hub 
ot one of the really big television markets . . . that's Indianapolis! 

dm Hooker works here. He's a skilled technician with one of the several 
large pharmaceutical companies that call Indianapolis home. And he's a ha: 
industrious man whose efforts have amply provided tor his family's welfare. 
Of course, like other Hoosiers, his entertainment : WIS1 11 V. ^j^ 

There are 71 $,716 more television families like the Hookers in the bic area 
served by WISH-TV. Smart advertisers want to reach them. They do it over 
INDIANAPOLIS WISH-TV (jfc)) the station that dominates the nation's 1 ith television market 

and that consistently has more viewers in Indianapolis than all other 
? stations combined. Represented by Boiling. 

- rces ARB 7 57, NS1 Arc.i < 57, Telcpulsc . 57, TV M 

A CORINTHIAN STATION Responsibility in Br 0l ting 

KOTV Tulsa < KGUL-TV Galveston, serving Houston -WANT & WANE-TV Fort Wayne -WISH & WISH-TV Indianapolis 



WISH- TV 



SPONSOR • 14 SEPTEMBER l u i, 93 



SPONSOR 



Tv costs 

There is in the air (and we have so reported) a tendency 
to watch television more carefully this fall than ever before 
for trouble spots. Our probing among client and agency 
people leads us, in fact, to the conclusion that television costs 
in future months will have to undergo more complete justi- 
fication than has been true in past seasons. 

But, as we gauge the sentiments of clients, there is little 
desire to cut total television expenditures. Rather there is 
the feeling that costs can be trimmed on non-essentials so that 
the resulting savings can be put to better use in the tv budget. 

For example, if a client is spending $1,000 a week which 
is not absolutely essential on programing, you can argue this 
isn't important percentagewise. But the same $1,000 added 
up over a 52-week period can represent the cost of a 
booster promotion in an important market — perhaps a day- 
time tv saturation to accomplish a key marketing objective. 

Nighttime radio came back 

Over recent months sponsor has been urging admen to 
take advantage of a unique opportunity — the chance to get 
in on the ground floor in the resurgence of nighttime radio. 

We repeat the suggestion. 

For here is a trend that we believe our readers can't afford 
to overlook. Because it is a good buy; because this is grad- 
ually being recognized; because daytime radio is overflowing, 
nighttime radio must stage a comeback. 

Here are some signs. 

Reps report night business volume well ahead of last year. 

More evidence of a big nighttime audience is turning up 
— and this is not an audience of people who don't own tv sets 
but substantially the same audience as listens to daytime 
radio. 

The only real remaining roadblock to night radio is a 
psychological one on the part of clients and it is up to the 
sellers to clear the road. 

We believe the salesman who intelligently documents 
nighttime radio's case will make friends among clients and 
wind up winning their appreciation as well as an order. 



6 

^ 



this we fight FOR: Study the flow of net- 
work radio business (page 46) and you'll see 
the radio's spring revival is moving into fall. 
But there's still no move to reveal all-important 
figures on how much net radio clients spend. 



94 



lO-SECOND SPOTS 

By popular request, 10-Second Spots 
this week reprints Shakespearean 
quotes culled from past year's columns 
keyed to the new show season. 

Shakespeare on ratings: 

Hamlet, what a falling off was 

there! i 1 I 
The pla\. 1 remember, pleased not the 

million. I 2 I 
The baby figure of a giant mass — (3) 
A thing devised by the enemy. (4) 
Comparisons are odorous. (5) 
The weakest goes to the wall. I 6) 
These things are beyond all use, and 

I do fear them. (7) 
Confusion now hath made his master- 
piece. (8) 
Trifles light as air are to the jealous 
confirmations strong as proof of 
holy writ. (9) 
It makes us or it mars us. (10) 
They laugh that win. (11) 
A blank, my lord. 1 12 I 



•SOURCES: (1) Hamlet. A I. s 5; (2) Hamlet. A II, 
s 2: (3) Troilus & OreElda, A I, s 3; (41 Rich. III. 
A V, s 3; (".I Much Ado, A III, s 5; (Ci Romeo & 
Juliet, A I, s 1; (71 J. Caesar, A II, s 1 : (81 Macb.. 
A U, s 2; <<Jt Othello, A III, s 3; (10) Othello. A V. 
s 1; (11) Othello. A IV, s 1 ; (12) Twelfth Sight. A 
II, s 4. 



More Shakespeare on ratings: 

The ripest fruit first falls. (1) 
Taking the measure of an unmade 

grave. ( 2 I 
We have seen better da vs. (3) 
The instruments of darkness tell us 

truths, i 4 i 
L neasy lies the head that wears a 

crown. ( 5 I 



•SOURCES: ill Richard II. A II. s 1; (2) Ilomeo & 
Juliet, A III - ■:. (3) Tlmon "f Athens. A III, 6 1: 
(4) Macbeth, A I. - :f; (5) ll.r.ry IV. A III. s 1. 



* Shakespeare on copywriters: 

. . . and chronicle small beer. (1) 
He draweth out the thread of his ver- 
bosity finer than the staple of his argu- 
ment. I 2 i 
Devise, wit: write, pen. (3 I 
That hath a mint of phrases in his 

brain, i 4 I 
That un-lettered small-knowing soul. 

(5) 
Here will be an old abusing of God's 
patience and the Kings English. (6) 
I was not born under a rhyming 
planet. I 7 I 

■SOURCES: (1) Othello. A II. s 1 (2) love's I-abor 
Lost. A v. < l: (S) Ibid, A I. s 2: (!) Ibid, A I, s 1; 
(5) Ibid, A I. s 1: (6) Merry Wives of Windsor, A I. 
s 4; (7) Mueh Ado About Nothing. A V, s 2. 






SPONSOR 



14 SEPTEMBER 1957 






Wlnt's ,uu at KOW 1 I 







H*««i^ 



Nothing much new ownership hut the same 
•kl rating story: 

FIRS I 




Monotonous, isn't it? 





Nope, we love it— and so 
do our advertisers. 




V 



Latest (J August) Hooper s K '■'• H firsl 

first all day will 

For 



KOWH, Omaha 

Refresented v Aa •• 1 






AtW&G -ftrf* 



V 



5> 



WemO^W EEOA BCASTlNO SYSTEM, INC, 

-sS- - *■" Asencies 

we've got news f or you 

• • * , than 400 markets from w» 

. ._ inn MUTUAL tnan -*y« Orleans. 1 ni 



■ W w - 

u If Unv on 400 MUTUAL 

stationsthat blank etthenat ^ ^ ^^ oi 

th e-minute news, spoil. 

Americans everywhere. ^ 

greatest advertising bus in 
is available to you. 

- = 00 ne r news program. >oui 



^^ vt ,« Vm-k to Los Angeles- 

to 400 markets t rom Ne Vn ^^ 
from Detroit to N«*0> ton homc mi on lhe 

ztsr»- ,. gAmei , 

your products. tQ 



^ THE TOP NEWSCASTERS READY tO "SP- 
HERE ARE SOME OF THE TOP 
FOR YOU: ri„Krlel Hec 



SPORTSCASTERS 



Fulton Lewis Jr. 
Robert F. Hurleigh 

Westbrook Van Voorh.s 

Bill Cunningham 



Gabriel Heatter 
John B. Kennedy 
Cedric Foster 
John Wingate 

Harry Wismer 
Art Gleeson 



Frankie Fr.sch M lKIC-°dd flexibility 



Join th«W «*»« rtl '* M 

)10! ,o„,Mm-AL: lds 

GENERAL MOTOBS'K J. chrysler 

TOBACCO CO. • K , RA ; VLAV . RKAD ERS 

LIGGE I T& Skk R 'S^oto B01 l 

DIGEST • Q UA „ TIM . aosURANCE 



mutua I 



BROADCASTING 
SYSTEM, INC 



SCPUMKll 
20< a copy |||< 




presenting... 




the NEW KEY to the 
KEY OMAHA MARKET 




OMAHA'S KEY 



TELEVISION 



NOW ON THE AIR, bringing 
NEW PROGRAMS, NEW ENTERTAINMENT, 
NEW AVAILABILITIES, to the KEY Omaha area. 

CHANNEL 7 

OMAHA WORLD HERALD STATION 

Eugene S. Thomas, Gen. Mgr. 



TELEVISION 
AND THE URGE 
TO MERGE 

'IK-- growing trend t<»- 
vxlihJ agenc) mergers 
has been stimulated bj 
the bandlii <>i 

television sod provid* 
m^ associated sen . 

Page 31 



Where 87% 
of all spot 
buys are made 

Page 34 

Can you predict 
your Nielsen 
from a Trendex? 

Page 38 

Let's define 

station 

merchandising 

Page 41 



man 




FIELDS OF COTTON present a breath-taking sight 
throughout Georgia's rich farm belt where other crops and 
livestock also add to the state's $600-million farm income. 
Also famous on the Georgia scene is WAGA-TV, the state's 
leading television station. Top CBS-TV and local program- 
ing, tallest tower and maximum power make WAGA-TV 
your best television buy in the Southeast's No. 1 market. 




STOKER BROADCASTING COMPANY SALES OFFICES 

NEW YORK-625 Madison Ave. • CHICAGO-230 N. Michigan Ave • SAN FRANCISCO-1 1 1 Suiter St 




Represented Nationally by THE KATZ AGENCY, Inc. 



if you buy 




you should buy 



in philadelphi 




most radio advertisers do! 



PHILADELPHIA'S GREAT STATION 



m 



represented nationally BY gill perna. inc. Neu York, Chicago. Los Angeles. San Francisco, Bostr 



SPONSOR • 21 SEPTEMBER 1951 



21 SEPTEMBER 1957 • Vol. II. So. 38 



,^m 



THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE TV/RADIO ADVERTISERS USE 



DIGEST OF ARTICLES 

Is tv behind the urge to merge? 

31 [ncreasing number of agencj mergers -ecu] to l><- stimulated \>\ high 
cost I'l handling television and providing the collateral client services 

Where spot buys are made 

34 \bout 87' ', nl all spot radio and l\ buys come Iron) four cities -New 
York, Chicago, San Francisco and L.A. Here's a percentage breakdown 

This bank isn't afraid to sell 

36 Twin Cit) Federal skyrocketed deposits from $13 million in 19-11 to 
J265 million in 1957. The secret: radio, tv, hard-sell and promotion 

Can you predict your Nielsen from Trendex? 

38 spONson study shows Trendex and Nielsen ratings differ significant!) 
lis program type and suggests the danger of over-simplified formulas 

What is station merchandising? 

41 You have no yardstick for measuring station performance unless you 
know, lint man> times it's easier to say what merchandising isn't 



FEATURES 

18 Sponsor Backstage 

53 Film-Scope 

24 49th and .Madison 

64 News & Idea Wrap-Up 

7 Newsmaker of the Week 

66 Picture Wrap-Up 

60 Radio Results 

48 Sponsor Asks 

90 Sponsor Hears 



9 Sponsor-Scope 

98 Sponsor Speaks 

58 Spot Buys 

98 Ten Second Spots 

16 Timebuyers at Work 

96 Tv and Radio Newsmakers 

87 Washington Week 

28 Women's \\ eek 



In Upcoming Issues 

Complete — and final — fall tv schedule 

This month's Tv Basics will have a complete rundown on new fall net- 
work schedules with client and agenc) listings, complete program costs 

SPONSOR'S sixth annual Negro Market Issue 

28 September special supplement will include marketing men's appraisal 
of the Negro market, its size and potential. There'll be analyses of 
Negro -tation programing, sales and merchandising; case histories on 
local and national advertisers; market data on Negro population, income 






Editor and Publisher 

Norman R. Glenn 

Secretary-Treasurer 

Elaine Couper Glenn 

VP— Assistant Publisher 

Bernard Piatt 

General Manager 

Arch L. Madsen 

EDITORIAL DEPARTMENT 
Executive Editor 

Miles David 
News Editor 

Ben Bodec 
Senior Editors 

Alfred J. Jaffe 
Evelyn Konrad 
Jane Pinkerton 
W. F. Miksch 

Film Editor 

Barbara Wilkens 
Assistant Editors 

Joan W. Holland 
Jack Lindrup 
Lois Heywood 
Contributing Editors 

Bob Foreman 
Joe Csida 

Art Editor 

Phil Franznick 
Production Editor 

Erwin Ephron 

ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT 
New York Manager 

Charles W. Godwin 
Western Manager 
Edwin D. Cooper 
Southern Manager 
Herb Martin 
Midwest Manager 
Sam B. Schneider 
Mid-Atlantic Manager 
Donald C. Fuller 
Production Manager 
Jane E. Perry 

Administrative Staff 
M. Therese McHugh 
Dorris Bowers 
George Becker 

Circulation Department 
Seymour Weber 
Emily Cutillo 
Estelle Schulman 

Accounting Department 

Laura Oken 
Laura Datre 
Readers' Service 

Marilyn Hammond 



Member of Business Publications 
Audit of Circulations Inc. 



SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. 

combined with TV. Executive, Editorial. Circu- 
lation and Advertising Offices: 40 E. 49th St. 
(49th & Madison) New York 17, N. Y. Tele- 
phone: MUrray Hill 8-2772. Chicago Office: 
612 N. Michigan Ave. Phone: Superior 7-9863. Los 
Angeles Office: 6087 Sunset Boulevard. Phone. 
HOIIywood 4-8089. Printing Office: 3110 Elm 
Ave., Baltimore 11, Md. Subscriptions: United 
States $3 a year. Canada and foreign $4. Sin- 
gle copies 20c. Printed in U.S.A. Address all 
correspondence ro 40 E. 49th St., N. Y. 17, 
N. Y. MUrray Hill 8-2772. Published weekly by 
SPONSOR Publications Inc. Entered as 2nd class 
matter on 29 January 1948 at the Baltimore 
postoffice under the Act of 3 March 1879. 

Copyright 1957 

Sponsor Publications Inc. 



STATE OF ARKANSAS 

EXECUTIVE DEPART 




BE IT KNOWN TO ALL 
MEN PRESENT. THIS 

C I T A J 

FOR DISTINGUISHED SERV1 

IS CONFERRED UPON 

RADIO statu; ths 

IN RECOGNITION LOR 

CONSISTENT AND DISTINGUISHED 

PUBLIC SERVICE TO THE STATE 

OF ARKANSAS. AND ITS PEOPLE. 



Arnold Sykes, (l.-fl As- 

sistant to Artarva-. Governor Foubus 
presents Citation to B. G. Robertson, 
General Manager of KTHS. 




STATE OF ARKANSAS AGAIN 
MAKES AWARD TO KTHS! 



lei April 10.")4. Governor Francis Cherry awarded to KTHS 
the tir>t "distinguished service" citation ever bestowed on 
m\ advertising medium by the Governor of Arkansas . . . 

On June 2<S of this year, another Arkansas Governor — 
Hon. Orval E. Faubus — gave KTHS the second award 
ever conferred for "Distinguished Public Service." 

Backbone of KTIIS's public service programming 
i> the highly unusual weekly show, "Can You Use 
me? — a job-placement service produced in co- 
operation with the Employment Security Division 
of the State of Arkansas. Since its inception in 
1953, job placements from this program have 
averaged a whopping 72 r ' r ! 

In 1956. KTHS also aired more than 500 hours of 
public service programming (not including news) 
— plus more than 13.000 public service announce- 
ments — more than S187.000 in time costs alone! 



Outstanding Public Service . . . ."iii-KW Bignal . . . and 
topnotcb local and CBS programs ill combine i<> make 
KTHS Vrkansas' greatesl advertising value. 



KTHS 



50,000 Watts 
CBS Radio 



BROADCASTING FROM 

LITTLE ROCK, ARKANSAS 

Represented by The Henry I. Christal Co., Inc. 

Under Same Management as KWKH, Shreveport 

Henry Clay, Executive Vice President 
B. G. Robertson, Generaf Manager 



*fm 




HHSdH 




* 






~*& 



w^!**-." 




* 





*Tfc.-*U 





kpmmm 






NATIONAL AWARDS (current) 

OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY AWARD 

First award in the national classification for a program 
directed to special interest groups 

HEADLINERS AWARD 

For consistently outstanding news reporting by a radio 
station 



RADIO TELEVISION NEWS DIRECTORS ASSN. AWARD 
For outstanding radio news operation 

LOCAL AWARDS (current) 

ILLINOIS ASSOCIATED PRESS AWARD 



I 



■ 



asm 



^^^H 



First place — Best local regularly scheduled news program 
First place — Best local regularly scheduled farm show 
First place — Best local regularly scheduled sports show 
First place — Best local special events coverage 
First place — Best general excellence of news presentation 
Second place — Best documentary program 

CHICAGO FEDERATED ADVERTISING CLUB AWARD 

For local special features — Public service 
For local programs — Audience participation 
For local programs — Drama 



{KWlfl 



*v 




.... 







199,251 Bill Wagners... 



WANE- TV 

FORT WAYNE 



In 1794, Gen. Anthony Wayne built a fort to fight the Miami Indians. No trace 
of it remains today, but its history lives on in the people tViat make up 
Fort Wayne, Indiana and the Fort Wayne television market . . . because 
people . . . not sites, make cities and markets . . . people like Bill Wagner, a 
skilled machinist in a factory manufacturing agricultural machinery. 

Prosperous hard-working Bill and his family are typical of the 199,251 television 
families that are the Fort Wayne television market . . . families that look to 
WANE-TV ^© for their news and entertainment . . . families with 
buying incomes of over $1,250,000,000. 

Smart advertisers want to reach these 199,251 Wagner families. They do it over 
WANE-TV ^^ the leading station in the billion-dollar all-UHF 
Fort Wayne market. Represented by Petry. 

Sources: 15 County Area ARB 2/57; TV Mag. 3/57 & 8/57; Copyrighted . . . Sales Management 1957. 



A CORINTHIAN STATION Responsibility in Broadcasting 

KOTV Tulsa • KGUL-TV Galveston, serving Houston • WANE & WANE-TV Fort Wayne ♦ WISH & WISH-TV Indianapolis 



SPONSOR 



21 SEPTEMBER 1957 



% tWmwmm «» u v\ ■ i Id % 



e week 



The addition of two new principals to the 25*year-old Rutael 
If, Seeds $hop (hence to be railed Keyes, Hodden X Jours. 
Inc.) brings back to the agency folil Edward H. Madden, 
whose varied career in advertising in< holes experience in 

network television and the mysterious li.nil of bartered linn'. 

The newsmaker: Edward D. Madden, who will be | >i « - i 
drill of the new Keyes, Madden & Jones agency, bows to no man in 
the depth and variet) of advertising experience. Hiough he will 
operate as the marketing and research expert on the K \ I \ ) man 
ment team, hi- knowledge "I television will influence kej decisions. 
I In- is more significant than it sounds, foi the central concept ol 
the new agenc) s operations is that t"|i management w ill plaj a 
direct and active role in client ad planning. 

Maddens i\ know-how brackets both spot and network. He was 
vice president in charge ol t\ op- 
erations and sales at NBC dui ing 
\ ideo s transition into a nal ional 
medium. Following this he be- 
came executive vice president and 
genera] manage] ol \ I < >t i < >ti I *i< - 
tures for Television after which In- 
went Id International Latex as vice 
president. In the latter two jobs 
hr was deepl) involved in barter 
operations. \i Latex he negoti- 
ated and managed the placement 
of what is still the biggest barter 
operation of them all: the ex- 
change of Matt} Fox' KM) feature package for time to spot Latex 
commercials, now running For about a year. 

Madden won t reveal what Latex is spending for the bartered time 
hut he estimates that if he went out, cash in hand, to bin the time 
in the conventional manner, it would cost $17.5 million annually. 
I hi> is an interesting calculation in view of its preciseness and the 
fact that l\B estimates of Latex spending at the one-time rate add 
up to s 2.<> million for six months of 1957. 

Latex considers the monej well spent. Madden uses the word 
"'enormous'" in describing Latex' recent sales increases and says 
there is no douht t\ triggered the surge. 

though Latex is expanding its barter deals beyond the top I' 111 
markets it is now in. Madden feels that, except for small operations, 
the big barter deal has seen its day. "You've got t" have good 
product." he said. '"What's left 1ml l'ai amount's package?" 

KM&J starts otT 1 October with $15 million in billings from the 
Seeds accounts (of which 40-459? go to radio-h I plus anothei v l-_' 
million expected to be announced shortly. One big problem Madden 
intends to tackle is seeing that tv commercial- that are aired arc t\ 
commercials that sell, particular!} important these days, he -aid. in 
view of thin profit margins ami high t\ costs. Madden will lean 
heavily on research to solve this problem. ^ 




Edward l>. \la<hl,;i 



$1 



SPONSOR 



21 SEPTEMBER 1951 



LOUISVILLE IGA 

MOVES 20.000 
PRODUCTS IN 

CICC0 
PROMOTION 

H. RUNYAN & SONS, Louis- 
ville IGA distributors, pulled 
over 20,000 entries in THE 
CISCO KID's Name-the-Poriy- 
Contest — and each entry rep- 
resented the sale of an IGA 
product! They reported: 

"Our prestige has been 
raised considerably in all 
areas; our customers are 
more IGA conscious We 
are definitely pleased with 
our sponsorship." 

Ask lo *ee more lucceu sloriei of 

JHE WORLDS 6REAIESJ SALESMAN! 

"THE CISCO KID" 



<&&ee>e<U0& 







Daytime Listener Homes 
"At least once a week" 

Nighttime Listener Homes 
"At least once a week" 



469,720 56,480 
831,640 240,350 



There is a difference... it's W S M radio 

50,000 WATTS, CLEAR CHANNEL. NASHVILLE • BLAIR REPRESENTED • BOB COOPER, GENERAL MANAGER 



SPONSOR • 21 SEPTEMBER 1957 



\ld\! lignificant h and ndio 

newt of the week with interpretation 

m depth jur busy reodert 



SPONSOR-SCOPE 



21 SEPTEMBER Sm>i t*. m;i\ be due for ;i nice windfall from daytime advertisers. Here's the 

Ccvyrlgh! r 1.7 
SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. piclllie: 

More and more drug and detergent manufacturers are billing their products as 
multi-purpose items. Km example, a \\.i\ makei wants lii- shiner-uppei to be known as 
a floor cleaner, too. Thia maj be fine sales- wise, hut on the i\ networks it results in prod- 
uct conflicts. \- a specific case in point: 

Genera] Foods' American LaFrance describes itself both .1- a bluing .tn<l as a deter- 
gent. Tin* networks can fit it is as a bluing, hut the detergenl angle \> <»ti l<l apsel 
other advertisers. 

So here's a budget of over S.100.000 kicking around ! housewife audi 

ence is mandatory, and yet the t\ networks can'l accomi late it undei present circumstances. 

Spot thus could find some nice pickings. Foods, t<><>. arc possible prospects. - 
eral already go in for the swivel- jointed approach notabl) the citrus people who infer thai 
their products are good for colds. 

The Chicago partner of a major rep company explained this week whj -pot 
tv billings out of the Windy City aren't so bonne*, as the*, once were. He cites 
these cases: 

• Kellogg f Burnett), which could be counted on for about $5 million a year in spot. 
is now totalh ABC T\ . 

• Seven Up ( JWT), good for at least 11.5 million in spot, is sponsoring Zorro on the 
same network alternate weeks this season. 

His cheerful postscript: Spot radio hillings are as solid as e\er. 

The slowdown in spot tv nevertheless is more of a relative rather than 

alarming — thing. 

SPONSOR-SCOPE this week asked three reps, whose station lists represent a prerrj b 

cross-section of the field, how their tv accumulative for the fir-t eight months of 1957 com- 
pared with a vear ago. 

The increases averaged out to 9.2 r ' f . 

For radio, the average was 31%. 

\ shaken Dancer-Fitzgerald-Sample timebuyer this week told of his encoun- 
ter with so-ealled radio "fringe time.*" 

He phoned a station, and .... 

TIMEBUYER: What's available in something around 9:30 a.m. across the board? 
STATION: We're loaded to the brim in early morning, but I can give you a schedule 
around 5:30 a.m. 

TIMEBUYER: It sounds much too earK. hut what's the price? 

STATION: The same rate as at 0:30. 

TIMEBUYER: Fantastic! 

STATION: No, realistic. Our price is geared to the demand. 

Bristol-Myers will be hark in radio the first of the year with at lea-t .1 1500,- 
000 budget. 

(The drug-toiletries manufacturer was "n NBC Radio's News Wound the Clock for a 
w hile this year.*! 

SPONSOR • 21 SEPTEMBER 1957 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 



The NAKTB unveiled its plan for a county-by-county audit of tv station cir- 

culation al a regional meeting in Schenectad) thi> week. 

The basics of the plan (which was field tested in Paterson, \. J. and llif.'li Point, 
Y C. i are these: 

• Measurement will be via telephone interviews. 

• Am home that views a station 15 minutes or more in any day will be considered 
a unit <d' dail) circulation. 

• Am home that views a station 15 minutes or more continuously a week will be 
deemed a unit of weekly circulation. 

The audit service will be supplied to station- on an annual basis, with the cost per 
station ranging between $1,100 and $25,000 (for an average of $4,500 per station). 
The plan will he presented to at least eight regional meetings. 



Slenderella, which is reaching out into the products field, will he spending 
over $4 million the next year — about 85% of it in air media. 

The spot timetable will go something like this in terms of products and starting 

dates: 

The salons: Immediately, five t\ spots a week on \(> station- in 11 markets. 

Slenderella Bread: Presently testing in Detroit, but gradually will go national — most- 
l\ t\ spot, starting in October. 

Slenderella Cook Book. Bras, and Girdles: Radio exclusively, starting in Decem- 
ber. 

Slenderella Non-Fattening Jelly: Spot l\. beginning in Januar\. 

The compan) meantime wants some network fare. too. The problem here, though, 
is waste coverage. It needs onl\ 37 markets. 

Tv football has become a highly saleable ami merchandisable commodity be- 
cause it's a good attraction for the entire family. 

That's one of the big reasons wh\ NBC TV has loaded itself with at least 18 football 
broadcasts this season. 

For an insight into the audience composition of football, note this ARB break- 
down for five representative games last year: 

CAME MEN 

Bia Ten 52 

TCI vs. Arkansas 55 

Iowa \-. Minnesota 55 

Mich. State vs. Minnesota 53 

\rm\ vs. Nav) 53 

\YFR \r,E 54 



Stanley Pulver this week took up at Colgate where he had left off several 
months ago at Lever Bros: media supervision. 

His post is in the toiletries division. Print as well as the broadcast media side are in 
his bailiwick. 



NBC TV thinks that the past week's meeting with its affiliates advisory com- 
mittee will bring rewarding results in one respect: 

It will get better cooperation in clearing time for its Today and Tonight shows. 

The network >a\s that it has quite a number of prospects I including Schlitz and 
Pabst l in line for Tonight sponsorship, providing enough stations can be brought into 
the line-up. 

The excuse affiliates have offered is previous feature film commitments. 

Billings for Todaj have been running $1.5 million behind the previous \ear"s take of 
$7.5 million. 



10 SPONSOR • 21 SEPTEMBER 1957 



WOMEN 


' IIII.DR 


28 


20 


29 


16 


30 


15 


31 


16 


31 


16 


30 


16 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 



I In- leader of the old network radio gangol a decade ago — Pel <• — *.i- back 
in iii«- fold again last week (\%ith \M< 

\'i.l the implications ol the evenl were greatei than the ordei involved 1" thirt) and 
six-second spol announcements pel week, for 

I i It was the first piece of PAG network radio business In almoal two and 
;i half j ears : and 

2) With P & G bai k. all hut one of the I 5 leaders ut 19 I.', .i^.iin are on the net- 
work li*ts. 

Here's a quick picture of what has taken pla 



' I |{|{| MM I -IM. 



1948 R WK \|i\ I R I [SI R \i; ( | BS MBS 



Mil 



1 Proctei v\ Gamble \ 

Sterling Drug \ 

I General Mill- \ \ 

1 General Foods \ \ \ 

Gillette \ \ 

6 Miles Laboratories \ 

• Campbell Soup* 

Lever Broa. \ \ 

9 I iggetl & Myers \ \ \ 

1" Vmerican Home \ \ 

M Colgate \ 

12 R. J. Reynolds \ \ \ \ 

13 Philip Morris \ \ 
11 Swift \ \ 
15 General Electric \ \ 

'Campbell Soup finds it more expedient t" use -|>"i radio because it lends itself l" the 
company's current i «••_: i< >na I needs in In-half of new brands. 

W hat enticed P&G bark into network radio? 

This was tin' background: 

• Nol long ago Compton did a stud} which showed thai a segment of tin- popu- 
lation was not being covered l»> other media t"i a particulai P&G product. So it 
suggested thai this hole could be plugged up with radio 'the product was Gleem). 

• The next step was to determine how this best could I"- done MK Radio signaled 
it had the answer and gol the nod. 

Note this about recent network purchases: It wasn't numbers alum- that clinched 
the deals. Numerically, Nielsen's Radio Index shows this slighth tern of h 

using radio per average minute: 

PERIOD 6 WU PM MON-FRI. • PM-MID SI N-SAT 

Jan.-April 1957 163,000 homes 1,033,000 h 

Jan.-April 1956 667,000 " « 11.2' 1,381,000 " 

Julv 1057 5,184s000 10.8' (7.7 

Jul) 1956 5,664,000 I 12.0' " " 

So other ingredients figured in the situation — notablj impact and c o ver a ge. 

When agencies look at the daytime programing techniques ol the three radio 
networks, the\ gel these fla»h impressions: 

ABC: Gives the housewife the -ort of entertainment -he like- - background for her 

chores and moment- of relaxation. 

CBS: Load "em with soap operas and tickle 'era with middle-ag spoolers. 
NBC: Balance the diet with drama for relaxation and music for work. 

sponsor • 21 September 1957 LI 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 



Another recognition of radio's resurgence: 115 BBDO account executives 
will have an opportunity to get the lowdown on what's happened to the medium at a 
luncheon being spread at the agency this Wednesday (25). 

This type of hosting is without precedent in the business. 

Network people invited to tell how radio can now be bought and used: John Karol and 
Frank Nesbitt, CBS; Joe Culligan, NBC; Bob Eastman, ABC; Paul Roberts and Hank 
Poster, MBS. 

BBDO's radio-tv director Herminio Traviesas will preside. Bill Hoffman, the 

agency's radio coordinator, arranged the event. 

Like radio, network daytime tv is on a bandwagon. 

\nd like radio, it isn't the statistics alone that brought success. Set tune-in per 
average minute this year has gone up about 23%; but NBC TV this fall will have double 
the daytime billings it had last year. 

The zip behind the rush comes from these additional factors: 

• Rising nighttime tv costs. 

• A tendency among the bigger advertisers to pull some of their dollars out of night- 
time to reduce the risk created bv stiffer audience competition among the three net- 
works during prime hours. 

• An inviting cost-per-1000-homes per-commercial-minute in da\time tv. with 
NBC TV averaging around $1.65 and CBS TV 81.85. 

Where has NBC TV's new daytime prosperity been coming from? Here's a list of the 
sponsors the network has signed up the past six months: 

ADVERTISER EXPENDITURE 

Procter & Gamble $6,000,000 

Lever Bros. 3,000,000 

Chesebrough-Ponds 2,200,000 

Sterling Drug 1,800,000 

Minnesota Mining 1,500,000 

S.O.S. 1,500,000 

General Foods 1,400,000 

Mentholatum 1,000,000 

Dwight & Church 600,000 

Drackett 500,000 

Dixie Cup 450,000 

Lanolin Plus 450,000 

Pharmaco 450,000 

Lehn & Fink 450,000 

Welch Grape Juice 400,000 

Park & Tilford 300,000 

Gossard 150,000 

Star-Kist 150,000 

TOTAL $22,400,000 

INorelco electric shaver has arranged for this mixed package as a six-week pre- 
Christmas promotion: 

• $64,000 Question: 2 weeks major sponsorship and four weeks minor mention. 

• Walter Winchell Files: 4 weeks major sponsorship and six weeks minor mention. 

For other news coverage in this issue, see Newsmaker of the Week, page 7: 
Film-scope, page 53: Spot Buys, page 58; News and Idea Wrap-Up. page 64; Washington 
Week, page 87; sponsor Hears, page 90; and Tv and Radio Newsmakers, page 96. 

12 SPONSOR • 21 SEPTEMBER 1957 









The Twin Cities find the range on good radio 
and advertisers find the range on the Twin Cities 
with first place WDGY 

WDG» s cooking on all burner s : 

Hooper: WDGY is first with : 'l ' ' . of the daytime audience 7 a.ra 6 p.m a 
age), Monday-Saturday, • 1 1 1 1 \ August. 

Trendex: WDGY has 29.9 95 average share oi audience, 7 a.i 6 p.m., Mondaj 
through Saturday . 

I'uls, : WDGY has 189 firsl place quarter hours against 128 for the i tion 

Advertisers are capitalizing merrilj on this 

change in Twin Cities radio listening. WU(j| I 

Want to tin some capitalizing I See John Blair wattt 

. . . or WDGY General Manager Jack Thayer Minncipolis-St. Paul 


















TODAY'S RADIO FOR TODAY'S SELLING 



WDGY Minneapolis St. Paul 
WHB Kansas City 
WQAM Miami 

REPRESENTED BY JOHN BLAIR & CO. 



TODD STORZ, PRESIDENT 



WTIX New Orleans 

REPRESENTED BY ADAM YOUNG INC. 



SPONSOR • 21 SEPTEMBER l').T. 



13 



14 



Mark this marke 



on your list... 



CENTRAL AND SOUTHERN ALABAMA is the home of 
1,000,000 people in 35 counties — one-third of 
Alabama's population and retail sales! 

\ou reach this big and growing market only 
through WSFA-TV's maximum-power VHF 
signal. You cannot cover it with any other TV 
station or combination of stations! 

Mark Central and Southern Alabama on your 
list... and buy it with WSFA-TV! 



WSFA-TV's 35 Alabama counties* 

Population 1 ,093 

Retail Sales $ 741,637 

Food Store Sales $ 1 84,927 

Drug Store Sales $ 21,859 

Effective Buying Income $l,062,69t 

* Does not include 3 Georgia and 3 Florida bonus counii 

Source: Sales Management Survey of Buying F 
May 1957. 




Represented by the Katz Ac* 



ol'ONSOK • 21 SKl'TI MB] R L95' 



J.. 




The WKY Television System, Inc. 

WKY-TV and WKY Oklahoma City 

WTVT Tar pa - St. Petersburg 



SPONSOR 



21 SEPTEMBER 1 ( >"iT 



15 




78 markets snapped up in first 
six weeks! Coca-Cola in Atlanta! 
NBC 0-&-0 in Los Angeles! 
Dixie Beer! Bowman Biscuit! 
Prescription 1500 in 10 markets! 
J. Carrol Naish, the NEW 
Charlie Chan, "the best ever 
to do the role." See it today, 
and you'll have to agree the 
new CHARLIE CHAN sells! 




Hurry! Marketsare 
being reserved 
today! Wire or 
phone for private 
screening! 



Television Programs of America, Inc. 
488 Madison Ave., N. Y. 22 • PLaza 5-2100 



1 ■ 



I Timebuyers 
at work 




Bill Bushway, MacManus, John & Adams. Bloomfield Hills. Mich., 
reports that the agency recently bought a short-term saturation 
schedule for the Saran Wrap division of the Dow Chemical Co. and 
decided to measure its effectiveness. "With the cooperation of the 
stations and their reps, we were able to conduct an interview survev 
at chain stores," Bill says. "Over 
2.000 returns were received from 
39 marketing areas. The survey 
showed the powerful impact of 
television even with a short-term 
schedule. Over 50ft of the per- 
sons interviewed were aware of the 
new Saran Wrap package and ap- 
proximately I5fc actually pur- 
chased this new package during 
the campaign. Television created 
substantial public recognition as 
well as demand for the product. 

Both the client and the agency were satisfied with the results. Bill 
is also timebuyer for the Agricultural Division of Dow. He'd like 
stations and reps to provide more facts on concentrated farming 
areas — accurate county figures and specific farm population data. 
"The only statistics now available are from the 1954 Agricultural 
Census and these are outdated and inadequate for present buying." 



Ed Tashjian, Emil Mogul Co.. New York, timebuyer for Tintex 
Dyes and Esquire Shoe Polish, wonders how many timebuyers can 
answer these questions affirmativelv. "How many times have you 
visited markets, stations, retail and wholesale outlets even on a vaca- 
tion trip?" Ed asks. "Have you heard and viewed the gamut of the 

radio and television programing 
on stations in your own market? 
Do you studv the complexit\ of a 
market and endeavor to discern its 
basic character and personalis? 
Have you used, or at least famili- 
arized yourself with, the products 
and services you represent? Have 
you tried to visualize the amount 
of money you spend though not a 
penny of it passes through yow 
hands? Have you placed sched- 
ules without the exclusive use of 
ratings and slide-rule computations? Have you attended and par- 
ticipated in meetings with clients and account men? Have you read 
the fine print on a standard AAAA contract form?" Ed feels that the 
answers to questions like these are a measure of a buyer's effective- 
ness and of his imagination as well. *'Bu\ers. too," he says, "must 
use 'depth" to complete their evaluation of stations and market-. 




SPONSOR 



21 SEPTEMBER 1957 



■ ■ K.* i 


Ml 



:o 



>* i 






u 






!/ 



*-.*f 



y 






\ 




*|M kta C Slilli Sales Mp . Russell W McCortli. Auditor. Rr.mond W Rodgers OikI Enjnew Pel* Thornun PoNorr fct . Haraid loai V f Ktibrnf traa* I (Tat) Inio Sai I M* bra R lm NaBii to Cava law Pray* 

8 Who Sell Detergents, Milk, Brotherhood 



-r 



l r Symphony, with a deficit of $325,000. may have to close. 

r < can we sell the public on the need for immediate help'" 

1 is detergent is new to your market. What's the best way to 

uxluce it and get dealers to stock it right away?" 

» ' have a limited budget. We want to reach housewives . . . 

i show results in a week." 

f w can we effectively sell beer? Milk? Toys? Swimming Pools? 

'(-oitalization? Mattresses? Brotherhood:" 

Ise 8 men— along with their experienced staffs— face prob- 



lems like these every day. Their knowledge and understanding 
of America's 8th market with its 1 'i million TV homes, and 
their 100 years of broadcast ins: experience, all help in solving 
such problems. 

They have an occasional strike-out- hut th<- batting aver- 
age is pretty high. You can see the results in ratings, in sales 
success stories— in the high regard the community has for 
Channel 2— the Pittsburgh Area's No. 1 Station. 

What's your problem? 



Qq 



CH ANNEL 2 I S NO 



D I Mk N F 

■A- 



PITTSBU RG H 



>2 



WESTINGHOUSE BROADCASTING COMPANY, INC. 

RADIO BOSTON. WB/-S-WBZA PITTSBURGH. »D»A CLEVELAND, una FORT WAYNE. WOWO 

CHICAGO. WIND PORTLAND. HEX TELEVISION BOSTON. *BJ TV BALTI MORE. «I7 TV 

PITTSBURGH, KOKA TV • CLEVELAND. KYW-TV SAN FRANCISCO. «I>IX 

WIND REPRESENTED BY AM RADIO SALES • WJZ TV REPRESENTED BY BLAIR TV • K°IX REPRESENTED BY THE lATJ AGENCY INC 
ALL OTHER *BC STATIONS REPRESENTED BY PETERS. CClFFIN. WOODWARD INC 



by joe Csida 



HIGH VALUE 
MARKET 




OFFERING 

OUTSTANDING VALUES 

IN 




The great Columbus, 
Georgia Metropolitan Area with its 
ideal test cross-section of Fort Ben 
ning, Ca., — the largest Training Cen- 
ter in the U.S. 



Coverage 

A total of 53 Georgia and 
Alabama counties completely 
dominated in Pulse Survey May 
1957. Top 50 once week shows. 
Leadership in 449 of 451 quar- 
ter hours! 

radio PEu&y&am 




WRBL radio leads in 
homes delivered, by 55°r 
— day or night monthly 
WRBL— over 54,420. Sta- 
tion B— 34,940 Best buy 
day or night, weekly or 
daly is WRBL ( NCS No 
21. 



£&£23 



»:♦•• 



V REFERENCE 

Community confidence and siles results are proven 
by a con.inuously growing family of local adver- 
tisers. Your rioliingbcry man has proof of local 
preference for WRBL. 

WRBL 

AM-FM-TV 

COLUMBUS, CEORCIA 



CALL HOLUNGBERY CO. 



Sponsor 







Jack Paar vs. feature film 

Last December at the bright, new and almost 
incredibh lush Americana Hotel in Miami 
Beach, when General David Sarnoff <;a\e his 
son. Bobby to the NBC affiliates as their new 
president, Bobby (among other items I sounded 
the battle cry on a war yet to come. Well, it has 
come. It is the struggle of live network tele\ i- 
sion against feature films. And though Bobby 
could not have known about the specific situation last December, an 
historic engagement in the war, involving NBC, is now joined. 

The networks, said Bobbv in Miami Beach, must not permit tele- 
vision to become a neighborhood movie theatre, featuring old Holly- 
wood films. The affiliates, suggested the new NBC prexv. owe it to 
themselves, and to the medium to keep television predominantly live. 
Now — after laying one of the gaudiest eggs in late night tv history, 
with a Tonight show featuring "America After Dark"" — NBC has 
come up with a real live late-night smash hit in the new Tonight, 
starring Jack Paar. As pathetic as the Paar predecesser show was, 
just so charming, relaxed, entertaining and appealing is the new 
Paar Tonight. Such eminent and tough critics as Jack OBrian 
(Journal-American I. Ed Sullivan (News I, Ben Gross (News), Dick 
Kleiner (NEA), Janet Kern I Chicago American). John Fink I Chi 
Tribune I . and all of the trade press, plus Time, et al have raved over 
the King of Comedy and his various regulars and near-regulars like 
Dodie Goodman. Hans Conreid. Hugh Downs. Eettv Johnson, etc. 
Yes, the show is definitely the surprise smash of the season. But it's 
very existence is threatened by a simple economic fact. 

Film investment demands time 

Too many of the NBC TV affiliates in too many key markets have 
such staggering investments in Hollywood feature film libraries that 
they insist they cannot carry the Jack Paar Tonight show. They 
must, they insist, recoup their heavy feature film investments, and 
one of the prime periods during which thev mav do so is the 11.15 
p.m. to 1 a.m. time occupied by the Paar troupe. Its reported that 
10 of the 56 basic markets are not earning the show. These now 
include such areas as Cleveland. Houston. Boston. Indianapolis, 
Miami. Pittsburgh and Schenectady. And it's reported that in the 
next few weeks, still other kev markets, readying new feature film 
series, will be dropping Tonight. KRON-TV, the San Francisco out- 
let is said to be included in this group. 

Yes, the battle is joined, and NBC T\ is bringing all nuns to bear, 
and most intelligently. One of the biggest guns, fortunately for the 
web, is the personable Mr. Paar. himself. It appears that not only 
is Paar one of the smoothest, most ingratiating stars on the current 
television scene, but also one of the most intelligent and realistic of 
video's salesmen and business men. Thus — last Wednesday exerting 
Teddy Bergman of McCann-Erickson and I went to the \BC-I\ 



18 



SPONSOR 



21 SEPTEMBER 1957 



THE 
BIG DRAW 





iENE AUTRY TO CHAMPION YOUR PRODUCT! ROY ROGERS TO TRIGGER YOUR SALES! 

tow, WRC-TV's newly acquired library of full-hour Roy Rogers and Gene 
UJtry feature films will bring new appeal to the choice family viewing 
ime between 5:30 and 6:30 pm in the nation's Capital. Each Monday 
hrough Friday, these hour-long, complete western dramas will delight 
ind excite Washington small fry... and keep their parents watching 
ind humming the songs these stars made famous the world over. 



There's every kind of appeal -from singing to gun-slinging-m these 
all-time western favorites. Pack your product on the saddle of Roy 
Rogers and Gene Autry ... for the biggest, fastest draw in Washington! 

Call in your NBC Spot Sales representative for details of participation 



W R C "T V * 4 WASHINGTON D C . SOLD BY Q SPOT SALES 



114% MORE audience 
than Station B ALL DAY! 



WILS 



Mar. -Apr. '57 Hooper in Lansing Shows 
MONDAY THRU FRIDAY 



7:00 a.m. -12 noon 
12 noon-6:00 p.m. 



WILS 
61.4 
53.7 



Station B 
23.5 
30.1 



5000 

LIVELY WATTS 



MORE listeners than all other 
stations heard in 
Lansing combined 

Mar. thru Apr. 
average C. E. Hooper, Inc. 




LANSING 



Represented Nationally 
by 

Venard, Rintoul & 
McConnell. Inc. 




WILS 

^ n G ty s s ^\s 






20 



Sponsor backstage continued 



closed circuit full hour color show, previewing its new fall line-up 
fur I lie affiliates, agency people and press. The key emcee, replacing 
Steve Allen, turned out to he Jack Paar. And he did the same ex- 
cellent job of low-pressure, soft and suhtle selling that he does nightly 
on the Tonight show. He talked directly to the affiliates, and it's to 
he hoped he won a few friends and converts. 

Today ( as this is written ) NBC starts a three day meeting with 
its tv and radio affiliates. Tomorrow I Thursday I at the hanquet, 
Jack Paar and key members of the Tonight show will supplv the 
entertainment. It can be written before the fact that Paar and his 
people will entertain the affiliates. Again, however, it is to be hoped 
that he will he able to persuade them to stay with and or pick up the 
show, and to work out their feature film problems in some other 
manner. 

Offer show to non-affiliates? 

I'm very certain that NBC TV brass in programing, sales, station 
relations, and every other department are readying even conceiv- 
able form of ammunition for this earlv battle with the feature film 
foe. It seems to me that the web has some verv strong ammunition. 
To begin with I have the feeling that in markets where the Paar 
Tonight show bucks feature film opposition on competitive stations, 
over a period of time, the Paar ratings will top the old movie rat- 
ings. Should the NBC research boys be able to come up with facts 
of that nature it would surely help. 

I'm fascinated with the purely speculative notion that some way 
may be found to permit a non-NBC affiliated station to carry the To- 
night show, in key markets, where the NBC affiliate has turned it 
down. In other words, on a specific show and situation of this kind. 
is there anything very wrong in the idea of the NBC affiliate having 
a first refusal on the show — and in the event the affiliate exercises 
the refusal, permitting the show to be carried by another station. 

I believe that the Paar show has one feature, which may turn out 
to be vitally important to its advertisers, and which most feature 
film programs will lack. That is the show's star, himself. I believe 
that Jack Paar will turn out to be not only one of the outstanding 
stars in the medium, but that as a salesman, as a representative of 
the sponsor or sponsors of the show, he will be just about ideal. I 
think his warmth and sinceritv will be just as effective in sellin« 
merchandise, as it is in selling himself and the other members of the 
cast of the show. I hope live network television wins this particular 
engagement in the war against feature films. There will be other 
battles between live network and feature films, and it won't be too 
bad. if the feature film side wins some of them. But this one. this 
Tonight battle, is important to tv as a whole. I hope the affiliates 
will find some way to carry the show. ^ 



Letters to Joe Csida are welcome 

Do you always agree with what Joe Csida says in Sponsor 
Backstage? Both Joe and the editors of sponsor will be happy 
ti receive and print your comments. Address them to Joe 
Csida, c/o sponsor, 40 E. 49lh, New York 17, New York. 



sponsor 



21 SEPTEMBER 1957 




It happens every night! 



Seven days a week, Warner Bros, features top 

those of major film companies on competing stations 

in Huntington. W. Va. There, nearly two-thirds 

of all sets in use are tuned to WSAZ-TV from 10:30 

to sign-off (June arb). Actual share of audience for 

Warner Bros, features is a whopping 64.2' , —more 

than double the 24.9^7 for features on Station "B" 

and more than five times greater than the 10.9^ for 

those on Station "C". No surprise, this ... for 



Warner Bros, features have a habit of dominating 
the picture in markets all across the coun* 
To see how quickly they win the ( >hare 

of audience in your area, write or phone: 



a xi 

■ tutors for Associate A1tU$ 

31$ MatlUon A-r M I -a; H-.US-tStS 

TS E ir.j.-c- D' . DEa'born t-tOSO 

Ml B'tan 5; . F; - 
9110 Stourt Bird . CRtsirtnc 6-6SS6 



inc. 




LOS ANCELCS 



Famous on the local scene.. 



It was the leadership and inspiration of George Washington that changed 
Mount Vernon from a quiet country home into the country's number one shrine. 

And it is the leadership in community activities that 

has given national prominence to the Storer stations. 

A Storer station is a local station. 






> 



•- 






yet known throughout the nation 




STORER BROADCASTING COMPANY 




WJW 

Clevelond, Ohio 



WJW-TV 

Oevelond, Ohio 

WJBK 

Detroit, M.ch. 



WJBK-TV 

Defrc 

WAGA 

Atlanta, Ga 



WAGA-TV 



WVUE 



WIBG 

PhilodV . 



WWVA 

.•.--. - g . W. Va 



WGBS 



NEW YORK — 625 Modiion Avanut N«w Yo»k 22 FMoio 1-3940 

SALES OFFICES CHICAGO — 230 N.Michioon Av«nu«. Chitogo 1 Franklin 2-6408 

SAN FRANCISCO— 111 SulUr Sh-»*t, Son Fronciico, Sutttr l-t649 



(SORT OF A SUCCESS STORY) 



TIV- has a new real estate show. It's called "Open 
House." Builders and developers buy time and sell houses. 

I errific idea . . . 

^^ne problem, though. We can't keep a sponsor 
on the show. 



I 



t sells them out of houses too fast. 



I t's really our fault. Some ambulance chaser in the 
sales department had the bright idea of an escape clause 
for any sponsor selling all his houses within four weeks. 
So, we're losing sponsors right and left. 

wwe don't like to bother you with our problems, 
but we would suggest as follows: 

If you've a product — not just houses, 
but any product that's in normally long 
supply— something you won't run out of 
in four weeks or so — put it on KTTV. 

■ our Blair-TV man has the necessary contracts with the 
4-week escape clause carefully inked out . . . 



Los Angeles Times-MGM 
Television 



Represented nationally by BLAIR-TV 



24 



I 49th am 
I Madison 



Tv merchandising 

Please be assured that Proctor Elec- 
tric Companj is most appreciative for 
your recent article on our successful tv 
merchandising. 

sponsor did a splendid job assem- 
bling facts and transposing them into 
interesting reading. The article is be- 
ing distributed throughout our or- 
ganization and to our customers. 

\\ illiam Y. E. Rambo 
advertising manager 
Proctor Electric, Phila. 

The barter menace 

This letter is to express rueful admira- 
tion for the excellent work by your 
staff in the story "The Barter Menace" 
in your August 10 issue. 

I say "rueful'" because we represent 
several clients who would much prefer 
not to have the story in print. And 
my admiration derives from the fact 
that the story is a wonderful example 
of reporting in depth, taking not onl) 
surface phenomena but probing behind 
into causes and motivations, and inter- 
preting phenomena not onlv in the 
light of their historv but in terms of 
their probable future. 

With all. it was beautifully written 
and presented. 

Name withheld at 
request of writer. 

Macy's branch signs 52-week radio 
\» \ ou know. Macy's has stores spread 
across the country, under different 
names. 

In Atlanta, the Macy's is called 
Davison-Paxon's. It is Atlanta's sec- 
ond-largest department store I next to 
66-million dollar annual gross Rich s i . 
Davison-Paxon has just signed a 
firm 52-week contract to use our radio 
station, to promote the store. 

Since Davison's is a division of "The 
\\ orld's Largest Store." we think that 
this sale is newsworthy to the radio in- 
dustry. We hope that you do. too. 

George R. 01i\ iere 
executive director 
WGST. Atlanta 

Television case history 

During his visit to Australia. Bob Salk 

of Screen Gems mentioned to me that 



SPONSOR • 21 SEPTEMBER 1957 



.in article was published in sponsor 
-(Pint- (> in In months ago which would 
he of great interest to us here in 
Australia. 

I he article referred to case histories 
■ I I! .uicl \l Beans and if \ ou can ad- 
vise nf the date this article appeared, 
we could have it checked through oui 
own library oi Sponsor publications. 
\m other materia] or reference in 
this regard will certainlj be mosl ap- 
preciated bj u- here in Australia in 
regard t" telei ision. 

Main Woolf, 
Managing Director, 
Goldberg tdvertising, 
Sydney 

• SPONSOR continual lo K <-i laqoirlea regard- 

inn llii. -,-ri.-- •. Iii.-li followed x aok-bj -~ . . ik 

ri-ull- of .1 t> |,»i , .,„,,, ,,_,, 

Tv Radio Basics reprints 

Vgain I would like to express m\ 
appreciation for Part 2 of sponsor's 
llili annual TV Radio Basics, a- pub- 
lished Julj 27. L957. 

I have been affiliated with the broad- 
casting industry for main \ears ami 
I believe, as a sales aid, the informa- 
tion contained in \our publication is 
the finest available. I would like to 
congratulate you and your staff on the 
service \ou render to the broadcasting 
industry . 

During the past year I distributed 
more than 150 copies of Radio Ban< ■-. 
and would like to again distribute these 
to clients and agencies in our area. 

Gaines Ulen, sates manager. 

WEZB, 

Birmingham. I la. 

• Reprints of Radio H.i-i.-- a r.- available. Thr 
price i- SSc per reprlnl *itli quantitj price in- 

formaiion on reqneat. Film Baaiei and li It. 

are aUo available in reprint form, tiddreaa re- 
qnesta i« : SPONSOR Service*, In... to K. 1<M, 
>l.. N.v. 'ii.rk IT. VV 



News gets around 

I want to express m\ thank- for the 
write-ups in the 27 July issue (TV and 
Radio Newsmakers i ... I have heard 
from main people that the\ saw the 
article, but I knew long before thai 
of the continued and growing success 

of SPONSOR. 

SPONSOR continues to be outstand- 
ing good and. if possible, seems to 
improve all the time. I am sure the 
industry is most appreciative of the 
outstanding job that \ ou are doing and 
you know that I wish you everj con- 
tinued success. 

Jerry Glynn. 

Midwestern manager. 

AM Radio Sales. Chicago. Mieh. 



SPONSOR • 21 SEPTEMBER 1957 





\ // 



BEST IN THE FIELD 



The "joy" in our own "mudville" knows 
no bounds — performance and 

showmanship have clinched us a 
pennant in the ratings league! We've 
got the No. 1 spot morning, noon and 

all-night — so we suggest you offer 
South Texans the products they prefer 
on the station they have favored for years! 
See your H - R representative or 
Clarke Brown man. 

» 

860 kc 5000 watts 



SAN ANTONIO 



Radio 



25 



I 







I hirty yea of Amei 

loved corned} teai ■ ■ ■ N" ANDY 

are bigger and better than ever in their 
fun-packed syndicated series Stripped acn 
the board, the 78 half-hours are ing 

large daytirru audiences in Buch major i 
as N»'\\ York, Philadelphia, Springfield I Ma 
Washington, D.C. and Provi< Vndin 

Ball imore, the show Is coi op- 

rated multi-weekly shovi i lir. AMOS'N' 

A X I )V rate high with nighttirm vie 
in a wide variety of markets : Detroit itj . 
Jackson, Miss. (34.8), Joplin, Mo. 30.0 and 
Mobile (25.7). Naturally AMOS'N' ANDY i • 
advert i sers' favorites as well .. . Food Fair • now 
in its third year of continuous sponsorship 
National Home Furnishers, Brown & Halt 
Candy. Fidelity Federal vV Security Lii 
< insurance I and Kroger V^mi Si 
a few. For hats-off results in your area, buy... 




OCBSTELEVISION FILM SALES.INC 



Offio 

•na. In Canada I well, Ltd. 

5 



0) 

6 - 

T3 "3 

£ o 

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REPRESENTED BY CBS RAOIO SPOT SALES 



. 






News and views for women in 
advertising and wives of admen 



Women's week 



How to value your nest egg: That's a problem which faces the 
wives of top agency management executives once their hushands 
approach retirement age. It's become proverbial over the \ears that 
main admen live right up to their incomes; meanwhile, their wives 
are sometimes lulled into a sense of false security because of the 
stock options top executives at agencies usually own toda\. 

"Many wives don't realize that agency stock is not on a par with 
industry stock," says agency consultant Boh Durham. "The wife 
of a president of a $5 million to SI*) million agency figures her hus- 
band is worth some $200,000 to $300,000 in stock, but when it comes 
to liquidating, that's a different story. Agency assets, unlike those 
of industry, are highly ethereal. A good agency name is worth only 
as much as the accounts in the shop and the talent on the payroll. 

Financial men give this advice : 

1. Maintain a cash reserve (or industrial stocks rapidlv convert- 
able into cash) that can carry the family for six months if the man 
is under 45; for a year, if he's over that age. 

2. Continuously increase life insurance coverage despite rising 
premiums as age increases. It becomes harder to cut your standard 
of living as you gain prominence in an industry. 

3. Don't rely on agency stock options as your only investment. 
Any banker knows you must hedge a bet. 

Lady food executive: The "conservative South" has shown the 
effects of the trend toward more women executives in major industry 
with the appointment of Heloise Parker Broeg as director of the 
newlv former Consumer Service Department of the Coastal Foods 
Co., Cambridge, Maryland. 

As "Mother Parker" of WEEI Food Fair. Heloise Broeg has broad- 
cast a daily women's show over WEEI, Boston, for the past 16 years. 
She also had one of the first "cooking" shows on WCBS-TV when 
television became commercial. 

In her new position. Heloise will help acquaint consumers with 
various lines of Coastal Foods Co. products through all media. 

What's a "typical client?" In a current survey, the American 
Management Association describes the "typical" company president 
this wax : 

". . . an energetic man who works 10 or 15 hours beyond his com- 
pany's normal work week, spends six or seven weeks a year traveling 
on business, and has a hard time finding enough hours for his wife 
and two or three children, golf, reading and communih service. He 
is about 50 years old, earns an average of $68,000 a \ear. owns his 
own home and two or more cars." 

AMA produced this picture by surveying 335 member company 
presidents, heading firms with sales ranging from $1 million to sev- 
eral billion dollars a \ear: average sales were $65 million in 1955. 
Their incomes varied between $13,500 to over $400,000 a year, gen- 
erally in proportion to compain sales. GeographicalK . the surve) 
covered cities in and small towns in six countries and 40 L . S. states 



SPONMIK 



21 SEPTEMBER 1957 






Pittsburgh's A/BIY£^T Look 

WHO 

CHANNEL 11 

Now On the Air 



316,000 watts ERP 

serving 

1,237,000 TV Horn 

in the nation's 
EIGHTH MARKET 

with effective buying income of 
$8,731,815,000 



REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY 



BLAIR TV 




BASIC 



□% 



AFFILIATE 



SPONSOR • 21 SEPTEMBER 1957 



29 




WBTV's proven sales power finds its firm 
foundation in audience domination. The 
remarkable extent of that domination has 
just been measured. 

In ARB's brand new total area report of 
television viewing in the 80 counties served 
by both Charlotte stations * 

• WBTV WINS 442 OUT OF 465 QUARTER- 
HOURS SURVEYED 

• WBTV'S AVERAGE SHARE OF AUDIENCE 
FOR THE ENTIRE PERIOD IS 79.3% 

• THE TOP 53 MOST POPULAR SHOWS ARE 
ON WBTV 

WBTV's dominance is durable. Ask your 
WBTV or CBS-TV Spot Salesman to show 
you the complete ARB Total Area Report. 

"The Charlotte Total Coverage Area 
ARB— June 25— July 1, 1957 




CUi 




WVv 



Jefferson Standard Broadcasting Company 



SPONSOR 

2 ' bl i l»S7 



HARRINGTON-RICHARDS 



DON KEMPER 



IRWIN VLADIMIR 



FULLER, SMITH & ROSS 



DONAHUE & COE 



CUNNINGHAM & WALSH 



ERWIN, WASEY 



I MORGAN 
IGOODKIND, JAM 



GOTHAM 



ROBERT ORR 



GROSSMAN AGENCY 



BRISACHER. WHEELER 



IrUTHRAUFF A RYAN 



IS TV BEHIND 

THE URGE TO MERGE? 

High cost of agencj t\ departments coupled with t\ demands for 
marketing and research >vill stimulate more link-up* among 
medium-sized and small agencies before end <>l h spring season 



i 



f this year doesn't go down .1- the bighpoinl 
for agenc) mergers, then next year should. 
Literal!) dozens of mergers are now being con- 
sidered b) agencies around the nation. 
will take months to consummate (even years 
Other- will die after the first meetings. 

But the merger fever i- in the air and tele- 
vision is a major factor it n<>t the big factor. 

Television however, is, unlikerj to !>•■ tagged 
openl) as t h«- reason for a mergei aftei the fact 
Traditionally agencies prefer t" talk over-all 



strateg] instead "I pinning themselves 
one medium no matter how dominant. 

eed from 
the link-up of operations billing well und< 
million jointl) \<> the n 
bining R&R and Em in. W 
iOion total. 
Vhnost ever} week now brings anothei d 
soli( itation for a mei - - top 

man.]. if not as the solution l>> a current 

problem then is ssibilit) f>>r further growth 



M'n\SOR 



21 SEPTEMBER 195*3 



31 



Many of the current agency mergers 

provide new regional offices for large agencies. 

The result: Spot buying can be localized 



ami strength i<>r their operation. 
Sometimes the requirements of the t\ 

era have been apparent on the surface; 
other times they're submerged. But 
here's whj main top agency executives 
consider tv a stimulus for main recenl 
mergers and for mergers predicted for 
the next few years: 

1. Television dictates bigness. 
It tends to favor both the large-budget 
advertiser and the large agency because 
of the size of initial tv investments and 
the enormous cost to the agenc\ of 
handling t\ lulling. 

Its becoming harder for a moderate- 
size agency to staff a complete tv de- 
partment. Above all. the smaller agencv 
has difficulty attracting the caliber of 



man to head up its t\ operation who 
can handle top-level programing nego- 
tiations. 

2. More than with other media, 
agency bigness tends to give a 
bargaining leverage in network 
negotiations. The agency with con- 
trol of a "top 10" show will get a 
warmer reception from networks than 
an agency without such an ace up its 
sleeve. 

Then. too. control of a lot of net- 
work business will help an agency 
amortize the cost of high-salaried talent 
in its tv department. The tv head of a 
S50 million agency is likely to be as 
competent and well-paid as the tv v.p. 
of a $150 million a»enc\ : but he's 



IIIIIIIIIIIEIIII 



HOW TV ENCOURAGES MERGERS 



Tv accounts require many high-salaried tv specialist? -within 
the agency. A top agency tv head may earn more than the princi- 
pals in a moderate-size shop, causing difficulty for smaller agency to 
staff adequately for tv clients. Also, smaller agencies have difficulty 
in attracting the caliber department head to do network negotiating. 

Big tv billings tend to give agencies a bargaining leverage 
both in network and programing negotiations. Hence, the more top 
network shows an agency has, the better it can attract and repre- 
sent other tv accounts in network buys. Besides, it's network billing 
that tend- to amortize cost of operating expensive tv department-. 

Spot tv requires extensive local servicing. Many agencies find 
that they should have men in key areas, rather than buying out of 
one city alone. This need for regional offices to arrange good 
schedules and merchandising follow-through with better station con- 
tact is prompting mergers of big agencies with small local shops. 

Tv clients make more demands for such collateral services as 
marketing, merchandising and research, but the small operation 
finds these too costly to maintain on staff. The smaller the agency, 
the bigger the percentage of billing that goes into services. Tv has 
increased cost of non-creative departments like accounting as well. 

Big national budgets anil tougher sale- climate has pushed 
agencies into developing stronger tie-in with client sale- force. 
distributors and local dealer-. To maintain this contact on day-to- 
day basis, many big agencies have opened new regional office-. Set- 
ting up office- can be more costly, time-consuming than merger-. 



1IIIIIIIIUI!!IIIII!II:: 



32 



costing the smaller agencv a larger 
percentage of billings and profits. 

3. Spot tv is a medium de- 
manding local care and servicing. 

The amounts of advertiser dollars pour- 
ing into stations on a spot basis are so 
sizable that the agency cannot gamble. 
There's need for detailed market and 
audience knowledge and close contact 
between buyer and station management 
for top scheduling and good merchan- 
dising follow-through. 

This has been a factor in stimulating 
the opening of more regional agency 
offices. Says Robert Durham, a "mer- 
ger doctor" who has had such top-level 
positions as head of K&E's new busi- 
ness department: 

"A national tv account naturally 
wants New l ork and Los Angeles rep- 
resentation. You can't buy network tv 
sitting in Milwaukee. But. if you're a 
national agency, you need regional 
shops for carrying through effective 
spot tv campaigns." 

There are several examples of recent 
mergers where the matter of a regional 
office was a prime consideration. As 
Jack Cunningham, president of Cun- 
ningham & Walsh, puts it (referring to 
the agency's December 1956 merger 
with Brisacher. Wheeler & Staff. San 
Francisco I : 

"The consolidation was the result of 
an entirely new plan of agency opera- 
tion designed to meet the changing de- 
mands that advertisers are placing on 
agencies. Advertisers are requiring 
from agencies a country-wide knowl- 
edge of local and regional marketing 
and cross-country ability to provide the 
client with all important agencv ser- 
vices." 

4. Tv clients* demands for 
more and more collateral services 
are raising agency cost of operation 
to the straining point, particularly for 
the smaller shop. John Orr Young, 
retired co-founder of Y&R, who is a 
prominent merger consultant, sees this 
trend as a predominant merger cause. 

"The high cost of non-creative func- 
tions.'" he told SPONSOR, "is putting 
the squeeze on smaller agencies. But 
to compete in handling national ac- 
counts they must provide marketing 
and research and merchandising. Ob- 
viously if the small agency can get 
bigger, a smaller percentage of its dol- 
lars will go into both collateral sen it es 
and non-creative departments." 

The so-called non-creative depart- 
ments that have had to increase in size 



SPONSOR • 21 SEPTEMBER 1957 







and costliness because "I television in 
■ lude accounting and billing. Certainly, 
spot tv is .1 complicated and costly 
medium foi an agenc) t<> handle from 
this point "I v iew . \ « I « 1 to this ac- 
counting and billing problem the in- 
evitable ta-k of policing SAG reuse 
|i.i\ tnents for talent in commercials and 
it becomes obvious that tv has in- 
creased an agency's overhead appre- 
• iablj . 

.">. Today's competitive mar- 
kets require more in-depth *<-i\- 
Icing from .m agency l>i>tli in terms 
of contact with the client's national 
advertising management and in direct 
contact with the client's sales force, 
trade, local and regional distributors. 

Since tlii- contact needs to be con- 
tinuous to be effective, few agencies 
are willing to do it simply l>\ sending 
men out from New V ork. Instead, 
more and more of the large agencies 
are maintaining regional offices in key 
cities. 

I he setting up ol such a regional 
office is a time-consuming and very ex- 
pensive proposition. Instead of doing 
this, main an agency has merged with 
an agency in the citj where it wanted 

representation. Bv the same token, the 
small local agency in that city gains 
all the advantages of being able to 
offer services only a large shop can 
offer, a- well as good New York repre- 
sentation for buying actional radio. 



1 1 ii- 1 1' are factors be) ond the influ- 
ence of t\ and cost "I collateral Ben 
ii es that have I een behind met ;ei - 

the t.i\ -ll UCtUre foi one. 

" Agencies billing between v i mil- 
lion and $20 million all ovei the coun 
ii\ often have this problem, says 
Robert Durham. 'Tne one 01 two men 
who built the agencj worry about re 
tirement. Then wives think they're 
worth several hundred thousand dol 
lars, I'nt it a papei stock in 1 1> ■ 
agency. One oi the ways to liquidate 
this Btock is through a merge] in whi< h 
the agency's stock is acquired foi 
cash. 

Another reason foi mergers is the 
rising cost ol agency growth. I \ en 

il an agenc) net- a $5 million .ii count. 

it will take a \e.n before this client 
heroine- profitable to the agency . In 
the meantime the agencj has to staff 
up with new and high-salaried person- 
nel, most ol whom insist upon stock 
options these days. 

If an agency merges with a v ~> mil- 
lion agency, on the other hand, then ii 
acquires the personnel and talent to 
handle the billing without having to 
go out and try to attract it at a highei 
rate. Since it - becoming increa-inidv 
difficult and e\| ensh e to Inn- top peo- 
ple, mergers are often an answer to 
this combined growth and personnel 
problem. \t the same time, the mergei 
frequent I \ makes it possible to cut 




Merger doctors: 



Prominent agenc) management consult 

like Juliii Orr YoiUfl ' I. > . CO-foundei '"I 

Y&R, and Robi it 1 1 KAh new 

busii ■ miiimii head help 

mergera on top agency level l>v workini 
hind tin -• mi. - I in. I . ..-ils addil 
sen i 



down on top-salary management dupli- 
i ations. 

RM! - Bob W atson, i hairman of the 
board of the newly merged I twin. 
Wasey, Ruthraufi i\ Ryan operation, 
and Dave William-, president of the 
new -hop. both stress that tin- combina- 
tion ol "more i lienl Bei v i. . - in depth 
and a broadei fund of . native talent" 
was tin big reason for theii mergei . 

"We feel ue will -e|\e our clieiit- 

better be< ause we now have more facili- 
ties and a widei range ..i people avail- 

' Please turn i,> /../_. 92 



Biggest agency marriage 



M! .mil Erv\in, Wasej this month, Bob Watson 'I.' as board chnn., Dave William.", pre* 




WHERE SPOT BUYS ARE MADE 



From North, South, East 
and West come the spot tv 
and radio dollars that make 
up this year's $600 million 
pot. The higgest pot ever, 
the same players will likely 
ante up in the same propor- 
tion as they did in 1948 



SRA ana 


lysis of 


1956 spot 


: sources 


Radio and tv 


combined 


New York 


60% 


Chicago 


16% 


St. Louis 


6% 


Los Angeles 


4% 


San Francisco 


4% 


Detroit 


3.5% 


Dallas 


2% 


Boston 


1.5% 


\tlanta 


1% 


Other cities 


2% 



m rom coast-to-coast spot dollars are 
pouring into radio and television at 
the rate of about $600 million annu- 
ally (tv's share is about 2.5 times ra- 
dio's). From what advertising cen- 
ters does this money come? What 
share of the whole does each contrib- 
ute? And has this picture changed 
much in the last decade? 

To answer these questions, sponsor 
surveyed a number of station represen- 
tative firms. From them were obtained 
breakdowns of the percentages of dol- 
lar volume business written during 
1956 in their various branches in both 
radio and tv. Where similar informa- 
tion was available for past years ex- 
tending back to the early days of t\. 
this too was obtained for purposes of 
comparison. 

The individual reports from each rep 
were added together and averaged out 
to strike an industry composite. Then, 
in the case of the 1956 breakdown, this 
was integrated with the recent analysis 
for that same year that was done by 
the Station Representatives Associa- 
tion. 

The results of this industry com- 
posite appear in the accompam in<i 
charts. What trends are pointed up 
by the analysis? 

First, the largest volume of business 
comes from New York, which is not 
surprising inasmuch as that citv has 
recently been called "the front office 
for 95% of the world's business'' 

Chicago, accounting for about one- 
third of New York's placements, comes 
next. San Francisco and Los Angeles, 
although individualK contributing less 
than St. Louis (see SRA analysis chart 
at left), together place about !!' < 
of the national spot business. 

Thus about 87/Y of all radio and t\ 
spot business emanates from New 
^ oik. Chicago. San Francisco and Los 
Angeles. 

This picture of the broadcasting in- 
dustry has not changed substantial!) 



since television appeared on the scene. 
Since 1948. the changes have only in- 
volved a few percentage points up or 
down in the case of any market place. 

The high point percentage that Chi- 
cago showed in 1952 (see large chart) 
might have resulted from the trend in 
the early boom days of tv to move 
some of the New York purchasing 
business out to the Windy Citv. The 
trend was short-lived, however, and 
now Chicago has settled down again 
to doing an average placement a shade 
under what it was placing in 1948. It 
should also be recalled that 1948 was 
the year that Dancer-Fitzgerald-Sample 
moved the buying for two major ac- 
counts (P&G and General Mills) from 
its Chicago headquarters to its New 
York office. 

But all in all. considering tv's im- 
pact in so many quarters, the changes 
in sources of broadcast revenue have 
remained fairly constant. Such buying 
marts as Atlanta, Detroit, St. Louis, 
Seattle, Boston and the rest have regis- 
tered slight ups-and-downs. but these 
could result from clients or agencies 
moving about, or — as might happen in 
Detroit — a big sales push by a single 
industn might up the percentage a 
fraction for that year. 

It is also well to remember that 
while tie percentage total of 13' r be- 
ing disbursed by all those cities other 
than \Y .-Chi.S.F.-L.A. may loom not 
too large, it still represents about $80 
million dollars in spot business this 
year. And. to judge by the chart, these 
other centers are doing more business 
today than in '52 or '48. 

Another fact worth noting is that a 
lot of this mone\ represents some prod- 
uct accounts of considerable size. For 
example, what could well help swell 
Minneapolis' spot dollars is the fact 
that Knox Reeves Advertising in that 
citj handles such products as General 
Mills" \\ heaties and Bisquick. In the 
same way, Gardner Advertising in St. 



SI 



SPONSOR 



21 SEPTEMBER 195'; 















87°o OF. 1 SPOT 


RADIO AND 

New York 


TV DOLLARS COME 

Chicago Los Angeles 


FROM <* BUYING CENTERS 

San Francisco All others 


1956 

$ Volume °o 


60 


19 


4 


4 


13 


1952 


58 


25 


3 


3 


11 



$ Volume % 












1948 

$ Volume % 


62 


22 


4 


4 


8 


1956 


61 


21 


3 


3.5 


11.5 



Tv only % 



1956 

Radio only % 



59 



17 



4.5 14.5 



Industry composite ol when spol radio and spol h dollars come from shows I 

change in the areas ol principal sources Ni ••• V'lk -till disburses the lion's -■ lid in I9tt and in 

1952. I'll i-~ chart was compiled from infoi nation from vai - station repn 

done b\ their branches While ii in no wa). i ints rj spol dollar, it li«h ili< i 



Louis places Purina Chow advertising 
for Ralston Purina Co. \ big -Ii"- of 
farm radio and television business 
comes from j ti~t -in 1 1 < i t it — . 

\n analysis "I the difference per- 
centagewise between placement of ra- 
dio ami t\ business also shows little 
variation in the N.l .-Chi.-S.l .-L. V 
marketplaces. \l»«>ut 2' ! more spot t\ 
is bought in New York than radio. 
\ImuiI V ■ more t\ is bought in ( hi- 
cago. In the \\ esl ( loasl cities, how- 
ever, radio placement has the e Ige 
ovei t\ buying in San Francisco b) 
ah. mi 1 ' , . in Los Angeles bj 2' i . 

\\ hat is the situation of the momenl 
regarding regional disbursement oi 
spot dollar-'.' SPONSOR-SI OP1 I"' 
July 1957 reported that a majoi sta- 
tion rep took inventor) ol bis spot t\ 
business for the first six months, found 
volume off about .'in', of the year be- 
fore. Hi> regional comparisons showed 



the Midwest down about 20 the 
South off slightly. Income from West 
i oast offices also showed a decline at- 
tributed to the strong push mad.- bj 
\M'\ and newspapers in that region. 
Iv business however was up about 
lit , i„ the I ast, and in the West [VB 
was working i" counteract the news- 
papers' push. 

1 > i j t in ■ ombined business, it is i 
sonable to assume hea\ j radio bui 
all summer has more than offset an) h 
softness in thos< 

'III I'd. 

sponsor does not contend that this 
analysis is the final and complete > 
n where spol dollars come from. 

iti"ii on the ative 

figures lor the years 1948 and 
- than current data, the 
cent ssity, built • 

much smaller base. Besides this, the 
whole broad - - s too volatile 



,md d\ namii to « rowd behind do i 
points. 

I ,i n rem •■ \\ ebb 

f S t a I R i ves As* 

1 I. II ill' - In- Ol .Oil/. It 

analysis bj "It should 

pointed out thai all business indii 
foi anj of tl 

that such bus 

ted in that iil\. I 
Station • 

• 
- M - 5l 1 

- handle 

- 
fn>i! | I 

ss both <li 
the general directional 11 liar* 



SPONSOR 



21 SEP! I MBER 1951 



35 



THIS BANK ISN'T AFRAID TO SELL 




Twin City Federal Savings and Loan skyrocketed deposits from $13 
million in 1941 to over $265 million in 1957. The secret: Hard-sell 
promotion on radio and tv with a budget approaching $500,000 



^Larlier this year a Minnesota farmer 
went into a downtown Minneapolis 
savings bank and withdrew $8,000 he 
had deposited a few hours before. He 
explained he had "made a mistake" 
and wanted to open an account at the 
"place Cedric talks about on WCCO."' 

This farmer, and some 95.000 other 
depositors, have proven that a savings 
and loan association can thrive on 
hard-sell promotional advertising on 
radio and television. 

Twin City Federal Savings and Loan 



Association of Minneapolis-St. Paul, 
was established in 1923. From a two- 
room, eighth-floor office it paid a six- 
month total dividend to all depositors 
of $128.86. Today it is one of the 
largest savings banks in the United 
States with two offices and dividends 
this year exceeding $6.8 million. 

Today TCF uses five hours a week 
of programing on radio and two hours 
on television. Three Minneapolis-St. 
Paul tv stations I WCCO-TV. WTCN- 
TV, KSTP-TV) share 44 r ; of a 8500,- 



000 budget: 33' < goes to radio sta- 
tions WCCO. WDGY. WLOL, WTCN 
and KSTP with WCCO radio taking 
the largest slice i 22' ^ of the total I . 

Twin City Federal's radio campaign 
is spearheaded by Cedric Adams, 
WCCO personality: the bank sponsors 
his three daily newscasts twice a week. 

In his TCF commercials Cedric 
urges listeners to "write for full infor- 
mation about opening a savings ac- 
count" at TCF and as a demonstration 
of the confidence a radio personality 




Discussing radio plans, (!■ | " r -' Vance Pidgeon, president, Vance Pidgeon & Associates: Cedric 
Vdams, WCCO Radio personality and Roj W. I.arsen, bank president, meet in Twin City Federal lobby 



36 



SPONSOR • 21 SEPTEMBER 1957 



r*l 



c.in inspire, man) oi his listeners don I 
wail for information but rather Bend 
checks and cash directl) to Cedric 
\dam-. asking him to open their ac- 
count. One listener sent in $10,000 to 
have an accounl opened this way. 

Twin Citv Federal began advertis- 
ing in a significant \ olume in I'M I 
with a total ad budget of 141,000. fo 
da\ the budget is in the neighborhood 
..I 1500,000 with 77' i earmarked foi 
radio and television. This is an ad- 
vertising increase of over 1,000%, hut 
results have warranted it. 

During the same L6-year period, 
Twin City Federal's assets have in- 
creased ahnosl 2,000* - . from $13 mil- 
lion in l'Ml to over $265 million as 
of September 1957. The number of 
-a\ ings ac< ounts is up 5 17' , from 
I I 000 m l'Ml to 95,000 today. 

three differenl agencies have 
bandied I win Cit) Federal's advertis- 
ing since 1941, hut one man has been 
in command all the wav. He is Vance 
Pidgeon, now president of Vance 
Pidgeon & Associates. 

The Hutchinson \gencv of Minne- 
; l>olis was the original, but it was ab- 
sorbed into McCann-Frickson, which 
had the Twin Citv Federal account un- 
til I'M') when the Ml. Minneapolis of- 
fice was closed. Pidgeon. a McCann- 
Erickson vice president ai the time, Bel 
up his own agenc) with Twin Citv 

Federal as one of the top accounts. 

Larsen and Pidgeon agreed early on 
the proper advertising approach Foi 

the hank. Twin Citj Federal's posi- 
tii>n as an important member of the 
community had to be established and 
emphasized. To do this. TCF's adver- 
tising was related to public service. 

Because of the public service theme, 
radio and t\ advertising for TCF rare- 
l\ uses spot announcements in either 
medium, but rather use- five-, 10- or 
L5-minute -hows, usually news, sports 
or weather. These programs afford 
I(.r two commercial messages plus a 
public service identification. 

Ron \\ . Larsen. the president since 
1943, sells Twin City Federal to every- 
one he meet-. "It's hard to come away 
without something in \our hand," one 
friend reports, "he's always got a 
pocketful of gimmicks to hand out." 
This promotional spirit has sparked 
IV.F's air advertising. 

\ good example of Twin Citv Fed- 
erals "pocketful of gimmicks" is the 
"Multiplv vour money" plan, launched 
in 19S() and still emploved frequentlv 
because of the results it brines. 







Checking art work foi rwin • itj Federal television 

Vance Pidgeon consults with Twin Citj Federal's president Roj W I inen and 

!{;>> h.lcy, the agencj ml executive in Lanen'i Minneapolii 




Big 10 conference athletic commissioner Clarence (Tug) Wilson 
interviewed !>\ sportscastei Halsej Hall on WCCO Radio's Footbc R< 

T< K Iki- -|n>n-orrcl tin- ami sister -!>"« t«.r In seasons "l I . "i M. football 



The hank'- advertising tells in con- 
crete terms how to double or triple an 
{■mount of monev In periodic -av ings 
and div idem!-. Cop) point- out for ex- 
ample, that a person can triple $200 
in three years and one month. Here's 
how: Depositor would start with orig- 
inal investment of $200 and each 
month would add $10. \i the end ol 
three years and one month .i- a result 
of the original deposit, month!) addi- 
tion- and div idend- paid hv I ( I the 
total would be $600. 

The plan was simple and could 1 e 

ea-ilv explained on radio and tv . No 

special handling or form- were re- 
quired; it worked right in with a regu- 
lar sav ings account. 

During the first month oi operation 
the "Multiplv vour money" plan in- 
creased Twin Citv Federal's -hare of 



monev placed in all local s 
l< an associations hv 7 

In 1957, for the l'Mh consecutive 
vear, Twin ( itv Federal will sponsor 
/ tball !'"■: ieu and Footl all Rt 
half-hour programs on WCCO, tired 
immediately before and aftei all nine 

I niver-itv of Minim- it i football 

es. 
Radio or television, ne - 
and sports, Tw in ( itv I ederal bas 

well blanketed the Mil i 
St. Paul are ts Twin Citj I 
national leadership, Pres ' Lar- 

sen feels, must be reflected in ad ertis- 
ing ami promotion. Because of this 
thinking TCF has pi< am ra- 

dio and tv shows and is credited with 
helping to -how how hank- can pro- 
as vigorous!) over the air as 
other local-level businesses. ^ 



SPONSOR 



21 SEPTEMBER 1957 



Yl 



CAN YOU TELL YOUR NIELSEN FRONT 

With now shows coming on the game of Trendex-to-Nielsen-to-chance is 
in full swing. SPONSOR'S study shows program category has a definite 
hearing in predicting Nielsens. But don't look for simple formulas 



« 



I" o. Absoluleh not. Its impos- 
sible to make up a formula." 

"Oh. yes. It can he done. It is defi- 
iiiteK possible to come up with a 
prett) accurate estimate." 

The two quotes above are from two 
men talking about —believe it or not — 
the same thin»: whether a Nielsen net- 
work tv rating can be predicted from 
a Trendex rating. 

Probabh ever) researcher in the 
business has tried. And. as the quotes 
above indicate, there's a wide differ- 
ence of opinion about whether it can 
be done. No matter what the opinion. 



however, there is little doubt that the 
game of Trendex-to-Nielsen-to-chance 
is being pla\ed e\er\ <la\ in the week. 

Since, in most cases, the game is 
played very close to the vest, SPONSOR 
decided to have a whirl at it and make 
public the results. 

Here is what SPONSOR'S studv 
showed: 

• Nielsen ratings practicallv always 
differ from Trendex. 

• On the average the Nielsen rat- 
ing was 34' > higher. 

• There were significant differ- 
ences among program types in the 



average amount ol increase. 

• \\ ithin most program types, the 
range of increase (or decrease, in 
rare cases I was substantial enough to 
suggest that I 1 i oversimplified formu- 
las are dangerous and ( 2 I special situ- 
ations must be taken into account in 
predicting what a Nielsen will be. 

In the study sponsor compared the 
ratings of 112 nighttime tv network 
shows. Their ratings appeared in the 
Trendex report for the week ending 
7 December 1956 and the Nielsen re- 
port for the two weeks ending 8 De- 
cember. Average per minute audience 









Percent by which Nielsen rating is higher than Trendex varies by program ty I 



■UU1JIUUUUW 

SHOW 


Trendex 


Nielsen 


% Increase 


Greatest rating increase: 
Ford Theatre 


10.3 


18.9 


83% 


Average : 


16.7 


22.3 


34% 


Smallest rating increase: 
Robert Montgomery 


1 7.3 


14.8 


17% 



9 MYSTERY SHOWS 


SHOW 


Trendex 


Nielsen 


°o Increase 


Greatest rating increase: 
Alfred Hitchcock 


28.4 


37.5 


32% 


Average: 


20.4 


25.1 


23% 


Smallest rating increase: 
The Vise & 
Big Story 


8.2 
L7.4 


9.6 
20.3 


17% 

17°j 



SHOW 


Trendex 


Nielsen 


°o Increase 


Greatest rating increase: 
Hey Jeannie 


12.0 


26.1 


118% 


\\ erage : 


16.6 


25. 1 


53% 


Smallest rating increase: 
1 Love Lucy 


35.7 


16.3 


30% 



SHOW 


Trendex 


Nielsen 


° Increas 


Greatest rating increase : 
Ozark Jubilee 


1.7 


9.5 


102°< 


Average: 


17.6 


22.0 


25 ° ( 


Smallest rating increase: 
Walter Winchell 


17.6 


16.9 


44 



1 which Nielsen rating! in hlgtaei than T i« Minus sign shows percenl bj arhicl I tiai Kii iei RatiB» 

G for Niels m nding ' Decembei toi rrendex Show categories are SPONSOR'S 



38 



SPONSOR 



21 SEPTEMBER 1957 



JENDEX? 






ABC's 



CBS 



NBCi 



New shows above 

vnalysia • uwed thai ihe ii 

iM.nk. thos( with ippeal i- • hildri n. tboul 

rating around 50 M . - i i. nded I 






Ggures were used from the Nielsen re 
port i Ml Trendex figures are averagi 
per minute). The Nielsen ratings were 
the two-week averages rather than the 
single week ratings. I'lii- is because 
there arc more ratings available in the 
Nielsen |><>ckct piece on a two-week 
basis and also because a perusal 
showed little difference between t h« ■ 
single week and two-week Nielsen rat- 
ings. Hie difference between the Niel- 
sen and I rendes figures is expressed 
in the percent bj which one rating 
was higher than the other, rather than 
the rating point spread. The data are 



also broken down b) program i \ |» 

Id" t .1 ■ t thai N ielsen i atings an 
almosl invariably different from I i en 
di\ is well-known and easily explained 
[rendex samples telephone homes in 
15 cities with about 26' I oi I .S. h 
homes. Vboul 8 1 ' I ol h homes in 
these cities have telephones. Nielsen 
samples the enl ire 1 .S. h ith electron!) 
metei s. 

I he diffei enl techniques also ai 
count toi some diffei em e in ral ings. 
\lan\ researchers feel the telephone 
coincidental method used l>\ I rendex 
has a bias in la\ n\ ■ >l presl iee pro- 



- m hile the fixed p in< I used bj 
\ ielsen "' < indil ii ins t ru aample l> 
into tuni erns thej m ould nol 

adopt it thej did not d.i v • an \ u ■ 1 1 
metei I hei i is also i certaii > - ounl 
ol -iaii-in al vai iation ine\ itabh 
an) sampling operation. 

l!\ and lai -■• . hovvet ei . rese irch men 
agree thai both sen ii ■ - do the job 
the) set out to within a range " ( 
i urac) ai i eptable to the adt erti? 
business. I he fai i thai \ ieb* n ral 
ings are almosl invariabl) highei thai 
I rendex reflei i-. as the sa) ii 
thai I h«-\ "measure different thin - 



ange between type is wide 



SHOW 



• ilt-l rating increase: 
Sne That Tune 






~ tllest rating increase': 
Tenty-One 



Trendex Nielsen ° Incrcas 



L6.7 



L8.6 



!!!.() 



27.3 



22.i 



14.5 



63 °c 



20 °c 



24% 



* WESTERN SHOWS 

SHOW 


Trcndcx 


Nielsen 


°o Increase 


• atest rating increase: 
V Friend Flicka 


L0.3 


24.3 


136% 


Ajrag 


16.6 


27 2 


64 ° 


Oiliest rating increase: 
Biken Arrow 


20.8 


25.6 


23 % 



SPONSOR • 21 SEPTEMBER 195' 



HOW TRENDEX 

Average all programs 

Program 

Vdventures "til Irani Holiday 
\.l'. entures oi I im Bo* ie 
Vdventures oi * Izzie i\ Harriet 
\n Power 

Ucoa-I rj eai Plaj houst 

Vlfred Hiti hi ock 
\iu.iliiir Hour 
Vrthui Godfrej v li"» 
\riliur ( rodfre] Si outs 

Bi.it The < link 

Big Stor] 

Big Surprisi 

1 1 ■ • 1 1 ( ammings 

Bold Join nej 

Bn ak I he B.mk 

Broken Arrow 

Brothers, The 

Bu< • aneers 

Burns \ Ulen 

I Bl -.h'- I 

i .in Do 

3 
i heyenne 
i in ii- Boj 
I ime 

I --••.. ids 

t rusadei 

Danny Thomas 

I •-•. embei B 

Disne) land 

Do 'i "ii Tru-t Youi 

Dragnet 

I ' punt Theatre 

Sullivan 

nous Film Festival 



AND NIELSEN RATINGS COMPARE 



m;i 


!\ 


\i;i 


r\ 


Mt( 


i \ 


i BS 


n 


m;i 


i\ 


i BS 


i\ 


\B< 


i\ 


i BS 


i\ 


i BS 


i\ 


i BS 


i\ 


\i:i 


i \ 


w;< 


i\ 


> BS 


i\ 


\B< 


i\ 


\r.< 


T\ 


\l;i 


l\ 


i BS 


l\ 


i BS 


l\ 


i BS 


l\ 


\i:< 


l\ 


\B< 


l\ 


m;< 


r\ 


\B< 


i\ 


M'.i 


i\ 


\i:< 


i\ 


i BS 


n 


\Bi 


n 


i BS 


i\ 


KB* 




1 BS 


n 


\i:i 


n 


i BS 


i\ 


\i:< 


T\ 


\i;i 


T\ 


• BS 


TV 


\i;i 


T\ 



Tvp. 

' "Ml 

1 "III. 

I I mi. 

\ls-t. 

\ ,, 

\..r 

Qui] 
Mysl 
Ouii 

I ' urn. 
<.»ui/ 

Quil 

\.K. 

Drama 

Drama 

? 

S 

' 

Quii 

Drama 

Film 



* 

17.K 

19.1 
15.4 

17.4 

"•.7 
10.8 

21.4 
16.7 

II.". 

15.0 

4.1 



• 


Dim 




56 




44 




51 




23 


18.8 


22 




32 


III 


48 




20 




17 




11 




17 




32 




50 




143 


IM 


5 


1 


23 


21 £ 


52 




36 




30 




14 


111 


50 




220 




41 




77 




43 


28.8 


41 


18.7 


46 




43 




49 




50 




42 


21.1 


3°o 


31.8 


21 


n. ( > 


6 


.J8.1 


5°o 




-24 o 



(Continued on next page) 



mi mm in i iiiiii ii iiiii nun mi mum mm in mi mill i m mi mn mm i jj 






Program 


Net 


Trendcx 


Nielsen 


Type 


Difference' 


Fathei Knows Be6l 


\lli T\ 


Sit. ( lorn. 


L5.9 


24.2 


52% 


Ford Show 


\i!t :t\ 


Var. 


19.3 


.50.1 


56% 


| Ford Theatre 


ABC T\ 


Drama 


10.3 


18.9 


63% 


G. 1 ■ . IIh ai re 


CBSTY 


Drama 


26.3 


11.2 


57% 


Gale s i"i mi 


CBS TV 


Sit. Com. 


14.8 


26.7 


80% 


( ., ,,r ge < robe! 


\i:< T\ 


Comedy 


15.9 


22.0 


38% 


| Gianl Step 


CBS TV 


Quiz 


12..? 


16.3 


33% 


( runsmoke 


CBS TV 


West. 


21.5 


32.9 


53% 


Herb Shrinei 


CBST\ 


Var. 


13.6 


20.1 


48% 


Hej Jeannie 


CBS TV 


Sit. Com. 


12.0 


26.1 


118% 


1 1 Love l.m\ 


CBS'IN 


Sit. Com. 


35.7 


46.3 


30% 


It's Polka Time 


ABCTN 


\ ar. 


5.5 


5.4 


-2% 


[Ve Cot A Secret 


CBS T\ 


Quiz 


26.7 


32.8 


23% 


rack Benny 


CBS T\ 


Comedy 


24.1 


32.9 


37% 


Jackie C.leason 


CBS TV 


Var. 


26.5 


32.0 


21% 


1 Jane Wyman 


\i:ct\ 


Drama 


17.0 


23.7 


39% 


1 Jazz Age ( Special I 


M!CT\ 


Spec. 


21.5 


28.2 


31% 


Kaiser Aluminum Hour 


NBC TV 


Drama 


12.3 


15.5 


26% 


| Kraft TV Theatre 


MIC TV 


Drama 


15.3 


19.3 


26% 


1 ,a>-ie 


CBS TV 


Drama 


23.9 


32.4 


36% 


Lawrence Welk 


ABCT\ 


Var. 


24.3 


27.6 


14% 


Lawrence Welk Talent Show 


ABC T\ 


\ ar. 


16.9 


19.9 


18% 


1 Life I9 Worth Living 


ABC TV 


Relig. 


7.1 


6.8 


-4% 


I Life Of Rile) 


NBC TV 


Sit. Com. 


14.9 


21.1 


64% 


I Lineup 


CBS TV 


Myst. 


21.7 


26.5 


22% 


| Lone Ranger 


ABC T\ 


West. 


10.7 


19.9 


86% 


I Loretta Young 


M!CT\ 


Drama 


20.1 


23.1 


15% 


1 Masquerade Party 


ABCT\ 


Quiz 


11.4 


11.8 


4% 


1 Meet the Press 


NBCTN 


Int. 


7.7 


8.7 


13% 


1 Millionaire 


CBS TV 


Drama 


22.4 


31.7 


42% 


\1\ Friend Flicka 


CBS TV 


West. 


10.3 


24.3 


136% 


I Name That Tune 


CBS T\ 


Quiz 


16.7 


27.3 


63% 


1 National Bowling Champs 


NBCT\ 


Sport 


8.8 


9.5 


8% 


| Navy Log 


ABC TV 


Adv. 


15.1 


19.1 


26% 


1 Noah's Ark 


NBC TV 


Drama 


14.6 


17.7 


21% 


S Omnibus 


ABC TV 


Misc. 


5.2 


4.4 


-18% 


| On Trial 


NBC TV 


Drama 


12.2 


16.5 


35% 


| Ozark Jubilee 


ABC TV 


Var. 


4.7 


9.5 


102% 


1 People Are Funny 


NBC TV 


Misc. 


24.1 


32.8 


36% 


| Peoples Choice 


NBC TV 


Sit. Com. 


17.9 


23.5 


31% 


1 Perry Como 


NBC TV 


Var. 


23.8 


33.4 


40% 


1 Person to Person 


CBS TV 


Int. 


29.9 


23.7 


-26% 


1 Phil Silvers 


CBS TV 


Sit. Com. 


16.8 


29.7 


77% 


| Playhouse 90 


CBS TV 


Drama 


16.7 


22.4 


34% 


I Press Conference 


ABC TV 


Int. 


2.6 


2.7 


4% 


1 Ray Anthony 


ABC TV 


Var. 


4.0 


6.2 


56% 


1 Red Skelton 


CBS TV 


Comedy 


25.9 


30.9 


19% 


I Rin Tin Tin 


ABC TV 


West. 


17.4 


28.7 


65% 


I Robin Hood 


CBS TV 


Adv. 


23.8 


32.1 


35% 


| Robert Montgomery 


NBC TV 


Drama 


17.3 


14.8 


-17% 


I Roy Rogers 


NBC TV 


West. 


10.2 


21.0 


106% 


1 Schlitz Playhouse 


CBS TV 


Drama 


18.9 


25.0 


32% 


1 Sgt. Preston 


CBS TV 


Adv. 


15.6 


25.2 


62% 


I 77th Bengal Lancers 


NBC TV 


Adv. 


9.1 


15.1 


66% 


I Sir Lancelot 


NBC TV 


Adv. 


12.9 


19.4 


50% 


1 $64,000 Challenge 


CBS TV 


Quiz 


25.7 


32.1 


25% 


1 $64,000 Question 


CBS TV 


Quiz 


28.6 


36.3 


27 % 


1 Stanley 


NBC TV 


Sit. Com. 


11.8 


20.2 


77% 


1 Steve Allen 


NBC TV 


Var. 


18.4 


29.1 


58% 


| Studio One 


CBS. TV 


Drama 


15.4 


21.0 


36% 


i This Is Your Life 


NBC TV 


Misc. 


21.0 


26.8 


28% 


1 Treasure Hunt 


ABC TV 


Quiz 


13.0 


17.3 


13% 


1 Twenty-one 


NBC TV 


Quiz 


18.0 


14.5 


-24% 


1 U. S. Steel Hour 


CBS TV 


Drama 


16.9 


21.6 


28% 


1 Vise, The 


ABC TV 


Myst. 


8.2 


9.6 


17% 


\ oice of Firestone 


ABC T\ 


Music 


5.4 


9.4 


74% 


1 Walter Winchell 


NBC TV 


Var. 


17.6 


16.9 


-4% 


|Wed. Night Fights 


ABC T\ 


Sport 


13.4 


17.2 


28% 


I West Point 


CBS TV 


Adv. 


13.6 


22.2 


63% 


1 What's My Line? 


CBS TV 


Quiz 


27.3 


31.4 


15% 


| Wire Service 


ABC TV 


Drama 


8.6 


13.8 


60% 


| Wyatt Earp 


ABC T\ 


West. 


22.6 


31.8 


41 % 


You Asked For It 


ABC TV 


Misc. 


10.5 


13.8 


31% 


1 You Bet Your Life 


NBCTN 


Quiz 


27.9 


31.1 


11% 


I Your Hit Parade 


NBC TV 


Var. 


25.6 


28.7 


12% 


| Zane Grey Theatre 


CBS TV 


West. 


15.5 


27.3 


76% 



1 by which Nielsen rating Is higher than Trended. Where there i- ■ minus sign, this shows the percent | 
1 1 lei Is higher than Nielsen. Nielsen ratings are a two week average for the period eniiint 8 
December 19T>ti. Trendex ratings cover the week ending 7 December. Show categories are SrONSOR's. List = 
J comprises 112 nighttime network tv programs. 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimmiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiimmmiiiiiimimmmmiiiimm 



Trendex cities were chosen because 
all three tv networks have full-time out- 
lets there. Ed Hvnes, Trendex presi- 
dent, estimates that his service covers 
90' '( of those tv homes which can re- 
ceive shows from all three networks 
on the dav of origination. There are, 
of course, additional homes which can 
receive all three networks but, in some 
cases, these homes see telecasts which 
had originated on a different dav. 
Thus, Trendex ratings disclose how a 
program is doing against its competi- 
tion. And since network competition 
for the country as a whole is not as 
tough as in the 15 cities, Nielsen na- 
tional ratings tend to be higher. 
Trendex figures also tend to reflect 
urban program likes and dislikes, ap- 
parently the major reason for the dif- 
ferences in rating increases among dif- 
ferent program categories. 

Because of the variation in the rat- 
ing increase the average shown for all 
programs is not particularly useful in- 
sofar as predicting what a particular 
show will do. Even within a program 
categorv the average for that category 
must be used with care. For example, 
in the drama categorv the range varied 
from a Nielsen 17 r < below the Tren- 
dex to a Nielsen 83% above. How- 
ever, a study of the live hour dramas 
showed that, with one exception, the 
increases tended to cluster together. 
Similarly, in the western category, 
those shows with particular appeal to 
children increased more than the so- 
called adult westerns. The mystery 
categorv showed the greatest consist- 
ency in the percent of increase of indi- 
vidual shows. 

Though Nielsen and Trendex differ 
in program rating levels, program 
trends appear to run parallel, most 
researchers agree. As a matter of 
fact, one Trendex-Nielsen study done 
last year by Bryan Houston found 
that the rating spread for a number of 
shows ran pretty constant. For exam- 
ple, a rating comparison over nine 
months for Oh. Susannah showed that 
the Nielsen was consistentlv about 10 
rating points higher than the Trendex. 
A similar storv was uncovered with 
Caesar's Hour. Like sponsor, the 
agencv researchers found the pattern 
of rating increases was made clearer 
bv breaking the figures down by pro- 
gram tvpe. It is significant that the 
average rating spread for situation 
(Please turn to page 46) 




SPONSOR 



21 SEPTEMBER 1957 



HEY K/DS K T M/SS 

"UNCLE HUGO' 

IN P£RSONlN Th STORE 
FRIDAY *t 

FREE Gtfl y and o 





Not merchandising: fbis i- a traffic-building promotion; it doesn't aecessaril) move -<»ii|-. i- not merdi ;tn.n 



WHAT IS MERCHANDISING? 




Carl H. Vogr, who wrote tin- re- 
port on merchandising, knows the 
retail level. He Started in retailing, 
for nian\ yar- »a- a Mike— on & 
Robbins salesman. He's now mer- 
chandising manager of stations 
WISN, WISN-T\ in Milwaukee 



You have no yardstick for measuring station performance — 
unless you are sure you know what the word merchandising 
means. Sometimes it's easier to sa> what merchandising isn'l 



"Dear Sir: 
!■• \oii no doubt know, we have 

a schedule running on \our sta- 
tion for — — . ff e would ap- 
preciate any merchandising 

help you uill give ... 

1 o station men this is an all too 
familiar prototype. I he\ also "no 
doubt know" that tin- "suggested list 
uill contain what Ha- come to be an 
almost standard group of "merchandis- 



ing' 1 and promotion.il a< ti\ itii - 

o\ which will cost more- than the 

"schedule running on youi station. 

I o idvertising men this n 
nebulous activity known a- merchan- 

dising. It ha- onlj been in the last ten 
war- that this word has been added to 
the lexit on ,.f advertising agent iea and 

it tna\ he well to throw in a hit of 
clarification of the subject Men-han- 
dising i- well on its wa\ to becoming 
one of the most abused and :u»nnder- 



SPONSOR 



21 SEPTEMBER 195' 



41 



STATION MERCHANDISING continued 

I*" 




This is merchandising: getting client favorable end display which tends to 
increase sales; or setting up product sampling booth and supplying demonstrator 
represents real merchandising, Carl \ ogt explain* in text. Pictures show merchan- 
dising t >> WISN. Call letters are absent unle>- there's a shew to tie-in with 




-torn) words in the advertising indus- 
try. 

Rightly or wrongly, the function of 
merchandising has come to be regard- 
ed as a burden which must be borne. 
It's considered an expensive load by 
station executives who sometimes feel 
as if they were watching their profits 
melt away in dribblets of ineffective 
nothingness. It's considered a bother- 
some annoyance by agency personnel 
who sometimes feel that their life 
would be much simpler if they didn't 
have to cope with what often is a 
smokescreen of verbiage anent mer- 
chandising thrown up to hide poor per- 
formance in a stations basic medium. 

As is so often the case, the happy 
truth lies somewhere around the mid- 
point of these exasperating extremes. 
Merchandising is a necessary activity 
of all who would sell goods in todays 
marketplace. Stations. 1>\ reason of 
their peculiar abilities, are often in a 
position to render a service in this field 
that an advertiser's own representatives 
are unable to accomplish. 

It is possible for a station to engage 
profitably in an effective merchandis- 
ing program without an onerous bur- 
den of expense. It is also compara- 
tively simple for an advertising agenc) 
to separate "the wheat from the chaff'* 
merchandising presentations are 
involved. It is necessarv. however, that 



both stations and agencies maintain an 
understanding of the true definition of 
merchandising and apply it as a yard- 
stick for measuring performance. 

First of all. we must know what mer- 
chandising means. In practice, as mer- 
chandising programs have normallv 
been set up by broadcasting stations, 
the activity has usually been consid- 
ered to be a promotional function: 
consequently, the tendency has been to 
regard even action taken in its rela- 
tion to station promotion rather than 
to the needs of the advertiser, and a 
bundle of pretty photographs and 
colorful jumbo postcards substitute in 
many cases for solid accomplishment. 

This emphasis is wrong. Function- 
ally, promotion's purpose is the crea- 
tion of impressions. It may or mav 
not have am direct bearing upon re- 
tail sales. 

Merchandising has a different slant. 
It has as its primary purpose the move- 
ment of goods, usually at the retail 
level. 

W e can illustrate. Not too long ago. 
WISN -TV's Uncle Hugo made an ap- 
pearance in an area super market on 
behalf of General Food's Post Cereals. 
Over a thousand youngsters appeared; 
traffic was jammed: the local newspa- 
per sent a photographer: the joint was 
literal l\ jumping: and it took the mer- 
chant quite some time to work off the 



excess inventory he had purchased to 
build his displays. 

This was good promotion. It intro- 
duced housewives to the store who had 
never been there before and enhanced 
Post Cereal's standing with both con- 
sumers and the retailer. The purpose 
of creating impressions was accom- 
plished. 

For General Foods' Instant Maxwell 
House, we set up four demonstration 
and sampling promotions in as many 
super markets. Overflow crowds were 
not in evidence: no traffic jam oc- 
curred: no photographer appeared 
from the local paper: vet as many 
cases of merchandise were sold at re- 
tail in each outlet as had been pur- 
chased by the single merchant for 
I nele Hugo's appearance. 

This was good merchandising. New 
customer who had not previously tried 
instant coffee purchased it. The reali- 
zation of the market potential was 
brought a little closer. The purpose of 
effecting the movement of goods at the 
retail level was accomplished. In com- 
parison, the costs of these two event- 
were approximately the same! 

With this difference in mind it 
should not be difficult for stations to 
huild. and advertising agencies to 
judge, a merchandising program. Let's 
examine the conditions which must be 
fulfilled by an adequate attempt 



42 



SPONSOR 



21 SKPTKMBER 1957 



I irst, we r 1 1 1 1 - 1 examine .ill plans in 
the lighl ni the purpose to ring the 
caafa registers "I the markel in favoi oi 
advertisers. \\ e tnual a< cepl the fa< i 
thai this i- .1 plodding, pavement 
pounding soi i oi job, .1- contrasted t" 
the inconglomerate mass oi stunts and 
whingdings thai normall) | » ^ 1 —— foi 
merchandising. 

Nation- musl be prepared to accom- 
plish the maximum possible results 
consistent with good business practice 
for theii advertisers. Ml musl be 
treated proportionately. The) must 
also control costs. Commercial broad- 
casting stations are nol among those 
"i ganizations thai can claim to be al- 
truistic. 

\\ li ■ 1«- on this Bubjecl oi cost, ii 
mi-lii be well tn note thai the value ol 
time traded out For displays and other 
cooperation must !>«■ included in all 
calculations, li must be remembered 
that the commodity which broadcasters 
have to sell i> time. Time has .1 value 
to them the same as a physical inven- 
tor) has a value to an advertiser. Jusl 
as a merchant 11-e- sales and special 
I" ii es t" move merchandise, >o sta- 
timi- use "package plans" to move 
their unsold "inventory" of time. 

Next, clients must It classified. It is 
obvious that the same assistance which 
is rendered a 52 week program adver- 
tise] w ill be much 1 :ostl) to accord 

to a once a week i n-and-i niter. 

hue merchandising is an expensive 
operation; therefore, stations find that 
the) must sta) in the realm of promo- 
tion for the small advertiser. This 
mean- jumbo postcards or some equal- 
ly economical method of informing the 

trade of the advertising schedule. 

riu-e mailings have a wa) of piling 
up mi the retailer: so some stations 
find that a monthl) newsletter or an 
advertisement in the merchant""- organ- 
ization's own publication i- more ef- 
fective and gets more reader-hip than 
the individual mailing piece which 
Boon becomes "one of a crowd." 

Tor the buyers of large and 01 con- 
sistent spot schedule-, a heav) satura- 
tion campaign, or a program it be- 
comes economicall) feasible for a sta- 
tion to extend true merchandising help. 
\\ hat this help consists of depends 
upon a considerable number of factors: 
type of business, -tale of distribution, 
standing with retailer- of both adver- 
tiser and station, advertising expendi- 
ture, to name hut a feu. 

Here is where station- OCCUp) a pe- 

1 Please turn page 1 



SPONSOR 



21 SEPTEMBER I95"i 



CAN RADIO ATTRACT A LIVE 
AUDIENCE IN A HURRY? 



I 



adio iu-i .1 thingamajig that's tun.. I in becausi ii - there 
01 w ill people ii "I theii wa) i" enjo) it ' 

Evidence thai tin- lattei i- the case was provided recentl) bj 
\\ I IV Mew Orleans, which pulled I". it- "Radio Appre- 
ciation Might" ii Pontchartrain Beach Vmusemenl Park. 

I lie Storz-operated outlet blended .1 short, hut punchy, pro- 
motion campaign with well-known, I i \. • r< ling talent i" 

bring out tin- crowd. I In- W II \ -how wa- prei eded b) a week 
of on-theaii teasers followed !>\ a week •■! straight promotion, 
graduated in impact but fairl) heav) throughout. Result: one 
ol the largest nighttime crowds evei .it the park \\ I I \ esti- 
mates it cost tin- station, at tin- straight 1 aid rate less than nine 
cent- a head to attract tin- audience, a price tin- station feels i- 
a bargain considering the amount of exposure i" tin station's 
call lettei - 

Besides on-the-aii promotion, promotional ^immiik- in- 
clude: 1 I 1 broadcasting of the '/"/' In Shou remote from the 
beach, >2> buying out all the amusement rides between 1:00 
and 7:00 p.m. and offering them free to the public, (3) giving 
awa\ nearl) I. nun records, ' I' hiring models t" weai W ll\ 
streamer- and hand mil station promotion. 

I In- main event, which took place on 22 August, wa- pre- 
ceded b) a 20-minute lot featuring tin- orchestra and II 

-how from a local night club. Vftei a 100-minute break, the 
big -how went on at 9:30 p.m. 

Each of tlie recording acts wa- introduced b) a \\ I I \ per- 
sonality, each "I whom had a -mall ad nf hi- own. Highlight- 
ing tin- lineup of recording stars were tin- Everl) Brothers; 
others were < huck Miller, Martha Lou Harp, Joel Grey, < •• 
Hamilton, fomrm Leonetti, lerri Vdams. Bonnie Guitar. ^ 




Recording stars, beavj on-the-air promol ■ 

publicity gimmicks attracted 10.000 t" "Radio Vppreciatinn 

show staged b) W I l\ \; • \ 



13 



MERCHANDISING 

(Continued from page 13) 

culiarl) effective position, one ac- 
corded them b\ the natural contacts 
which the) can uain and maintain with 
retailers. In calling on chains, the ad- 
vertise] s representative is often unable 
to contact the sales and supervisory 
personnel; hut it is here that final de- 
i ision is made regarding items to be 
featured and promotions to be run. 
Stations have these persons as their 
normal contacts. It is not hard to see 
how a station which has developed 



close retailer contacts is a valuable ally. 

Chain display offers are good mer- 
chandising. The most effective step 
that can be taken to increase sales in 
todays self-service marketplace is the 
improvement of display size and loca- 
tion of an advertiser's wares in retail 
outlets. Exchange facility agreements 
can handle this very nicely. 

But merchandising experience is es- 
sential. All too often chain display 
contracts are neither properlv made 
nor effectively administered. \\ itli 
merchandising personnel now handling 
our contracts at WISN AM-TV, all re- 



£ 



fk£ 






J*md 



S© C f&& 



WICHITA AREA ARB REPORTS . . . 
4 out of 5 KTVH VIEWERS are ADULTS 



it*? 



i^\ 



•i- 



ADULTS WITH BUYING POWER 



* 



In the June, 1957 ARB of the Wichita area, 
KTVH leads the way where it counts — with 
2,872,897 adult viewer impressions in the top 

73 quarter hours. Four out of five viewers 
on KTVH are adults, who pack real 

"grownup" buying power! 



1 TO SELL KANSAS . . . BUY KTVH. Exclusive CBS-TV for Central Kansas. 



kTVh 



ward 0. Peterson, General Manager • Represented Nationally by H-R Television, Inc. 



tailcrs were actively solicited as a mat- 
ter of policy, regardless of size, and 
the price per promotion is realistic. 
(85$ less than the original contract 
negotiated some years ago by the then 
Promotion Manager I . We can be for- 
given if we're a bit proud of our work- 
ing arrangements with smaller inde- 
pendents as well as with the largest 
chains. 

Kxperience pays off when merchan- 
dising is needed. The Colgate district 
sales manager was literally speechless 
the day the author arranged feature 
displays in some 140 stores with a 
couple of phone calls: he'd been trying 
to accomplish the same thing for a 
month and only wearing out shoe 
leather and pant's seats in the process. 

Merchandising can be indirect, as 
long as its purpose is maintained. 
Some time ago we received a request 
from the then Snowcrop representa- 
tive. He was interested in finding a 
way to substantiallv affect the sales of 
frozen food products through display 
arrangements. 

Merely increasing the number of 
rows of an item in the refrigerator 
case as is normally done proved to be 
of questionable value, at best. Shelf 
talkers helped to a certain extent, but 
didn't always pay for their production. 
A controlled test, for which we were 
able to help in the twin problems of 
locations and control proved that there 
is one method which will materially 
affect the sales results on this type of 
item. We're sure Snowcrop benefited 
from the information obtained. 

Merchandising is not confined to the 
food industrv. even though it does bulk 
large because of that industry's rela- 
tive advertising expenditures. In other 
lines, the assistance rendered often will 
take different forms, but the means are 
at hand and the principles of merchan- 
dising equally applicable. 

Take the drug industry for example. 
In Milwaukee only around 8% of all 
retail drug stores are organized to do 
an effective merchandising job. In 
this situation we take our problem to 
the drug distributor. 

For advertisers such as Anahist we 
have been able to add to the sales 
force of the client the effective assist- 
ance of some 20 extra salesmen during 
their heavv selling season. This is 
done bv prevailing upon the drug 
uholesaler to require a quota from 
each salesman, and increase his com- 
pensation for good performance. This 
i* done bv a variation of the exchange 



44 



SPONSOR 



21 SEPTEMBER 1957 



facilit) deal as is i lallj operated in 

conj unction h itli retail outlets. 

Assistance "I this type insures maxi- 
mum distribution to the large inde- 
pendent majorit) which exists in the 
drug field; makes certain thai "out <»l 
stock" conditions are held to a mini- 
mum; exposes the independent retailer 
to the manufacturer's sales story; and 
aids in the distribution and use of 
point ol purchase matei ial. 

For Deering Milliken, Inc., during 
their hack-to-school promotion on Lor- 
ette fabric and Maset yarn, we proved 
ihai a station ran intervene success- 
full) in the Bofl goods held, ["he mer- 
chandising accomplished for this client 
was unspectacular, but Bound. We ob- 
tained newspaper space in department 
store ads; conducted clerk training ses- 
sions in the stores; even carried port- 
able tele\ i-ion sets onto the sales floors 
so the salespeople could become fa- 
niiliar with the advertising claims. Ml 
were small, inexpensive items in them- 
selves, together, the) added up to a 
successful selling promotion. 

Merchandising is not a short cut for 
broadcasting station- to take with 
grand expectations of a rush ol new 
business. Agencies verj properl) 
should refuse to accept merchandising 
as a substitute for performance in a 
station s basic medium. 

On the other hand, agencies should 
not regard merchandising services as 
"free goods." The) are services ren- 
dered to an advertiser in order for him 
to obtain maximum sales results from 
their advertising. It has truh been 
said that advertising can drive a house- 
wife into a store and even up to the 
shell, hut it is merchandising which 
make- her reach for the right package. 

I he logical man to coordinate a sta- 
tion's activities with the advertiser's 
need- and -ales policies is the client's 
local district sales manager. He's the 
man responsible for the territory's 
sales record, and the purpose of all 
advertising and merchandising i- to 
improve that record. 

let the man on the ground judge 
the value of a station's merchandising 
assistance and forward the merchan- 
dising reports. Strip the tinsel off the 
prett) pictures and judge a station's 
advertising and merchandising effec- 
tiveness 1>\ the sale- record. The 
money in the cash register is all that 
really counts. 

The biggest value of merchandising 
programs from a stations point of 



vantage lies in renewals oi satisfied 
ad\ ei i isei - and the relations m hii h this 
assistance helps t" fostei between ad- 
\ ei i isers and then media. 

Here al W ISN \M l\ we have a 
nhole h'>-i "i -i -.(-"nal advertisers who 
repeatedl) i ome bai k to us \ eai aftei 
year, led b) the effectiveness of oui 
combination ol pel i"i main e in oui 
basic media plus the men handi 
sei \ ices w ith w hich we bai k h up. \ 
fi h nt these clients I . S. Rubbei I 
Roberts, Johnson, Rand; Fels-Naptha; 
Lan-o-sheen; Mishawaka Rubber & 
\\ oolen Mfg. I o.; Deering, Milliken: 



D. L. Clark Co ' 

Oui men handi 
-i-i.d in entl) in ihi i ' t.. 

\\ ISN I \ ..l II I II. .-,/ ' 
produi i-. ami Northei n Papei Mills 

\inl there - the ii ue m< the 

handising -im ) . < I men ban- 

ili-iii-' i- ii"i no essai il) I promo- 
tion, |u-i at ""d promotion i- nol 
mi . --.ii il) good men handising. I In- 
n|.|i-i lives are different. 

lake art, men handising is limited 
onl) lis the limitations of those who 
seek in emplo) it Learn it- pr< 
applications and enjo) the results, ^ 




Bigger than you think! The 



umoi 



Port Arth 



ge 



area is the fourth largest market 
in Texas and it's all yours with 
KFDM Beaumont Radio and TV 



CBS 
ABC 






See PETERS-GRIFFIN-WOODWARD, inc. 



SPONSOR 



2] SEPTEMBER !').■>, 



45 



NIELSEN AND TRENDEX 

(Continued from page K)) 

comedies was almost identical in both 
studies. 

It i> also interesting to note that the 
Bryan Houston study, done on the 
basis of V | * i- 1 1 1956 Trendex and \iel- 
•rii ratings, came up with almost the 
same average rating spread. The 
ii fury spread came to 5.5 points while 
sponsor's figure is 5.7, a remarkable 
similarity even taking only statistical 
variations into account. 

Paul Keller, associate research di- 
rector of Reach. McClinton. who ran 
the study at Bryan Houston when he 
was associate research director there, 
said the rating spread could he at- 
tributed to three factors. They are 
I 1 I difference in method between 
Nielsen and Trendex. 121 different 
areas surveyed and (3) statistical 
error. 

He calculated the first factor by 
comparing the 15-city Trendex and 
Nielsens 14-city multi-network rat- 
ing. Since the coverage of these two 
measurements are almost identical. 
Keller assumed that the difference in 
the average ratings of the two services 
would be due to differences in tech- 
nique. This figure came to 2.4 rating 
points. 

Keller then compared the national 
Nielsen with the 14-city Nielsen and 
found the average rating differed b) 
2.1 points. This figure is a measure 
of program preferences of the U. S. 
as a whole vs. the 14 cities, since the 
method of measuring was identical. 

The remaining 1.0 rating points in 
the total average spread of 5.5 points 
Keller ascribed to expected statistical 
error. 

The fact that several sources con- 
sider five rating points a good average 
spread between Trendex and Nielsen 
indicates that it is more than a coin- 
cidence. While this figure is not re- 
liable in predicting a Nielsen ratin» 
lor a specific show, it appears reliable 
for predicting a general sets-in-use 
level. 

This doesn't mean that it is possible 
to come up with any kind of mathe- 
matical formula. Research must be 
tempered with judgment and a broad 
knowledge of other factors that influ- 
ence ratings. This is especially true 
with trying to figure out the first rat- 
ing of the season. An educated guess 
can be made but it must be made with 
care. ^ 







?L 1-6353 




Network Affiliations: NBC; ABC; MBS Sales Offices: New York, Cincinnati, Ch 
Sales Representatives: NBC Spot Sales: Detroit. Los Angeles, San Frarf 

SPONSOR • 21 SEPTEMBER 1957 



Li y 



\ n n 



S^SS,^ £lo* " «* *"*<> con- 
of the more than 2870 Radi^t f? SSt aud i«nces 
W* Radio will givers tuf S * atlons " America 
^duplicated rad S io audience' 1 L "^^ ***£ 
radio, check with the wfw LV ° before J™ buy 
You 'H be gl ad you"",™ Radl ° representative^ 



3uarLowrance& Associates. Inc.. Charlotte. Atlanta. Dallas Crosley Broadcasting Corporation, a division of 



Avco 



SPONSOR ASKS 




Should a station representative approach the client directly «* 




E. E. (Jim) Eshleman, Jr., sales man- 
ager, radio ditision, Edward Petry & Co., 

New York 
We, in radio, feel that it is not only 
appropriate but often mandatory to 
sell the client directly in certain types 
of sales efforts involving, for example: 

1. An attempt to convert a non-radio 
account. 

2. Presenting a different general 
Inning pattern, such as afternoon vs. 



"creation of 
a better 
understanding? 



morning or nighttime vs. daytime. 

3. Securing an addition to a market 
list. 

4. Creation of a better understand- 
ing of a particular station's qualitative 
values when we feel that an agency is 
using sliderule buying methods. 

5. An effort to help the buyer com- 
municate a vital change in the over-all 
competitive radio picture in a market 
in which the advertiser is vitally in- 
terested, such as a totally new pro- 
graming concept, new facilities, or 
other factors not yet reflected in a rat- 
ing trend. 

6. Direct demonstration of a par- 
ticular station's extra special service 
capabilities, such as merchandising, 
point-of-sale displays, end or dump 
displays, competitive store checks, etc. 
These activities are often of more in- 
terest to the client himself than the 
timebuyer. 

We make every effort to maintain 
excellent relationships with buyers, 



media directors, account executives, as 
well as the client. When such a re- 
lationship has been properly estab- 
lished, there is no feeling of "going 
over the timebuyer's head.'" 

The problem and circumstances 
must dictate the approach to be taken. 
Certainly there can be no fixed plan 
since agency organization and pro- 
cedures vary, as well as agency-client 
relationships. 

There are many ways we go about 
these direct client contacts. The actual 
contact may take the form of a direct 
call on the advertising manager or 
sales manager I sometimes both) by 
the representative salesman assigned to 
the account, but more often it will be a 
joint sales call by r the representative 
salesman and his sales manager. When- 
ever it is possible, we include an ex- 
ecutive of the station involved. 



Adam Young, Adam Young, Inc., New 

York 
Client contact is not bypassing the 
agency. Rather, it is the media repre- 
sentative's insurance that he is provid- 
ing maximum service to the advertiser. 




we are spe- 
cialists in how 
best to sell'' 



the agency, and to his own clients — 
in our case, broadcasters. 

We believe that active, continuing 
contact with the advertiser is a basic 
responsibility in station representation. 
Broadcasting is such a fast moving, 



rapidly changing field that no agen< \ 
or advertiser can keep currently in- 
formed except through the efforts of 
station representatives. 

With so many media decisions made 
at the client level, this contact is essen- 
tial if we are to get for our stations the 
business they deserve. Effective rep- 
resentation requires that a selling job 
be done with every individual who 
has any voice in the selection of media 
and markets. 

Competing media have followed this 
policy for years, and the broadcast 
media are short-changing themselves 
if they neglect to sell both agency and 
client on the use of radio and tele- 
vision. 

In addition to its sales aspect, direct 
contact with the client enables the rep- 
resentative to service the advertiser 
more thoroughly. We are specialists 
in how best to sell those markets where 
we represent broadcast facilities. Be- 
cause we concentrate on a limited num- 
ber of stations, our knowledge of each 
market's characteristics is wider and 
deeper than any agencv can be ex- 
pected to acquire. Our i esearch and 
sales service staff is ready to provide 
the client with extensive analysis on 
any phase of his sales problems in our 
areas. 



Frank E. Pellegrin, vice president and 
partner, H-R Television, Inc.; New York 
I believe it is appropriate to sell the 
client direct 

1. When the problem goes beyond 
ordinary media considerations. 

2. When extra strong competition 
from other (and unfriendb I media re- 
quires. 

3. When an agency research or 
media department does not give a par- 



48 



SPONSOR • 21 SEPTEMBER 1957 



ticulai market its propel recognition 
in ici iii^ ni Bales potent i.il. due to spe 
rial circumstances which we feel would 
be better understood and appreciated 
l>\ the client 

I. When more than advertising con- 
siderations are involved, Buch as per- 
sonal or political angles. 

.">. \\ lien you think \ « » 1 1 an- not get- 
ting a full and fail hearing, ami every- 
thing t'lsc fails. 

(>. When, for an\ of several good 
reasons, an agency asks "i suggests 

that \ nil do it. 

Remember that in tin' intricate ad- 
vertising field there are all kinds "I 
agencies; Borne do a superbl) complete 

job with their client- and it i- never 

necessar) to -ell them direct. Others 

are just (he < >p| >< >- it«- and there are all 

shades in between. You have to be 
guided therefore b] your best judg- 
ment, experience and knowledge of the 
particular sel of facts in each case, so 
it is impossible l" sel up one fixed rule. 



"It's best to 
he completely 

Iran/:" 



W hen making the direct client ap- 
proach, I think it's best to he com- 
pletely frank about it with l><>th agenc) 
and client. It's best to clear the call 
with the agenc) beforehand if this is 
possible, and if not. to notifj them 
of your intentions and then to brief 
the agency people involved on w hat 
transpired soon afterwards. 

Client meetings should be earefulK 
planned and prepared and pitched on 
a high constructive level, with the idea 
of adding to the client's knowledge 
rather than nierelv complaining of 
real or fancied ill treatment. 

Even if you are making the call be- 
cause you think you got a had deal 
from the agency, it's better to make 
a solid constructive presentation to the 
client, without casting aspersions, be- 
cause this will accomplish both pur- 
poses; it will get you the order if you 
deserve it and will not destrov your 
relations with an agency that might 
he otherwise treating you quite fairly. 
Be sure, however, to supply the agencv 
with the same information vou give 
the client. 

In fact, there are main clients that 
[Please turn page) 




fine fabulous 





TV-TULSA covers 45 counties where . . . 

AUTOMOTIVE SALES TOTAL 
$314,275,000.00* 

Within the "fabulous 45" is Tulsa, 12th in auto 
sales in the U. S. and second in cars per capita. 
Auto sales in the 31 Oklahoma counties equal well 
over half of Oklahoma's total . . . The half you 
can't reach without TV-Tulsa. 

you get the fabulous 45.** ' * •. 

on LY , wi th ; TULSA : 



■Sales Management's Survey 
of Buying Power, 1957 




SPONSOR 



21 SEPTEMBER 1957 



49 



SPONSOR ASKS continued . . . 

we call on regularl) in our normal 
operations and have been doing so for 
man} years. This is common practice, 
and I believe it is thoroughl) under- 
stood l>\ the agencies concerned. 
Surel) the) would agree that no one 
should attempl to render clients or 
salesmen incommunicado, or to build 
impregnable walls between them. We 
are all interested in the same end: 
better service to the client and better 
results from his advertising, and if 
each part) will treat the others with 
fairness and frankness, everybod) con- 
cerned will do a better job. 

M. F. Beck, radio sales. The Katz igenc) 
The client is an integral part of the 
sales formula and is always included 
by The Katz Agenc) in its sales ap- 
proach. A representative's obligation 
to a client station, as we see it. is to 
do a well-rounded selling job. This in- 
cludes a coordinated sales effort aimed 
at both client and agency, in addition 
to continuing contact by the station 
with local wholesalers and distributors. 
The most effective selling of spot radio 
cannot be accomplished in New York 
alone, but onl) when the local buying 
inlluences are approached as well. 

While this pattern is always applic- 
able, there are cases in which it max 
be altered and more than usual em- 
phasis placed on selling the client di- 
r ' 



coordination 

on all levels" 



rectly. We can cite three examples: 

1. Concept selling: When we are 
selling spot radio as a medium, espe- 
cially where past advertising has been 
in other media, an intensified client 
approach is necessary. 

2. Very often the client has a unique 
appreciation of the advantages of spot 
radio. We also find many knowledge- 
able clients who can discern best bins 
in markets. In such cases a direct 
client sell is a distinct advantage, with 
the agency advised at all times of de- 
velopments. Bv the same token, many 
clients leave media selection completely 
in the hands of their agency. 

3. When a sales message does not 
get the reception at the agenc) we 
think it deserves, we do a complete 
selling job, comparable to an agenc) 
presentation, direct to the client. Ibis. 



Which 




again, is always done with the agenc) a 
lull knowledge to insure coordination 
on all levels. 

Ed Jameson, directoi o) SBC Television 

Spot Sales. \eii > ml. 

We have approached main prospects 
directl) to show win spot tv merits in- 
clusion in their advertising campaigns. 
Alter consulting the prospect's 
agenes (with which we al\\a\s main- 




"how can 

we lielj> 
create sales 



lain close contact I and learning all we 
can about the client and his product, 
we ask ourselves: How can we help 
this potential client to create new 
sales areas or expand his present ones? | 

An intelligent recommendation can 
be made only when the client's selling, 
merchandising, advertising and even 
personnel problems are understood. 

Sometimes the client has a problem 
that doesn't involve straight selling. 
It may deal with the firm's relations 
with its employees or its stockholders. 
Depending on the facts in a particu- 
lar situation, we point out how spot 
television can help solve the problem, 
either by itself or with other media. 

Basing our recommendation on the 
kind of audience the client wants to 
reach, we may recommmend a news, 
sports or weather show, syndicated or 
feature film. . . . etc. 

After the prospect has become a 
client of NBC Spot Sales, we go to 
him directly to show how our adver- 
tising, promotion, research and mer- 
chandising departments are at work. 
Agencies recognize us as a prime 
mover of products and are therefore 
interested in our continuing efforts in 
this area. The) often suggest that we 
approach the client to demonstrate 
how spot can be used profitably in the 
14 markets which we represent. 

Much missionary work remains to 
be done for the medium of spot tv. to 
educate clients to its tremendous ad- 
vantages. To help accomplish this. 
NBC Spot Sales recent l\ created a 
"New Business" department. This de- 
partment, which is unique in the field 
of station representation, will make 
concentrated efforts to sell the overall 
concept of spot to agencies as well as 
directh t<> the client. t* 



m 



i 




50 



CERTAINLY, you know what you're 
doing I But who are you to say that 
this baby, that gal, will rule the raves 
straight across the country? Why not 
pretest your talent ... put it on film 
. . . show it to audiences— of all types, 
all locales. Then you'll know in 
advance. What's more you enjoy the 
advantage of easier programming, 
deeper coverage . . . when you 
USE EASTMAN FILM. 

For complete information write to: 
Motion Picture Film Department 

EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY 

Rochester 4, N.Y. 



Do if IN COLOR . . . 

You'll be glad you did I 




East Coast Division 

342 Madison Avenue 

New York 17, N.Y. 



West Coast Division 
6706 Santa Monica Blvd. 
Hollywood 38, California 



Midwest Divi 
1 30 East Randolph Drive 
Chicago 1, Illinois 



or W. J. GERMAN, INC. 

Agents for the sale and distribution of Eastman Professional 
Motion Picture Films, Fort Lee, N. J.; Chicago, III.; Hollywood, Calif. 



i. I spot editor 

4 column sponsored by one of the leading film producers in television 

SAKHA 



NEW YORK: 200 EAST 56TH STREET 
CHICAGO: 16 EAST ONTARIO STREET 




How to humanize roller bearings? Sarra makes them act! Via stop motion a 
Timken roller bearing rolls, then zooms into stirring shots of the product in- 
use ... in planes, trains, farm equipment. A switchback to stop motion at the 
end underscores the Timken slogan: "At Timken, we have a word for it — 
betterness." An exciting commercial that opens and closes the Timken show. 
Produced bv SARRA in Eastman color and in black and white for The 
TIMKEN ROLLER BEARING CX). through BATTEN, BAR ION. Dl'R 
STINE & OSBORN, INC. 

SARRA, INC. 

New York: 200 East 56th Street 

Chicago: 16 East Ontario Street 




4-1 




Here's a how a spectacular" 5-minute spectacular for Rheingold does a triple 
job. It introduces the 1958 Miss Rheingold contestants, urges the public to 
vote in the country's second largest election, subtly sells via the ballot boxes — 
and makes a musical comedy of the entire spot. Marge and Gower Champion 
— working with a special musical score — sing, dance, and "emcee" the show. 
The highlight of a park scenic design is a stylized carrousel — a device that 
makes possible three natural and interesting presentations of the 1958 con- 
testants. Produced bv SARRA for LIEBMANN BREWERIES, INC. through 
FOOTE, CONE & BELDING. 

SARRA, INC. 

New York: 200 East 56th Street 

Chicago: 16 East Ontario Street 

This 60-second spot, one of a series for Zenith Radio Corporation, forcefully 
demonstrates how beautiful a Zenith Hi-Fi set looks, and how realistic it 
sounds. Decorator-planned interiors enhance Zenith models. So that anyone 
can see how the component parts of a Zenith Hi-Fi set operate, the various 
elements are popped in — in sync with voice over. Here technical information 
is delivered with seeming simplicity. Produced bv SARRA for ZENITH 
RADIO CORPORATION through EARLE LUDG1N & COMPANY. 

SARRA, INC. 

New York: 200 East 56th Street 

Chicago: 16 East Ontario Street 




This commercial for Knox Gelatine brings statistics to life — with hands! 
Hands moving against a black background demonstrate how 7 out of 10 
women with splitting, breaking fingernails can benefit from Knox Gelatine. 
They also create enough excitement to hold interest high for the convincing 
product demonstration and close-ups of package that follow. The entire story 
of Knox Gelatine-for-fingernails is packed — with apparent ease — into 20 
seconds. Produced by SARRA for CHARLES B. KNOX GELATINE CO., 
INC. through CHARLES W. HOYT COMPANY, INC. 

SARRA, INC. 

New York: 200 East 56th Street 

Chicago: 16 East Ontario Street 



SPONSOR 



21 SEPTEMBER 195' 



Reports and evaltu 

opinit bn buyeri and 



FILM-SCOPE 



21 September NTA, which was the first syndicator to tak< a fliei Into bartei lime, thl w« i k 

owwtiM ■•« became a crusader against this sort of business. 

«npN*nn rllULICATIONS INC 

Oliver \. I nger, \l'\ executive v.p., in a scathii nl di cribed i 

"downgrading values of both films and station lime" and a "detrimental i<> lh< 
entire i> industry." 

\(l(lcd I nger: The healthiest economj [or the film business is through purchases al 
"regular and package station rates" by ad agencies "trained in tin specifics ol 
limebuying." 

A barter deal which NTA had going with Exquisite Form Bra recentlj fizzled. 

fhis week as for man} before rising costs continued lo gel star billing in the 

film business. "Where, saj harassed filmmakers, "will the production mone from?" 

Short range, FILM-SCOPE finds, it will continue to come from three tried and true 
sources : 

I i I'lIE BANKS: ITiis kind "I borrowing costs between .V \ and 695 ''pin- serv- 
ice charge). What usuallj happens is that a producer j:*-!-. a guarantee from a dis- 
tributor that the hank will be repaid. On the basis of this understanding, the bank 
forks over the money. Thr distributor jj«'is a cut (around 2.V ", ) for his share in t li> 
deal, and the bank keeps a claim on the producer's product until he settles up. 

2i THE "FACTOR"*: In the broadest sense, this is .1 fellow who gives you "second 
money." .Because of h is greater risk and because "second money" is t • . ♦ i • i "fT last 
factoring charges run high. \n actual figure i- prettj meanii se the I 

usuall] throws in special charges and gets a -hare in the production besides. 

3) THE DISTRIBUTOR: This tends to be a straight two-waj ownership deal 
in which the producer furnishes the technology and the distributor the cash. The -|ilit in 
ownership and profits is 50-50. 

Note: Foreign financing usually involves ■'till another step — a sort of comple- 
tion and delivery insurance. I he banks just won't loan you mone) <>n a promised pro- 
duction because foreign lav won't honor a chattel n on it. s " you first hi 

contract for a guarante ■ insurance) that monies invested b) a hank 1 will be 

paid <dT. In England, Film Finance- Ltd. deal- exclusivel) in these guaranl 

It goes without saying that this financial rigmarole — in whole or in part— -gets 

calculated into the final cost of a film. 



Transfilm i* inviting New York agencies for a peck al some new experimental 
footage in the hope that the techniques can 1"" used in commercials. 

\ll thai the trade know- about it is that it employs live photograph) plus several 
new devices and that Transfilm has sunk several thousand into devel 

The fate <>f the Lucj reruns on I BS in the Wednesdaj 7:3(W1 tune period 
momentarily look* cheery. \n overnight ["rendex showed thai it was a close m 
with the nv\s Disneyland Beries "ii \BC T\ . 

Next question: What happens when NBC*;- Wagon Train starts t" roll? 
SPONSOR • 21 SEPTEMBER 1957 



FILM-SCOPE continued . 



When FILM-SCOPE asked a group of its Station Spotters recently how their relation- 
ships with s\ndicators were shaping up, the broadcasters in the main said that they 
would like less of the fast-buck technique (31 August, page 77 l. 

This week FILM-SCOPE asked syndicators for their version. The Spotters: 
Bernie Crost, sales v. p., Walter Schwimmer; Don L. Kearney, sales v. p., ABC Film Syn- 
dication; Jake Keever, NBC TV Films, v.p.; Tom Moore, general salesmanager, CBS 
rV Film Sales; Boh Rich, general sales manager, AAP; and Bob Seidelman, manager 
syndicated sales, Screen Gems. 

In general, the film people think they are getting along pretty well with their 
customers considering this major handicap: The use of film has spread so rapidly 
that many stations can't seem to keep up with the latest concepts. Specifically: 

1 ) Rigid programing notions still prevail, sometimes blinding stations to a more 
flexible use of film. 

2) Similarly, the "fixed-top" price idea keeps cropping up. With better quality 
film, say the syndicators, stations often could boost local rates. In fact, too many sta- 
tions buy film "by the pound." 

3) "Red tape" screening leads to hard feelings. Thus Station A will ask for a 
preliminary showing for its film buyer and program director, followed by a subsequent 
screening for its top brass. Meantime competing Station B quickly makes up its mind and 
takes the deal. Station A now burns. 

4) Although stations are prone to complain about lack of merchandising aids, the 
shoe is apt to fit the other foot. Film has a point-of-sale value for sponsors — an im- 
portant angle that stations tend to overlook. 

5) In the same vein, stations usually could get higher ratings (especially on 
feature film) if they were as energetic in their hoopla as theatre exhibitors. 

6) Looking down his nose at a film salesman may help a broadcasters ego, but it also 
shuts off some of the know-how the salesman could give him. "I wish they would 
stop calling us peddlers," says one film man. "Where else do they think they could 
get film — from Sears, Roebuck?" 

Every business has a certain amount of convenient statistical rubber. This week the 
s\ ndication business is discussing how you gauge sales. 

• Do you count by markets, or 

• Do you count by stations? 

To get a real idea, the trade feels, you should have a station list. That will 
show up any duplications within markets. 



Horror films again were in the news this week. 

Madame Tussaud's Wax Museum — which exhibits characters whose contributions to 
infamy earned them a place in its Chamber of Horrors — will be filmed for tv. 

Robert Siodmak and Jules Buck, together with British film producer Charles Reyn- 
olds, have tv rights to the files and name of the fantastic museum, and will produce the 
series of 39 on the continent for distribution in 1958. 



FLASHES FROM THE FILM FIELD: Caribe Films, Inc., a Puerto Rican Co.. 
has been set up to service U.S. accounts and shoot for financial savings through tax exemp- 
tions and government cooperation in that country . . . Buster Crabbe stars in the new 
half-hour tv series, Davy Jones, which is deep in under-water sequences — a new fad with 
the kids . . . TPA says its initial 1957-58 budget is set at $6 million with five new shows 
upcoming . . . The object of ZIV's latest expansion move is to provide more complete 
-ales coverage because of the ever-increasing rise in syndicated sales. 



54 



SPONSOR 



21 SEPTEMBER 1957 







aunches another! 



WAVY-TV in Norfolk sets sail as ABC-TV's 



74th jive station, raising 
ABC-TV coverage to 93.1 % 




* 



Add another to the growing list of ABC-TV live markets. This one 

s Norfolk-Portsmouth, Virginia - where WAVY-TV (Channel 10) went 

on the air in September as a full-time ABC-TV affiliate. Now 

all of this great market (the nation's 37th television market) can see 

all ABC-TV shows — as scheduled and programmed. 

ABC's affiliation with WAVY-TV raises our live coverage to 78 

of all U. S. TV homes. Already this year, we've added stations 

in San Antonio, Tucson, St. Louis and Miami. In the offing, 

this season, are live, competitive ABC-TV affiliates 

in Peoria, Indianapolis, New Orleans, Omaha, 

Youngstown, Boston. Amarillo and Pittsburgh. 

These will push our live coverage up to 85° . 

To advertisers. ABC-TV extends a cordial invitation to 

take a closer look at the new ABC coverage story. 

And to Norfolk, it's a hearty "Welcome aboard!" 












•Total coverage for average half-hour evening program. More Bw :; 



No doubt about it, there's many a truth spoken in gist CNP'fl philosophy 
can be spelled out very briefly: 

We believe in Planned Production. With our "Hoots and Saddles— the Story 
of the Fifth Cavalry" just released for syndication, we're well on the way to completion of our 
next series, "Union Pacific." And the cameras are set to roll on yet another serie.-. Continuity 
of effort like this is why we have and hold some of the best creative people in the business. 

Our production plans are our own. We have full confidence in the continued 
growth of non-network television, and we have undertaken to supply its program needs on a 
regular basis. The result: film of far greater quality per dollar invested than is possible in an 
intermittent, piecework, patchwork operation. The beneficiaries: non-network advertisers, broad- 
casters, the public, and us. 

Our creative decisions are our own. We believe that tailoring a series to 
the assorted demands of all potential customers only leads to the kind of programming that's 
best described as corned beef hash. 

Our timing is our own. When we produce a new series, it's because our own 
best creative judgment tells us that a series is ripe for the making — not because a "pilot film" 
has lured enough advance sales to underwrite any part of our negative costs. 

We don't create consumers and we don't create advertising. We do create 
entertainment that energizes consumers for advertising. And because CNP production doesn't 
wait on sales, temporary fluctuations, or other people's opinions, we'll always be ready, a.< we 
are right now, with prime syndicated TV film product to meet the growing needs of an expanding 
Non-Network Market. That's the CNP storv in a nutshell. nbc television mlms a division oi 



CNP 

CALIFORNIA NATIONAL PRODUCTIONS. 1ST 



II50 KC 



<3u ^ 




Why 

should 

I buy- 




SOUTHERN NORTHERN 

OREGON* CALIFORNIA 

* money "markets" 

Best Buu 

KF<3I 

KLAMATH FM.LS, OREGON 

AsW. -the Meeker Co. 



5000 W 



58 



National and regional spot buys 
in work now or recently completed 



SPOT BUYS 



TV BUYS 

Procter & Camble Co., Cincinnati, is preparing a campaign for its 
Crisco in various markets. Schedule kicks-off in September for an 
indefinite period. Announcements of varied lengths will be placed 
during daytime segments: frequency will depend upon the market. 
Buyer: Graham Hay and Bob Pape. Agency: Compton Advertising, 
New York. (Agency declined to comment.) 

General Foods Corp., Maxwell House Div.. is going into scattered 
markets for its Regular Maxwell House coffee. Campaign begins 1 
October for 26 weeks. Nighttime minutes are sought, with fre- 
quency varying. Buying is not completed. Buyer: Roger Clapp. 
Agency: Benton & Bowles, Inc., New York. (Agency declined to 
comment.) 

Exquisite Form Brassiere Co., New York, is entering various mar- 
kets to promote its undergarments. Late September schedule will 
run for 52 weeks. Minutes and chainbreaks will be slotted both day- 
time and nighttime: frequencv varies from market to market. Buyer: 
Jo Napoli. Agency: Grey Advertising Agency, New ^ ork. This is 
the cash portion of the schedule, part of which is barter. (Agency 
declined to comment.) 

Procter & Camble Co., Cincinnati, is initiating a campaign in 
Southern markets for its Tide detergent. The September schedule 
will run for 52 weeks. Minutes and chainbreaks will be placed 
during nighttime hours; average frequency: five per week per mar- 
ket. Buyer: Dave Place. Agency: Benton & Bowles, New York. 
(Agency declined to comment.) 

Bissell Carpet Sweeper Co., Grand Rapids, is going into the top 
56 markets for its Breeze sweeper. September schedule will run for 
seven weeks. Minute film announcements will be used during day- 
time segments: frequencv will depend upon the market. Buyer: 
Frank Carvell. Agency: N. W. A\er. New York. 



RADIO AND TV BUYS 

The Wheatena Corp.. Rahway. N. J., is planning on using radio 
and television spot to reach the housewife, after many years of 
strictlv print advertising. Radio-tv schedule initiates 30 September 
for 18 weeks: a 10-week run. four weeks off. then an eight-week run. 
Announcements will be slotted primarily during daytime segments, 
Mondav through Frida\ : frequenc) will vary from market to market. 
Buying is not completed. Buyer: Jim Ducey. Agency: Cunningham 
& \\ alsh. New York. 



SPONSOR 



21 SEPTEMBER 1957 



things ^ 



/^.VKfr 



- 



■ 



\ 

1 






are 




re ally 



B-U-Z-Z-Z-I-N-G! 

While some have been sleepy as gophers over the summer, 
the Young group have been "busy as bees." The result is 
more honey for the stations — and more stations to represent. 
The new hives of activity are: 

W S A I Cincinnati 

WYDE Birmingham 

yN I L D Boston 

ADAM YOUNG INC. 

NEW YORK • CHICAGO • ST. LOUIS • LOS ANGELES • SAN FRANCISCO • BOSTON 

•represented by Young Representatives Inc. 



Worcester WORC 

Topeka K %3 A V 

Why not taste some honey yourself? 



SPONSOR • 21 SEPTEMBER 1957 






Capsule case histories of successful 
local and regional radio campaigns 






RADIO RESULTS 



DRUG STORE 

SPONSOR: Jackson's Drug Store VGENCi : Direct 

Capsule case history: Results-getting radio advertising 
and alert merchandising can mean success for any business. 
This adage has been proven true for Jackson's Drug Store. 
In December of 1948, Wallace Jackson was introduced to 
radio advertising by the area's new station, KGYN. Eight 
years and 3,000 broadcasts later, he's still advertising on 
KGYN. The store's old 25-ft. front has been replaced with 
a beautiful new 100-ft. building and a branch prescription 
department has been added at one of the local clinics. For 
the 3,000th consecutive broadcast, Jackson's 40-minute live 
morning organ show Among my Souvenirs, was performed 
from the store. The crowds and the phone requests were so 
overwhelming in the town of Guymon and the entire sur- 
rounding area that another program was broadcast later 
that day, with equal audience response. Both Jackson and 
KGYN realize that the first 3,000 are only the beginning. 

KGYN, Oklahoma Citj PURCHASE: Program 



SOFT DRINK 

SPONSOR: Washington Coca-Cola AGENCY: Direct 

Capsule case history: After some months of disappoint- 
ing advertising results, Washington Cola Cola decided to 
try radio advertising on independent specialty stations be- 
cause (1) their music appealed to a large audience in the 
area and (2) they had a low cost-per-1,000. Coca Cola was 
able to purchase five specialty stations for the price of one 
network outlet. Count ry-and- western music station WARL 
was given a substantial part I $2,244 i of the budget for a 
period of three months, to help increase sales in the metro- 
politan area. The first month hypoed 'Coke' sales 20' '< in 
the Silver Spring. Md.. area. 15' '< in the Alexandria, Va.. 
area, and 14% in the D. C. area. Consequently, the firm 
renewed for 52 weeks and have since realized a profit in- 
crease of up to 30' i over last year. \\ ith the inauguration 
of the second campaign. 'Coke' increased the number of 
stations used in the area, from the original four to 10. 



WARL, Arlington 



Y\ RCH\SF. : Announcements 



AUTOMOBILES 

SPONSOR: Coyer Motor Co. AGENCY: Direct 

Capsule case history: For 21 years, this Scranton Chrys- 
ler dealer has sponsored The Coyer Show, a musical pres- 
entation on WGBI, Sundays from 5:30 to 6:00 p.m. Nick 
Coyer reports WGBI has expanded his sales area to surli 
distant towns as Mount Pocono, Luzerne and Carbondale, 
which have their own Chrysler dealers. From a small be- 
ginning, Coyer has become one of the area's largest Chrj s- 
ler dealers. With 5(V ', of his ad budget in radio (the re- 
mainder is divided in print). Coyer and WGBI lia\e cre- 
ated many new slogans and promotion ideas. One of tlicm. 
"Coyarized Used Cars," has won strong public recognition. 
Indication of radio's good will: people constantly visit show- 
room to request numbers to be played. The auto agencj 
reports that radio advertising has been primariK responsible 
for their success in the area. Coyer says: "00' < 
of the cars sold have radios — and radio sells cars!" 



WGBI. Set inton 



I'l RCH VSE: 30 minutes 



SHOPPING CENTER 

SPONSOR: Lochwood Shopping AGENCY: Clarke, Dunagan & 

Capsule case history: What happens when a new, giant 
shopping center backs its opening day with 24-hours of on- 
the-spot radio coverage? The result is the biggest crowd 
ever gathered in Dallas except for the opening of the State 
Fair. Police estimated 103.000 shoppers turned out to see 
the center dedicated, to be entertained by an all-star line-u|>. 
and to visit Lochwood's 36 retail stores. KLIF placed a 
specially designed glass 'fishbowT broadcast booth at the 
shopping center for the 24-hour schedule. Beginning at 
12:01 a.m.. its d.j."s did their regularly scheduled shows 
from the 'fishbowl." All commercial time during the <la\ 
was allocated to Lochwood's merchants. Bill Dunagan, of 
Clarke. Dunagan X Humnes. the agency, said: "Advertis- 
ing the shopping center on KLIF made it one of the cit) - 
greatest promotions in years. The full impact of 24 hours 
of radio put the Lochwood opening "over the top! 

KLIF, Dallas PI RCHASE: 24-hour schedull 



60 



SPONSOR 



21 SEPTEMBER 195 1 




Two exciting 

personality programs 

daily from Detroit's 

EASTLAND SHOPPING 

CENTER 



The huge, new $25 million Eastland Shopping Center 
is the talk of Detroit. It features 73 stores, has 
parking space for 8300 cars, serves a neighborhood 
of almost a half million people— more people than 
live in Omaha, Toledo, Nashville, Miami or 
Ft. Worth. 



Naturally, WWJ is right in the center of things with 
its exclusive glassed-in studio, two top notch music 
-and-interview programs every weekday, merchan- 
dise displays, and other salesmaking features. 



Step up your Detroit business by using this power- 
ful one-two punch on WWJ. 



WWJ 



AM AND FM 

RADIO 



WORLD'S FIRST RADIO STATION 

Owned and operated by The Detroit News 

NBC Aff.l.o'e 

National Representatives Peters, Griffin, Woodward, Inc. 



I 




/ 



I 



JIM WOOD 
1 1:05 A.M.- 12 Noon— Weekdays 





m^- 




» , 



JIM DE LAND 
4:30-6:00 P.M._Weekdays 



SPONSOR • :?| SEPTEMBER 1957 



61 



Reeves errives 




Here's the 

showmanship- 
salesmanship 

mood that makes the new, 
Live Jim Reeves Show click 




The Jim Reeves Show joins American Radio's live, weekda 

Jim Reeves, whose song hit Four Walls is pushing the million sales mark, brings to American 
a 10-year record of radio success as a local musical personality, network guest star and 
persuasive air salesman. 

His new musical hour, The Jim Reeves Show, originates live from WSM Nashville, home 
of today's hottest musical talent. Featuring the Anita Kerr Singers (live) and Owen Bradley's 
orchestra (live), it will boast regular guest appearances of such top-tune artists as Marty 
Robbins, Ferlin Husky and the Everly Brothers. 

The live Jim Reeves Show is backed up by the showmanship-salesmanship skill of WSM 
and the new American Broadcasting Network. 



ctober 7 ! 




"isical line-up Monday, October 7 1-2 pm 



th 



o 




one is 




AMERICAN 

BROADCASTING 

NETWORK 



NOW IN 

ROANOKE 

and Western Virginia 

WDBJfr 



followed by 



the 



EARLY SHOW 



Famous Feature Movies 




Monday through Friday 
4:00 to 6.05 P. M. 

Your Peters, Griffin, Woodward 
"Colonel" tan give you the full sfory con- 
cerning porficipafions. Call him now.' 




ROANOKE, VA. 

Owned and operated by 
the Times -World Corp. 



News and Idea 
WRAP-UP 




ADVERTISERS 

Sunshine Biscuits which has been 
using spot tv in 70 markets, is 
moving into network tv for the 
first time, beginning this week. 

CBS TV's Beat the Clock and Garry 
Moore Show are the two vehicles. 

Supplementing these network buys, 
Sunshine plans to use some film syn- 
dicated shows I Highway Patrol. Code 
3 and others I in selected markets. 

Cunningham & Walsh is the agencv . 

This fall its going to be an all- 
television advertising program for 
Drackett Co. with a combination 
of nighttime and daytime network 
tv being used consistently for the 
first time. 

Windex and Drano will he featured 
on NBC TV's Wagon Train I Wednes- 
da\ 7:30-8:30 p.m.) and also on the 
network's da\ timers: Bride & Groom, 
The Price is Right, Tic Tac Dough. 1 1 
Could be You and Today. 

Decision to direct all ad efforts in 
tv was made following a short test last 
spring of the dav plus night tv plan. 

Agency is \ &R. 

Keebler Biscuit Co., in behalf of 
Saltines, this week has begun a 
saturation radio-tv campaign due 
to run the entire month. 

Around 50 radio stations in 46 
Keebler market areas are being used 
and a similar plan for tv is in the 
works. 

Lewis & Oilman. Philadelphia, is 
the agency. 

Lysol (Lehn & Fink), which has 
just signed as one of the co-spon- 
sors of NBC TVs Truth or Con- 
sequences (M-F. ll:30-12n), is 
looking for additional television 
coverage as part of plans for the 
most extensive ad budget in its 71- 
year history . 

^gencv for the disinfectant is M< - 
Cann-Erickson. 

Pharma-Craft has added seven 



daytime network radio shows to 
its fall advertising plans. 

These radio bu\s are in addition to 
sponsorship of an alternate week half- 
hour of NBC TV's Steve Allen Shou 
i Sunday 8-9 p.m. i . 

The radio broadcast schedule in- 
cludes; Art Linkletter, Helen Trent. 
Young Doctor Malone. Ma Perkin 
and Nora Drake on CBS. \ ens oj the 
World on \BC and news program 
preceding and following the Notn 
Dame football games on Mutual. S< 
eral other shows are also being 
sidered. 

Ml radio time will be used to ad 
vertise Coldene cold medicines and 
Pharma-Craft feels that when radi< 
purchases are complete. the\ will adi 
up to the biggest broadcast scheduk 
ever developed for a cold medicine. 

In addition to the network radi< 
schedule. Coldene will be featured oi 
.93 local radio programs in 40 citie- 

JWT is the agency . 

Job notes: Edward Kletter ha- 

been elected vice president and dire< 
tor of advertising for Pharmaceuticals 
He will also serve as a member of tin 
executive committee. Kletter was p 
ident of Parkson Agencv which ban 
dies the Pharmaceuticals account. 

AGENCIES 

With Edward Kletter's move ovei 
to Pharmaceuticals as vice presi 
dent in charge of advertising 
here's the new set up at Parksoi 
Advertising: 

Ted Bergmann replaces Kleltei 
president and chief executive office 
on 1 October. Bergmann comes n 
McCann-Krickson where lie was 
radio-tv vice president. Before M> 
Cann-Erickson. Bergmann was man 
aging director of DuMont and dire 
tor of broadcasting division <>f tin 
Mien B. DuMont Labs. 

Franklin Brink moves from i 
tive vice president of Parkson t' 
chairman of the hoard. 

Parkson bills around 820 million 



64 



SPONSOR 



21 SEPTEMBER 195' 



with 80 ( - going i" .iii media and 
jn' , t,, space. Accounts include 
Pharmaceuticals and I. B. W illiama 
i ,.. products. 

\cm agencj appointment! and refr 
ignationsi J<>?*«'|»li Kat/. Co. baa 

mil the entire Charles Vntell ac- 
ounl effective 30 September . . . 
CHian «K Bronner, Chicago, has 
been appointed i<< handle the adver- 
tising f'H \ nt t »[ »< > i nl ( !o. i >\ ball |pniiit 
\n expanded consumei cam- 

n i» cm rcnlK undei «.i\ . . . Leo 
Burnett has resigned the Eastside di- 
v iaion i Los Vngeles i of Pabst a> of 
;i December. This wa9 the last Pabsl 

. of business in the Burnett 9hop 

Ruthrauff X Ryan lias received 

newal of it- contract for the re- 
i ruitmenl advertising of the \ii Force. 
\e« contract expires 30 June 1958 

Gordon Best for Helene ( lurtis' 
dandruff treatmenl hair tunic for men. 
i nc\n product . . . Kenyon «JC Eck- 
bardl for \.S.K. Products Corp. (for- 

v American Safet) Razor) . . . 
George II. Hartman Co., Chicago, 
for the Kretschmer Wheat Germ ac- 
count. Network radio will I>e used in 
future ad planning . . . Kmil Mogul 
for Barricini Candies, which operates 
iO stores in major eastern cities. New 
advertising program will include 
broadcast media . . . \\ . B. Doner & 
I o. foi I loastal Foods Co. i a dh ision 
■ if Consolidated Foods » . 

1-ocus on personalities: Kieliard 
Wi 1'ully. vice president and account 
supervisor at FCB has been appointed 
general manager of the agency's C *li i - 
office . . . Lawrence J. Jaffe, 
formerl) vice president and director 
of research at Erwin, Wasey, has 
joined Kastor, Farrell, Cheslej \ Clif- 
ford as senior vice president and di- 
rector of marketing and research . . . 
Robert Kelly, formerl) product 
nager at I. ever Brothers, has joined 
I" v ^ as an account executive ... II. 
Maurice Jones has been named as a 
supervisor and Frank R. Ladick as 
an associate in the research depart- 
ment of NLB. Jones formerl) was re- 
search director with Karle Ludgin and 
Ladik comes from Swift & Co. where 
he was a market analyst . . . Sherman 
J. McQueen, formerly with CBS Ra- 
dio, has joined D'Arcy's Los Vngeles 
office as marketing and research rep- 
resentative . . . Dr. Arthur H. Wil- 
kens, formerl) with DFS, has joined 
H&R as a project director in the re- 



SPONSOB • 21 SEPTEMBER L957 



foi* your hmltjfi . . . 

WCUE is no 1 

IN AKRON 



Between 8 A.M. and 5 P.M 



daily, WCUE delivers 
more listeners for your 
ad dollar than any 



other Akron station. 

( In all other periods, just 

a gnat's whisker away from first.' 

See your JEPCO Man for 

details or call WCUE Sales 

Veep, Jack Maurer, FRanklin 6-7114 



'Cost per- thousand study based on Pulse, April 1957 



The ELLIOT STATIONS 

great independents • good neighbors 



ii 



TIM ELLIOT. President 



Akron. Ohio- WCUE WICE-P'ovidtncc R ' 

The John E. Pearson Co. National Representatives 



65 



A pictorial review of local 
and national industry events 



PICTURE WRAP-UP 





No, he's not Santa ClailS. Kids line up to meet Toby David, alias 
"Captain Jolly," emcee on the CKLW-TV, Detroit, Popeye show. In nine 
persona] appearances, Captain Jolly drew an average audience of 2,000 



At least there's no parking problem. Joseph Beres, 
WHK, Cleveland, account executive gets fast ride downtown 
on disc jockey Bill Gordon's newly purchased motorcycle 





First fall casualty, Albert Allotta of Compton's New York art 
department nurses broken leg. Accident occurred during inter-agency 
Softball game, when Al, a center fielder filling in at third base was 
dumped (luring a close play. Despite Allotta's spirit, BBDO won 



Miss Channel 17 doubles as Miss Navy Wings. Sally 
Reilly. reigning Queen of WBLF, Buffalo, is photographed by 
Vice Admiral William V. Davis, deputy chief of Naval Opera- 
tions for Air. Occasion was Naval Air Show at Niagara Falls 





Ready to go. WCDA-TV prepares to switch from channel 43 to channel 10 as part 
of FCC-ordered de-intermixture of the Albany-Schenectady-Troy market. Pogan, tv di- 
rector (1.), Mikita, comptroller (c), and Murphy, gen. manager, inspect new site 



Minimum coverage brings maximum results 
in new fashion [nr broadcast promotion. V\ 'I DF. 

Birmingham, rivaling M'.V- recent girl-in-barrel 
Muni offers added lure of a free cup of coffee 




THE KEY 

TO SUCCESSFUL 
TELEVISION 

CAMPAIGNS IN THE 

CAROLINAS... 

PROVEN TO BE 

RICH, PROGRESSIVE 

AND ... IN A BUYING 
FRAME OF MIND 



Population served 3,061,700 

Effective buying inc. $3,713,100,000.00 

Retail sales $2,385,904,000.00 

SOURCE SM 6/57 

PROGRAMMING THE BEST OF 

NBC • ABC 



wsoc 

TV 



CHANNEL 




CHARLOTTE, NORTH CAROLINA 

FULL POWER 

HIGHEST TOWER 



REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY H-R REPS. 



ATLANTA F-J REPS. 



SPONSOR • 21 SEPTEMBER 1957 



67 



, . again and again and again 

# 




INDEPENDENT 

in ^Dewe/t* 



KTLN 



Latest Pulse — June 1957 




Only ONE is atop the 

Continental Divide 

Serving both the Atlantic and 
Pacific Sides of America 

KXLF-TV4 Montana 

Butte 

Eost— The Walker Co. 

West — Pacific Northwest Broadcasters 



search department . . . Klkin Kauf- 
man, former president of Norman, 
Craig & Kummel, has joined L&N 
as senior vice president and man- 
agement account supervisor . . . 

Kenneth C. MacDonald has joined 
Ketchum, MacLeod & Grove as a 
public relations account executive 
. . . I iIm.uiIo Arguelles Campos, 
former!) with .1. Walter Thompson, 
Mexico City, has joined Rohhert 
Otto's Mexico City office in an execu- 
tive capacity . . . William N. Brown 
has been appointed an account execu- 
tive for Grant, Detroit. Brown comes 
from Campbell-Ewald . . . Norman 
Heller has been named director of 
copy and motivational research for 
D-F-S . . .Edward Ratner has been 
upped to vice president in charge of 
radio and tv for Friend-Reiss . . . 
Harvey Hiekman has joined Strom- 
berger, La Vene, McKenzie, Los 
Angeles, as an account executive. 
Hickman comes from Hal Stebbins, 
Inc. . . . William W. Vickery, for- 
merl) with Harcourt, Brace & Co., has 
joined B&B as vice president — finance 
and controller . . . Robert R. Burton 
has been named manager of K&E's 
Chicago office. Burton comes from 
NL&B . . . Sidney L. Gordon, for- 
merly with Westinghouse Electric 
Corp.. has been appointed director of 
merchandising for Erwin, Wasey, 
Chicago . . . Weber Thomas, Jr.. 
formerly with Winius-Brandon, has 
joined Gardner as assistant group 
supervisor in the media department 
and Ronald T. Levy has been named 
research assistant in the research de- 
partment . . . Hugo Scheibner has 
been appointed executive vice presi- 
dent in charge of the Beverlv Hills 
office of Cole Fischer Rogow, Inc. and 
Robey Smith, formerly with Ruth- 
rauff & Ryan, has been named vice 
president and account supervisor . . . 
Walter A. Moultak, formerly with 
BBDO has joined H B Promotions, 
Inc. . . . Daniel J. Korman has been 
elected president and treasurer of 
Cabell Eanes, Inc.. Richmond. Va. 
Korman succeeds Joseph C. Eanes. 
founder of the agenc\ . who has sold 
Ins interest in the company. 
Charles A. Black, former vice presi- 
dent of the Gordon Broadcasting Co. 
and managing director of W SAL Cin- 
cinnati, has been named vice president 
of the John J. Robinson Agency, Cin- 
cinnati . . . Irving Berk, formerh 



How Hisk 
is MP? 




WDSM-IY 



NBC* ABC Channel 6 

DITLUTH-SUPERIOR 

National Representatives 
PETERS, GRIFFIN, WOODWARD 



O 



Pulse 
March '57 



® 



in 
Negro 



Ratings 

Morning 

Afternoon 

and 

Night 

in Results 



Among Birmingham's long term 
radio advertisers, National Cloth- 
ing Company, a WJLD advertiser 
for 9 years without interruption 
says, "I am well pleased with 
WJLD as my foremost advertising 
medium.''' 



AM 



WJLD 



BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

The Notion's Finest 
Negro Radio Station 

Represented by FORJOE 



68 




head oi the agent ) beai in h 
has joined I ew in, W illiams & Sa> l"i 
.1- \ ice pi esidenl and membei "I the 
plans board . , • Raymond .). 

Koeniga has tno\ ed fi om produi i 

m^ 111. 111. i. '.I to account executive with 

C ( ary-Hill, Des VI - , Jamei 

1/ Driscoll has j id I harles Puffi i 

i . ... Chicago, -i- .1 ml execul ive. 

I ti iscoll comes from Beaumont & 
1 1 . .ii'n.ii 



r 



The) became v.p. 
Philip C. Carling al 

John II. Child* at • \W 



SPONSOR 



An army of extra sensitive ears 
works at SPONSOR to keep you 
in front of the industry and 
the industry in front of you. 

SPONSOR is the listening post 

of thousands of successful 
executives all over America 
because its very publishing 
concept (of news in brief and 
observations in depth ) has made 
it the most widely read, widely 
quoted and the best respected 
publication in the entire 
broadcast field. 

That's why men who plan 
their future read SPONSOR — 
at home. You should, too. 
Give it your unhurried time 
and it will give you so much 
more in return. One idea will 
pay you back a thousand fold. 

Now — for less than a penny 
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you can have 52 issues of 
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money back guarantee. 



' SPONSOR 










I 40 East 49 St., 


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ilii- week 
BBDO 



NETWORKS 

Calling attention t<» NBC TV's 
mammoth promotion build-up for 
its fall fjhows and the "new Benae 
of excitement" about the pro- 
graming plans on all three net- 
works, Robert Sarnoff, NBC presi- 
dent, wound up the annual t\ af- 
filiates meeting this week. 

OIIh -n» elected I" he ul ilie t\ affili- 
ates executive committee included : 

\\ alter .1. I laram, \ ice presidenl am 
general manager, \\T\I.I-I\. Milwau- 
kee, unanimously re-elected as chair- 
man. 

Jack Hani-, vice president and gen- 
eral manager of W PR( . Houston, as 
vice chairman representing the basic 
affiliates. 

Harold Essex, vice presidenl am 
general manager "I WSJS-TV, win- 
ston-Salem, as vice chairman repre- 
senting optional stations. 

Harold Stuart, presidenl of KVOO- 
T\ . Tulsa, as secretai j -treasure! 

Other members "I the executive 
i ommittee are: Ev. ing I . Kell) . presi- 
denl and general manager of K.( RA- 
TV, Sacramento, Calif.; Ralph Evans, 
executive \ ice president ol WOC-TV, 
Davenport, la.: John H. IVW itt, 
presidenl of W SM- 1 \ , Na In ille and 
Joseph II. Bryant, \ ice presidenl and 
genera] managei "I k< I'd >. I \ . Lu 
bock, Tex. 

This week sa* a rush of lasl min- 
ute entries to the fall li program 
starting gate: 

• P. Lorillard picking up Iss 
meni Foreign Legion for the ruesdaj 
10: SO-] 1 p.m. slot on < BS H . I 
inall) the adventure series was pen- 
cilled in for the 10:30-] I p.m. pei io 
Saturday as a sustainer. 

• RCA h is picked up the alternate 



HI 



*£# moK 



toi* 



KWTV 

OKLAHOMA CITY 



... is at it Rgl tin — 

measuring the 

SA1 1 Spower of K\\ I Vj 

1572' tower for 

Ka\ Jones, Young & 

Rubicam, New York. 




SPONSOR 



21 SEPTEMBER l u "i~ 



69 



Seems We Can't Teach an Old Dog 
New Tricks Eh, Smidley? 





You've done it again — failed to include Cascade! 

Great Scott. Smidley. this Cascade market is impor- 
tant. The biggest TV buy in the West. Think of it, 
man. more than a half million people served b) a 
.-ingle, four-station network. A huge three-state, 
agricultural-industrial, billion dollar market, and 
it's ours, all ours, with one buj on Cascade! Yes. and 
one of the top 75 markets in the entire nation. There, 
there. Smidley, old man. just don't let it happen 
again. 




Ct> CASCADE 



a ® 



BROADCASTING COMPANY 



NATIONAL RIP.: WEED TELEVISION 



PACIFIC NORTHWEST: MOORE & ASSOCIATES 



week portions of NBC TV's two new 
quizzes, The Price Is Right ( Monday 
7:30-8 p.m.) and Tic Tac Dough 
(Thursday 7:30-8 p.m.). Both shows 
are new nighttime versions of day- 
time starters. The buy gives RCA a 
sponsored partnership in four regu- 
larly scheduled programs this season. 

• Singer has extended its sponsor- 
ship of The Californians, Tuesday 10- 
10:30 p.m., from alternate weeks to a 
weekly basis starting with the debut 24 
September. 

• Luden's, National Carbon and 
Colgate have bought 13- week partici- 
pations in the second half of ABC TV's 
Sugarfoot, while American Chicle will 
sponsor Jim Bowie on alternate weeks. 

Tv network notes: NBC and the 

New Orleans Mid-Winter Sports As- 
sociation have signed a five-year con- 
tract for exclusive tv and radio cover- 
age of the annual Sugar Bowl Game 
in New Orleans . . . Producers and 
distributors of feature films have 
finally decided to go ahead and back 
NBC TV's coverage of the Annual 
Academy Awards presentations in- 
stead of turning over sponsorship 
rights to commercial advertisers as in 
the past. ( Oldsmobile had given the 
network a verbal order for the event.) 
The only pitch will be an opening 
stating, '"The Motion Picture Indus- 
try presents . . ." There will be no 
plugs for individual pictures . . . The 
first Lucy-Desi Hour Show will ac- 
tually run 75 minutes 9-10:15 p.m. 
\\ cdnesday 6 November . . . World 
Series Special, one shot sports 
show, will be sponsored by the Na- 
tional Carbon Co. on ABC TV Tues- 
day, 1 October, 10-10:30 p.m. . . . 
Polaroid has already firmed its net- 
work Christmas plans with buys of a 
half of NBC TV's Steve Allen Show 
i Sunday 8-9 p.m.) on 17, 24 Novem- 
ber and 8 December and one-third of 
the networks Perry Como Show on 
23 November and 7, 14 December 
. . . Sterling Drug has bought 52- 
week schedules on four NBC T\ dav- 
time shows amounting to S2 million 
in gross billings. Segments ordered 
include: Treasure Hunt. The I' rice Is 
Right, lrlene Francis Show, and Truth 
or Consequences . . . Four adver- 
tisers just signed for a total of 36 
participations on NBC T\ "s Today 
are: Bridgeport Brass Co.. California 
Prune Advisory Board. Ben-Mont Pa- 



7" 



SPONSOR 



21 SEPTEMBER 195*3 



The "JAXIE" Station . . . 

HAS THE TOP PROGRAMS TO SELL THE 
SOUTHS BOOMING V BILLION DOLLAR MARKET 




WARNER BROTHERS MOVIES 

Feature films for family viewing 
top stars and stories 




THE SILENT SERVICE 

Thrilling stories of our submarine 
combat patrols in World War III 
Sundays at 6 P.M. 




HIGHWAY PATROL 

Action aplenty . . . plus built -in 
ratings! Tuesdays at 9:30 P.M. 







POPEYE PLAYHOUSE 

am mod in a late afternoon 
day strip with Skipper At 
young viewer guests on each 
ram 




TWENTIETH CENTURY MOVIES 

Another complete feature film library 
more great stars ond stories! 




ROMPER ROOM 

Young America s favorite . . . ap- 
proved by Mothers, tool 9:00 A.M. 
week days for a full hour with 
Miss Penny. 

Plus basic NBC affiliation 



NEWS - WEATHER - SPORTS 

Complete fast coverage of oil local and 
regional events by a well-staffed, well- 
equipped experienced department. 



WFGA-TV Channel 12 



Jacksonville, Florida 



r*&>- 



Petf.rs. Griffin, 
Woodward, mc 

- 




SPONSOR • 21 SEPTEMBER 1957 



71 



23,899 HOUSTONIANS CAN'T BE WRONG 

PAUL BERLIN IS NO. 1 



RADIO PERSONALITY 



A recently completed Houston 
Press-sponsored contest found this 
popular K-NUZ disc jockey tops 
again! Paul has won every radio 
personality popularity contest in 
the Houston area since 1950. 
Two other K-NUZ personalities 
placed among the first five of the 
top 10 winners . . . adding to 
the list of "firsts" . . . 

* FIRST in Personalities 

* FIRST in News Coverage 




4&* i 



THE NO. 1 RADIO STATION- 



«£££&•* 




STILL THE 
\ LOWEST COST 
\ PER THOUSAND 
BUY! 



*oTI75* 




:i : li> 



HOUSTON'S 24 HOUR MUSIC AND NEWS 
National Reps.: Forjoe & Co. — Southern Reps.: 

New York • Chicago • Los Angeles • CLARKE BROWN CO. 

San Francisco • Philadelphia • Seattle Dallas • New Orleans • Atlanta 

IN HOUSTON, CALL DAVE MORRIS, JAckson 3-2587 



pers and Asco Electronics Co. . . . 
\BC T\ discussing half-hour show 
with Sid Caesar, perhaps, Sunday 
night, which would sell for $45,000 
gross. 

Radio network notes: E. I. du- 
Ponl de Nemours for Zerone has 
contracted to sponsor 30 five-minute 
weather -how- and fi\e segments 
weekl) of the Breakfast Club on \B\ 
starting 2H September . . . Mutual** 
new '"operation newsbeat" plan calls 
for an affiliate-network arrangement 
for on-the-spot news coverage with 
each station providing a qualified 
news reporter from its own new- desk 
for color, background and on-the-spot 
description;- of stories of national 
scope . . . ABVs newest live hour- 
long fi\e-a-week music series is the 
I/cm Griffin Show 7-9 p.m.. starting 
7 October . . . New business at Mu- 
tual include- Chrysler and H. J. 
Heinz for "Triple Advantage Plan" 
sponsorship arrangements and renew- 
als from Coca Cola for Coke Time 
starting 2(> September and the Dawn 
Bible Institute for Frank and Ernest 
starting 6 October. 
Here are the five new members of 
NBC Radio Affiliates Executive 
Committee elected this week: 

Ray Welpott, vice chairman, is sta- 
tion manager of WKY, Oklahoma 
City. 

Douglas Manship, secretar\ -treasur- 
er, is president of WJBO. Baton Rouge, 
La. 

Others: William Grant, president, 
M)\. Denver: Kenneth Haekathorn. 
\.p. and general manager, W'HK. 
Cleveland and W illard Schroeder, gen- 
eral manager of WOOD. Grand Rap- 
id-. Mich. 

People in the news: Robert H. 
Hinckley has been elected to the ex- 
ecutive committee of the board of di- 
rectors of AB-PT. Hinckle\ is a vice 
president of \BC and a v. p. and direc- 
tor of the corporation . . . Arthur W. 
Carlson has been appointed station 
research specialist for the newly ex- 
panded stations department of \BY 
Carlson comes from WDGY, Minne- 
apolis where he was handling sales- 
research . . . David A. Grimm and 
Roger O'Conner have joined \B\ 
as account executive-. Grimm comer 
from the Meeker Co. and 0"Conner 
from the katz Agencv. 






SPONSOR 



21 SEPTEMBER 19.i, 



weather's wonderful 



in Buffalo . . . when you buy it 



on WBEN-TV 



In western New York everyone is interested in weather! 
We get 41 .93 inches of rain, 1 10.7 inches of snow, and 
an average of 60 clear days, 108 cloudy and the rest 
is your guess. Temperatures go from 99° above down 
to 9° below ! 

That leaves plenty to talk about when it comes to 
weather — and no area station does a better job of 
weather-talk than WBEN-TV. 

Weather-casts at 12 noon, 5:55 p.m. and 11:15 p 
garner solid audiences and rapt attention, and your 
commercial message can reap a heap of benefit from 
both. 

Why not do something about the weather? Put your 
product amidst the highs and lows and watch the sales 
curve rise. Call Harrington, Righter & Parsons, our 
national weathermen, and let th 



WBEN-TV 



CBS IN BUFFAL 

The Buffalo Evening News Stati 




SPONSOR • 21 SEPTEMBER 195*3 



73 









^Hj 



p 



what's in a name . . . 



* •> 



f\ lot — with all due deference to the Hani. Advertising has proved it. 

More important — it obtains for people, too. You make 
your own "brand name" by how you think and what you do. And this 
very "product image" will determine how much cake you have in 
this vale of tears. 

That's why — if you're in the broadcast field, SPONSOR is 
"A MUST" to receive and read. 

SPONSOR is so necessary because of the singular, definitive 

contributions it makes to an industry that requires not alone facts, 

but a penetrating comprehension of the factors motivating the multiplicity of 

talents it employs. ITS THE ONE MAGAZINE 

RADIO AND TV ADVERTISERS REALLY USE. And the need 

for SPONSOR grows each day. It is an ever more important information center — 

an ever larger library of ideas — the compilation of the finished and the 

planned creative energies that spark the air thinking of the day 

To get the most out of SPONSOR, it should be read— AT HOME. It is 

too rich in valuable material for a quick perusal on a 

routing list. Nor does it serve its fullest function that way for you, because it is a 

publication with the kind of stuff you want to 

cut away and file — a magazine of ideas that will generate ideas in you — 

make you more valuable to yourself and others. It will bring you closer to 

the "product image" you would like your 

name to be. 



For only $3.00 a year — 52 i^nes of the 
most useful publication in the broadcast 
will he delivered to yOUT home. For less than 
a penny a day what better time buy can you 
make as an investment in your future} 



THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE TV/RADIO ADVERTISERS USE 



tfp* 




It youi time-buying formula i-.: "Let's write 
an anthem and see who stands up and 
sings." you're bound t<> have some "II 
ki \ selections. For close ha mony, se- 
lect the si a i ii m thai reaches in;<> pockets 
where $3,034,624,000.00 is stashed foi 
spending — select WBNS Radio which 
is lated first l>\ Pulse 315 times out 
of 360 Monda) thru Friday quarter- 
hours G a.m. in midnight. \sk John 
Blair. 

WBNS RADIO 

COLUMBUS, OHIO 



a great new Joplin 









a 



t^ft 



i£3 



3 



created for you by 

KODE-TV 

136,547 TV HOMES* IN THE JOPLIN MARKET 

Larger than Du'uth, Phoenix, Ft. Wayne 

$776,919,000 Buying Income; 669, £00 Total Population 

•NOW 28% HIGHER TOWER— HICHE3T IN 4 STATE COVERAGE ARE/ 6 

•NOW 29% MORE POWER— 71. COO WATTS MORE THAN 
ANY OTHER STATION IN THE AREA 

•NOW COVERS 136.547 TV HOMES IN 'OPLIN 
MARKET— AN ALL-TIME HIGH 

"Television Magazine Set Count, July, 1957 

You'll have more luck with KODE-TV JOPLIN, MO. 



316,000 WATTS Designed Power ^ / 

101 miles Northeast of Tulsa • 150 miles South of Kansas City 

203 miles East of Wichita • 250 miles Southwest of St. Louis 




tiNS'' 



Harry D. Burke. V. P. & Gen'l Mgr. 
Represented by AVERY-KNODEL 



A Member of the Friendly Croup • KODE, KODE-TV, joolin . WSTV, WSTV-TV, Steubcnville • WPIT Pittsburgh 

• WPAR. Parkersburg • WBOY. WBOY-TV Clarksburg 



COMMERCIALS 

Hamm's & PieFs Beer continued 
to lead the ARB's list of best-liked 



commercials. Here 


the July 


standin 


g: 




1. 


Hamm's Beer 


14.0 


2. 


Piel's Beer 


8.6 


3. 


Dodge 


7.2 


4. 


\\ inston 


3.4 


5. 


Kevlon 


3.2 


6. 


Gillette 


2.7 


i . 


Alka-Seltzer 


2.5 


Q 
O. 


PI) mouth 


2.3 


9. 


Schlitz 


2.2 


in. 


Chesterfield 


2.1 


11. 


Ballantine 


1.9 


11. 


Falstaff 


1.9 


11. 


Ford 


1.9 


11. 


Kraft 


1.9 


15. 


Ipana 


1.5 


16. 


Hush 


1.4 


16. 


Ivorj 


1.4 


18. 


Lipton 


1.2 


18. 


Zest 


1 2 


20. 


Bardahl 


1.1 


20. 


Dr. Pepper 


1.1 


22. 


Camels 


1.0 


22. 


Lincoln-Mercury 


1.0 


22. 


Snowdrift 


1.0 


22. 


Tonette 


1.0 


Note: 


Hush. Lipton ai 


d Zest show 


up on the popularity list 


for the first 


time. 







Logofilm. new process for remov- 
ing and replacing sponsor (and 
other) identification, has been de- 
veloped by Filmcraft. 

Logofilm was successfully used this 
summer on The Best of Groucho 
I !\ BC TV i for replacing DeSoto- 
Plymouth identification with Toni's 
Prom, the new alternate sponsor on 
the quiz series. 

Filmcraft says the new restoration 
process removes existing sponsor, title 
or trademark identification: replaces 
any identification permitting later 
sponsor insertions: cleans and sharp- 
ens the photographic image and makes 
handlettered titles photographically 
at ahout half the cost of present sys- 
tems. 

REPS 

H-R Representatives has added 
Hal Chase to the sales staff of its 
San Francisco office. 

Chase has been with MCA-TV for 
the past three years: was previously 
sales and general manager for several 
\\ esl coast radio stations. 



76 



SPONSOR 



21 SEPTEMBER 195' 







promoted exclusively on station, 
draws spectacular crowds for advertisers 



Larry Hewlett, vice president of Wallace 
E. Johnson, Inc., home builders, writes us: 
Nearly everybody in Memphis and the 
Mid-South must listen to WMPS because 
it seemed that nearly everybody attended 
the Open House (including over 3.000 
people who came in the rain on the final 
Sunday). Mr. Johnson, the president of our 
company, said WMPS has accomplished in 
ten days what would normally have taken 



ten years. We have constructed thousands 
of homes and have had hundreds of model 
home showings, but nothing has ever com- 
pared with the unprecedented attendance 
during the WMPS DREAM HOME open 
house August 23 through September I." 

Successes like this show why WMPS has 
more local and national advertisers than 
any other station in the Mid-South. 



// 



Keep your eye on these Plough, Inc. Stations: 
Radio Baltimore | Radio Boston [ Radio Chicago I Radio Memphis 



WCAO WCOP rVJJD 

REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY RADIO-TV REPRESENTATIVES. INC 

NEW YORK CHICAGO LOS ANGELES BOSTON ATLANTA SAN FRANCISCO SEATTLE 

7 E. 47 St 75 E. Wacker Dr. Ill N LaCienga Blvd Statler Office Bldg. 217 Glenn Bldg 110 Sutter St. Tower Bldg 
MU 8-4340 Fl 60982 OL 5 7597 HU 2 4939 JA 2 3872 GA 1 6936 R 1868 





SPONSOR 



21 septi Mini; L93 . 






John Blair & Co. has appointed 
Austen G. Smithers as an account 
executive in its New York office. 

Smithers comes to Blair from the 
Edward Petrj Co. Prior to that, he 
was radio sales manager for Headley- 
Read. 

Headley-Reed is expanding its or- 
ganization. Charles D e m p s e y 
joins the New York tv sales staff, 
coining from Crosley's WLW 
group. Howard Selger also has 
been assigned to this office; he 
was senior analvst for ABC in New 
York. 

Win. Shaw heads up the new office 
in St. Louis. He formerly covered this 
territory out of the firm's Chicago 
office. 

Richard Kelliher has been added 
to the sales staff of the San Francisco 
office. 

George Crumbley now manages 
the Atlanta office. He came from WSB 
and WSB-TV. 

In addition, the Hollywood office 
has moved to larger quarters in the 
Taft building. 

New appointments: The Holling- 
bery Co. gets WWTV, Cadillac, 
Mich. . . . The Meeker Co. now reps 



WBRD, Bradenton-Sarasota, Fla. . . . 
Headlcv-Rced now handles WSBA, 

and WSBA-TY. York. Pa Walker 

Representation Co. for WIYK. 
Knoxville, Tenn. . . . MeGavren 
Quinn to rep KWDM, Des Moines 
. . . Hollinghery for KXOC, Chico, 
Calif. . . . FM Unlimited has been 
appointed rep by seven FM stations: 
WBAI, N. Y.;WPJB, Providence; 
WFMB, Nashville; W F M R, Mil- 
waukee-; KCFM, St. Louis; KPFM. 
Portland. Ore.; KRCW, Santa Bar- 
bara. Calif. . . . 

RADIO STATIONS 

Here's a success story from KICO, 
El Centro, Calif.: 

At the bottom in a three-station 
area and at the beginning of summer. 
the station in two months was able to 
show the highest cash income in over 
a year by revamping its program 
schedule. 

One of the most successful ventures, 
Luncheon at the DeAnza, was a live 
audience show in a local hotel dining 
room. Ordinarily during the summer 
heat, the dining room was lucky to 
serve 12 meals at noon. With the ad- 




Folks drop everything for M W \ ma I || radio 

1st seven straight months in Washington, D.C.— 1st in share of 
total weekly audience, 6 A.M. to midnight — 1st in quarter hour wins 

PULSE: January through July, 1957 Represented nationally by John Blair & Company 



vent of the program the room now 
serves 30 to LOO meals each day, while 
the station itself tops listening au- 
dience. By adapting a big city type 
show to a smaller community KICO 
has helped rebuild its prestige and 
standing. 



Personnel notes: Kenneth Berry- 
hill has been named new manager of 
W \IOX, Meridian, Miss. Bern hill 
comes from WMCT, Memphis . . . 
Dave Hartman, formerly with 
WMAN, Mansfield, 0., has joined 
\\ HBC. Canton. 0., as a sales rep . . . 
Jim Sondheim has been promoted 
to national sales manager for WAAT, 
Newark . . . Donald Beggs has joined 
WBC as program coordinator for it> 
FM stations . . . Walter "Spanky" 
Reese, sales service coordinator, has 
been named production manager at 
WEHT. Evansville. Ind. . . . James W. 
Belcher, formerly with WWJ-AM& 
TV, Detroit, has been named to head 
uj) the newly created publicitv depart- 
ment for KYW, Cleveland . . . Harold 
C. Sundberg has been promoted to 
director of radio sales director at 
WMBD, Peoria . . . Malcolm S. 
Richards has been promoted to 
sales manager for WING, DaUon 
. . . Don Dean has been promot- 
ed to station manager of WABJ. 
Adrian, Mich. . . . Russell Gohring, 
manager of WPON, Pontiac, Mich., 
has been named a vice president of 
the Gerity Broadcasting Co. . . . Rob- 
ert W. Cessna has resigned from 
Gerity Broadcasting to establish a ra- 
dio consulting firm in the middle west 
. . . Lee Vincent has been named 
sales manager of WILK. Wilkes-Barre 
. . . Richard D. Morgan, formerly 
radio-tv director of Lewis E. Wade 
Advertising, has joined WPTA, Ft. 
W avne. as director of sales service . . . 
Bill Morgan has resigned as an execu- 
tive of the McLendon Corp. to become 
manager of K1XL, Dallas . . . Royal 
McCullough has transferred over 
from WSM-TV, Nashville, to WSM 
Radio as director of public relations 
. . . Lenard Sait, formerly with 
\\\RC, New Rochelle, has joined 
WLIB, New 7 York, as an account execu- 
tive . . . Art Maier has left NBC to 
join \\ CBS. New York, as promotion 
writer . . . Way Fullington. former 
W IRE. Indianapolis, promotion direc- 
tor, has resigned to join BM1 . . . 
James B. Holston. Jr.. has been 
named program director of Vi ANE. I- 1. 



78 



SPONSOR 



21 SEPTEMBER 1957 



The big 1/5 of a big nation 







♦»-' 










v*tw* 










'1 i 



*-- 







1/5 of total Canadian retail sales 

are made in our Hamilton -Toronto 
Niagara Peninsular coverage are£ 

. . . the actual figure is $2,722,91 1,000.00. Effective October 1, 1957 CI ICI [-TV will increase its power to 
150,000 watts. We will serve the complete Hamilton-Toronto-Niaijara Peninsula area close to 600,000 
tv homes — 24.43', of the total TV sets in Canada. The 2,552.715 people within our coverage area will 
spend $556,732,000 for food; $76,848,000 for drugs; $126,133,000 for furniture. Total retail sales $2,722.- 
911,000.00. By far the richest market in Canada. Source: Sales Management: Elliott Haynes 



CHCH-TV channel 11 

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CALL M ntrea] IA ■ 1868 • Toront. 16 • Hamilton: JA. 2-1121 • Vancouver: 1 

2-61 ¥0 • San Francisco: Yu 6-6769 




Canada 



:cago: 



Buying 

Sacramento, 

California? 



NEW, 1957 

NIELSEN 

COVERAGE 

STUDY 

AVAILABLE! 



KCRA-TV 

Consistently 
Delivers 
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In 31 Counties 
Throughout the 
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»NCS 2A. Spri»», 1957 



Ask Petry for Coverage 
and Audience Data on 
the Highest Rated 
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in the West 



KCRA-tv 



SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 



The Only low Bond 

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Grtof Central Volley 




CHANNEL 



Wayne. Holston comes from WBAA. 
Purdue University . . . F. Robert 
Fenton, formerK with WINS, New 
York, has joined \\ PGC, Washington, 
D. C, as v.p. in charge of sales. 
W. M. H. "Bill" Smith, former sales 
manager for W BKK. Chicago, is now 
midwest sales rep for Rollins Broad- 
casting, Inc. 

TV STATIONS 

Tv applications: Between 9 and I I 
September two applications for new 
stations were filed and one construc- 
tion permit granted. 

Applications were made by: Cen- 
tral Minnesota Television Co. for 
Channel 7, Alexandria. Minn.. 26.6 
kw visual, with tower 1104 feet above 
average terrain, plant $322,442. yearl) 
operating cost $152,000 and Television 
Corp. of America. Honolulu for Chan- 
nel 8, Wailuku. Hawaii. 3.67 kw vis- 
ual, with tower 6097 feet above aver- 
age terrain, plant $38,900. yearly op- 
erating cost $36,400. 

Construction permit went to: Cop- 
per Broadcasting, Butte. Mont., for 
Channel 6. Butte. Permit allows 12 
kw visual. 

New call letters: KTUL-TV are the 

new call letters for KTVX. Channel 8 
which has just shifted from Muskogee. 
Okla. to Tulsa. 

Job notes: Frank Tuoti has been 
named director of advertising, sales 
promotion and research for WPIX. 
New York. Tuoti has been assistant 
manager of the department for the last 
two years . . . Gustave Nathan, com- 
mercial manager for WKNB. West 
Hartford, Conn., has been promoted 
to the new post of director of sales de- 
velopment for WNBC Television and 
WKNB . . . Gene Lewis, former sta- 
tion manager at KCEN-TV, Temple. 
Tex. has joined KFDA-TV. Amarillo 
as sales manager and George Davis 
has joined the local sales staff of 
KFDA-TV. Davis comes from the 
DA-CAL Sales Co. . . . Don Peterson 
and Ron Scott of WOI-TV, Ames-Des 
Moines, have been promoted. Peterson 
now becomes national sales manager 
and Scott replaces Peterson in sales 
ser\ ice . . . Ross Newby has been 
named national sales manager for 
KOSA-TV, Odessa, Tex. Newby comes 
from KFDA-TV, Amarillo where he 
was -ales manager . . . Lyle R. Allen. 
formerK tv director with WITVTV. 
Washington. N. C. has joined WLW-I, 






■s> 



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3825 Bryan ■> TA 3-8158 • Dallas 



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REPRESENTED BY AVERY-KNODEL, INC. 



80 



SI'ONSOK 



21 SEPTEMBER L95* 



This way to Montreal 





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'captive Newfound Id nder$ 
and latest 6 B M Zkows , 
85% of all greater St.JohnS 
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OF CLASS 

it Jimmy Lynn 

it Art Curley 

it Don Marheson 

* Dom Clifton 

* Martha O'Dell 



Wilmington, Dela. 
1290 on the dial 



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itiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuuiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiii ?. 



[ndianapolis, as merchandising man- 
ager . . . J. S. "Dody" Sinclair has 

heen named station manager of WJAR- 
I \ . Providence. Sinclair formerly 
was administrative assistant to the 
vice president. 

CANADA 

A new ruting service is being in- 
troduced to Canadian advertisers, 
agencies and stations. 

It's put out by McDonald Research, 
Ltd.. whose president, Clyde H. Mc- 
Donald, was formerly research and 
development director of the Bureau of 
Broadcasting Measurement. 

Dubned Time Period Rating reports 
(not to be confused with BBM's Time 
Period Audience reports), the first 
regular study will be made during 2-8 
October in 17 metropolitan markets. 
A sample TPR report, covering listen- 
ing and viewing in metropolitan To- 
ronto during 17-23 July, has been sent 
out to likely subscribers and interested 
parties. 

Using the diary method. McDonald 
intends to bring out additional TPR 
reports in January and April 1958. 

Information to be provided in- 
cludes: projectable ratings, in-home 
station audiences by half hours, out- 
of-home radio station audiences by 
three-hour periods, in-home audience 
composition by half hours, cumulative 
audience, duplicate audience, audience 
turnover and buildup plus network 
reports. 

Minimum sample size will run from 
200 to 300 returned 7-day diaries. 

Remington Rand's electric shaver 
division is using Gunsmoke in 13 
Canadian markets on a spot basis. 

The show, which is seen via CBS 
TV stations in the Niagara Peninsula 
and the Vancouver area, will be tele- 
cast in Canada in the following mar- 
kets: Halifax, Saint John, Ottawa. 
Kitchener, London, Port Arthur, Sud- 
bury, Winnipeg, Regina, Saskatoon, 
Calgary, Lethbridge and Edmonton. 
R-R's agency, Cockfield Brown, bought 
the show from Caldwell Tv Film Sales. 

Andrew Jergens Co. has given its 
Canadian account to Vicker & Benson. 
The move was laid to the planned 
marketing expansion of the firm s en- 
tire line . . . Robert Lawrence Pro- 
ductions (Canada) Ltd., reports a 
100% increase in the production of 
filmed tv commercials. 



FINANCIAL 

Stock market quotations: Follow- 
ing stocks in air media and related 
fields are listed each issue with quota- 
tions for Tuesday this week and Tues- 
day the week before. Quotations sup- 
plied by Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner 
and Beane. 





1 in ■-. 


Tues. 




Slock 


10 Sept. 


17 Sept. 


Change 


New 


York Slock Exchange 




AB-PT 


IT 1 , 


18% 


+ % 


AT&T 


170% 


171% 


+ % 


Avco 


6% 


6% 




CBS "A" 


28% 


29 


+ % 


Columbia Pic 


18% 


18% 


+ % 


Loch > 


14% 


16 


+ 1% 


Paramount 


33 % 


34 


+ % 


RCA 


33% 


33% 


+ % 


Storer 


23% 


23% 


+ % 


20th Fox 


25% 


24% 


-1 


Warner Bros. 


21 


20% 


1 ., 


\\ estinghouse 


61% 


63% 


+2% 


American Stock 


Exchange 




Allied Artists 


3% 


3 


- % 


Assoc. Art. Prf 


»d. 9% 


9 


- % 


C&C Super 


% 


% 


+ % 


Diimont Labs. 


4% 


4% 


+ % 


Guild Films 


3% 


3% 


- % 


NTA 


7% 


7% 


+ % 




AFFILIATED with KROD-600 kc (SOOOw.K, 
Owned & Operated by El Paso Times, Inc 



Rep. Nationally by the BRANHAM COMPANY 



82 



SPONSOR 



21 SEPTEMBER 1957 




■ 




(Based on Measured Contour Map by Jansky & Bailey) 

5 of Virginia's Busiest Cities are 
within WTAR-TV's Grade-A Signal. 



YEARS All RAD ! 



When the Mayflower reached Plymouth in 1620, the Susan 
Constant had arrived and planted a colony at Jamestown 
13 years before. 

Like the Susan Constant. WTAR-TV was first ... in Tide- 
water Virginia. Nearly eight years ahead, as the area's domi- 
nant VI 11 station . . . and that's a lot of television hist < 

Valuable equipment in any station is experience. And that is 
an important plus value advertisers ect on WTAR-TV, the 
foremost communications medium in \ irginia's greatest, and 
America's 27th, metropolitan market! 

WTAR-TV 

CHANNEL 3. NORFOLK, VIRGINIA 

Business Office and Studio — 720 Boush Street, Norfolk. Va. 

Telephone: Madison 5-671 1 

Representative: Edward Petry & Company, Inc. 



SPONSOR • 21 SEPTEMBER 195' 



83 




UlAkiiWlMSUiMU 



srmppmw&m 













The smaller radios act 



the larger radio gets. 


















WMT 

CBS Radio for Eastern Iowa 

600 kc 

Mail Address: Cedar Rapids 

National Representative: TheXau A 



? 






h 



Q wmt, ceoa* ••►ios, io»* 











what's NEW at 

WEBC? 






Just about 
EVERYTHING ! 




NEW RATINGS 

show continuous increase in 
audience since Jan. 1955, 
reaching a new high of 
53.1%* of the listeners all 
day. 

! |uly-Augusr Hooper 

NEW EQUIPMENT 

at WEBC has all been re- 
placed with the best avail- 
able. Our other equipment 
was damaged by last year's 
fire making this move neces- 
sary. 



NEW 24 HOURS 
OPERATION 

with music, news and patter. 
Results already prove the 
value of this extended op- 
eration. 



NEW OFFICES 

Our new offices have been 
completed . . . arranged for 
top efficiency. Visit us when- 
ever you can. 







WEBC 

FIRST IN DULUTH & SUPERIOR 

Representative Geo. P. Hollingbery 



86 



SPONSOR 



21 SEPTEMBER 1957 



\l'luit'\ happening in V. S. Government 
that affects sponsors, agencies, station* 



WASHINGTON WEEK 



21 September The main spotlight, aa far as the It' is concerned, continues to be on fee tv. 

sponsor publications inc. If ''"' KaIIc iii.iilr l>\ Chairman Jiilin ( '.. Doerfer before It 1 1 S in New V>ik the 

week is a clue, the Commission in its current deliberations aboul granting .< trial for tin- pa) 
system is "I ilii- bent of mind: Determine what it think- i-inht and not l«i itself l>< 
i ► i i - 1 1 « <l by what Congress think-. 

\\ iih the FCC dominated b) this mood, it looks as though it's just a matter of setting 
the place and time for a fee tv test. 



The Senate Small Business Committee delivered the expected blast al the FCC 
for letting the daytime stations 1 petition for longer hours gather dust 

I In- committee's report scolded: 

• The 10-year dekrj in reaching a decision on the petitions was inexcusable. 

• The commission had the choice oi coming to a quick conclusion "i forcing Con- 
gress to take a look at the entire system of radio allocations with a view to doing l>\ legisla- 
tion what the FCC should already have done. 



\ Philco protest against the license renewal granted W RC-AM-TV, NBCs Phil- 
adelphia O&O, was tossed out by the FCC. 

Philco charged that the action should have been held up because (1) RCA had been 
involved in numerous anti-trust actions, and (2) ownership of the Philadelphia outlet- -he- 
RCA an unfair competitive advantage in the sale of radio and l\ sets. 

Retorted the FCC: The Commission would have to await court decisions and no! a< t 
on "unresolved complaints." The competition argument did not qualif) Philco as .i "*] >.i rt \ 
at interest and would, in the long run. open the wa) for even washing machine 
operators to try to block RCA from operating station-. 



The Craven Plan for case-by-case consideration of any h application for am 
channel in am cit\ (providing mileage separation- are met I is at lea«t temporarily out 
the window. 

It did not create the industry enthusiasm anticipated. <>nl\ (di^ had \er\ much 

in the wa) of favorable comments about it. 

Last week the FCC voted to a-k it- staff t i draw up papers t" dismiss the whole thing. 
While the final vote is -till to be taken, it appears that the tentative vote will stand. 



Subscription tv continues to hold it> place in the new-. 

Henry Ran. president of Washington Broadcasting, has asked the D. C. Commissioners 
for permission to try a wired system in Washington. The Ran proposal undoubted!] will 

result in some expression- from Congress on wired -\-u ■m-. and maj give a clue as t" whether 
Congress will pass laws if wired pay-tv succeeds. fSuch a system is outside Federal regula- 
tory powers at the present time.) 

Meantime a new company, Teleglobe, filed t"i FCt approval of a combination wired 
and over-the-air system. Wires would carry only the audio. Picture- would be tele- 
cast i anybod\ could ■j.ci the unscrambled pictures l"i free). The) would have to call up 
and he connected to net the sound, however. 



SPONSOR • 21 SEPTEMBER 1957 



GETTING THE MOST FRO 



"Snagged" by a F\ 

Faulty Film Situation? ^ 




fOUR FILM DOLLAR 





If so, you've a right to be "hopping mad" — especially if picture "smog," 

inflexible film presentations and high operating costs are 

blocking your progress. Better do something about it! Find out how to . . . 

1. Get the kind of picture quality that advertisers and television 
audiences want. 

2. Get this picture quality and enjoy low operating costs at the same time. 

3. Get the kind of expert programming that sparks and holds 
viewer interest. 



Let us show you how to plan your system to get 
these desired advantages. See your RCA Broad- 
cast Representative. Have him acquaint you with 
RCA's comprehensive TV Film Facilities — for get- 
ting better pictures and lower operating costs for 
both Color and Monochrome. 





Tmk(s^ & 



RADIO CORPORATION of AMERICA 

BROADCAST AND TELEVISION EQUIPMENT 
CAMDEN, N J 

In Canada: RCA VICTOR Company Ltd., Montreal 



A round-up of trade talk, 
trends and tips for admen 



SPONSOR HEARS 



21 SEPTEMBER 

Copyright 1957 
SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INO. 



Ted Bales apparently is in the process of reorganizing its tv-radio services. 

It's been asking friendly questions of some of its major agency colleagues, indicating 
such a move is afoot. 



Australian tv soon may be scheduling kines of American "live" shows. 
Two under discussion are Perry Como and Steve Allen. 



Talking of tv's sales impact, the marketing head of a major ad agency made this 
pithy observation to a colleague this week: 

"You want people to try your product sooner or later. Tv makes them do 
it sooner." 



Nat King Cole's blast at Madison Avenue this week for failure to sell his 
NBC TV show ignored, admen noted, the Street's past record in his behalf. 
Examples : 

• Two and a half years on the Kraft Music Hall (JWT). 

• Two years on NBC Radio as star of his own show for Wildroot (BBDO). 



FCC chairman John C. Doerfer was asked this week what the Commission's 
policy would be on the acquisition of tv stations by film companies as the result of 
unpaid obligations. 

Doerfer's answer: The Yardstick in such cases will be the same as anv other — Is it in 
the public interest? 



A Madison Avenue agencv is mulling a new use for old-line radio personalities. 
It would put them on the personal-appearance circuit as entertainers and goodwill 
ambassadors. 

Their main function Avould be to attend sales meetings at the grassroots. All this is 
based on the premise that everybody likes to get acquainted with a "name." 



Clear the decks for another type of "Dichter" — motivation researcher James 
Vicary and his doctrine of "subliminal projection." 

Vicary is the high priest of a real "hidden persuader" technique. In tv it would work 
this way: During a filmed commercial, a pictorial flash would be included which the 
eye wouldn't register; but the effect on the subconscious would suffice to prompt a sale. 



Pabst Beer this week has a logical answer to columnists' barbs about using a 
couple of repeats during the 13-week summer run of the George Sanders Mystery Theatre. 

It seems that after the series got started, the advertiser learned that two of the 
films contained barroom scenes showing people drinking — of all things — hard 
liquor. 

Thais win two of the films had to be repeated. 



90 



SPONSOR 



21 SEPTMMBEK 1957 



rth Carolina's INTERURBIA 



The Greatest Concentration of Consumer 
Buying Power in the Two Carolinas! 




flit*! -«lW° . Y ° <*<- 1 p M 

dominated by wfmy-tv 

Interurbia— The heart of North Carolina's Prosperous Piedmont . . . YOURS with WFMY-TV! 

First in population . . . First in total retail sales' Call your \l R I' man tor full details 
on WFMY-TV coverage of INTERURBIA PLUS the big Industrial Piedmont' 

/ 54 Prosperous Counties / 2.2 Million Population 
/ $2.8 Billion Market / $2.2 Billion Retail Sales 




WFMY-TV . . . Pied Piper of the Piedmont 
"First with LIVE TV in the Carolinas" 



ujfmy-tv 

GREENSBORO. N. C. 

Repretented by 

Harrington, RigMer 4 Parsons, Inc. 

New York • Chicago • San Francisco • Atlanta • Boston 



Basic 




Since 1949 



SPONSOR 



21 SEPTEMBER 1951 



91 



AGENCY MERGERS 

[Continued from page 33) 

able to them," says Dave Williams. 

The merged agency is billing at a 
rate "I $73 million to *!><) million, with 
some 35 ( ! of il in t\ and radio. How- 
ever, while most of R&R's tv billing 
comes out <>l New ^ <>rk (although 
Chicago i- important for the agenc\ I, 
I ruin. Wasey's big tv department is 
the agency's L.A. production office. 

"We've found surprisingly little du- 
plication. On the contrary, our people 
and accounts complement each other 
very well," says Williams. 

Each of the agencies, according to 
their top executives, had already been 
knee-deep in marketing planning for 
their package goods accounts. But for 
both, a big factor in the merger was 
the fact that together they will have 
more top-level people in New York, 
and in the various regional offices as 
well, who can work on a top market- 
ing level with sales and advertising 
managers. 

"All business is local," says Wil- 
liams. "And, to boot, only unusual ad- 
vertisers today can afford network tele- 



vision. Therefore, if you're set up to 
buy shrewdly on the local level, you've 
gained a major advantage." 

There's no question but that a small 
agenc\ can be profitable and even more 
so than a giant one under certain cir- 
cumstances. Carl S. Brown, for exam- 
ple, is an outstanding example of such 
a shop. However, its profitabilit\ 
stems from the fact that it is dominated 
by one account, which is a major net- 
work client and requires less staffing 
than a large number of accounts with 
small billing would. 

The R&R-Erwin, Wasey merger was 
based on a different theory of growth 
and profitability . 

"We like diversification." says Wil- 
liams, "because we feel it is better for 
all clients, giving them a richer cross- 
fertilization of creative thinking." 

It also makes the merged agency less 
\ uluerable to account loss and gives it 
a greater scope in terms of new ac- 
counts it is staffed to attract. For one 
thing, it makes it possible for the 
agency management to put either more 
or entirelv different talent in an ac- 
count group against a particular client 
problem. 



There's the added advantage of inter- 
city cross-fertilization through shifting 
men from one branch office to another. 
In fact, when a merger occurs between 
agencies in different cities (e.g. C&W 
with Ivan Hill. Chicago and Brisacher, 
Wheeler, San Francisco), one of the 
first things the new management does 
is to move certain key people into the 
office where they can both impart their 
experience and assimilate the experi- 
ence of the other agent \ . 

\\ bile the number of mergers in the 
agency field has been picking up speed 
over the last year, the same trend has 
been operating in other service fields 
and in industry as well. 

As in industry, agency mergers are 
generally brought about in top secrecy 
and on the loftiest management level. 
There are two ways the idea is born: 
( 1 I either through open solicitation bv 
a "merger doctor"; (2) or, on a top 
management level where there is aware- 
ness of problems to be solved through 
a merger. 

When a "merger doctor" is involved, 
he is very likely to have thought the 
prospective agency's problem through 
and to have an idea about approach- 







^m 



TV in Fresno - the big 
inland California market -- 



means 



KMJ-TV 



• Best local programs 

• Basic NBC-TV affiliate 












PAUL H. RAYMER, NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE 




92 



SPONSOR 



21 SEPTEMBER 1957 



able agencies thai would I"- suitable foi 
a merger. Nonetheless, it ma) take 
several months t" a ye u I" Fore .1 mei 
ger i- finall) effect! d, "t the lettei ol 
intent between the pi incipals is Bigned. 

More often the idea "I mei ging starts 
growing right within the agencj ;ii top 
management level. In tl e 1 ase "I R&R 

Mich an intent began i" be run id 

about t w < • oi more years ^-0. Some 
oi the agenc) principals who had dis- 
cussed the concept began leaking the 
idea discretelj with the intention ol 
I utting "in feelers foi prospe 1 i >. e mer- 
ger partners. 

\\ hen there is no definite middle 
man appointed I" work out a meeting 
of agenc) heads, the -< oul ng out can 

take a l<»i longei . F ne 1 ing, som ■ 

potential parties to mergers sh) awa) 
\ci\ fast il the news leaks I ecause the) 
consider merger talk as a "distress sig- 
nal." It becomes ver) difficult, there- 
Fore, for the principals >>f the h\" 
agencies that might be interested to gel 
together without "giving awa) i'>" 
much." 

Once tlic conditions "I the mergei 
(generall) an exchange "I stock al 

hook value- 1 and the initial problems 
have been agreed upon and ironed out, 
a letter of intent is signed which states 




MY MOMMY 
LISTENS TO^Vj 

KITE 

More Mommies and 
Papas in Sgi% LXruxnUO' 

Listen Daily to KITE Than 

to Any Other Station^ 

^NCS -2 
Call Avery-Knodel, Inc. 



thai thi mergei will take placi within 

a given 1 • ..I tw onl 

proi idin i! e a< 1 u itan - ! nd 1 al 
stated 1 ond 1 ons prevail in ea< h a 
1 \ . Such a letter ol intent I < 
binding a t contrai if I c ac< unts 
work checks "ut. 

Fnis is the point u Inn some ol th 
more 1 i< ' li sh pi oblems pop up. 

How to organize the new met 
o] eration ? Ine\ itably, there - some 

chad H 1 od to I e dl and out ol 

.in- .'. ■ 'i i ments as well a 1 d< 

. iplicati n in responsil ilities ind Fun 

1 - 1 > be -1 1' rd over. 

R&R and Ei vi in, \\ ise in 
inning to tackle thes pi oblem9. I he 
ha\ e not \ el foi mulated final plans fo 
the drln c ition ol responsibilities in ih 
i\ -radio depai tments, foi insta 
1 e irge Wolf heads up the R&R Mew 
"i oik h dej artme it, h hile Rolo Kuntei 
is l.ru in. \\ ase) - Mew York h hea ' 
Both agencies ha\ e sepai ate men 
ing t In i r t hicago and L.A oj eral ions 
R&R - ( .hicago i\ -radio head is 
Anderson ; Ei w in, \\ ase ■ - is I 
Moore. In I.. \. law in, \\ ase ' 1 
big t\ -radio office u idet Rol e 1 I 
while R&R maintains a one-man sen 1 
in that cit) . 

I he problems ol c< nflicting responsi- 
bilities are more likel) t 1 occur on the 
department head level and sometimes 
it i> the insolubilit) ol such problems 
that blocks a merger. In the ideal sit- 
uation, the merging agencies have 
strengths and weaknesses in different 
departments. When there's a great dis- 
parit) in size ol billing ol the two 
merging agencies, ihi~ i~ usualh auto- 
maticall) the case since the department 
he ids ol the -mailer shop are unlike! 
to ha\ e the i restiee to he 1 I up the 
ged departments. ^ 




THE 



^ 



WHEELING 

INDUSTRIAL EXPANSION 
STORY BOARD 



lii.lu-ii 1.1I expansion 1 - so rapid 
in the W heeling W< 
: data 1 ■ 
months ago is now obsolete. 





The best w .i\ i" reach this busy, 
prosperous market is t ! 

•1 \\ Ih'l 1\ the 

lion. \-k an) Hollingber) 

man or call \\ heelii _ ' edai 



"Henry, darling, you re back on 
KRIZ Phoenix!" 



Wheeling 7, West Vo. 

"a station worth watching" 



SPONSOR • 21 SEPTEMBER L951 



93 



mm 



m 






M 




W> 



1 



■ i ■ 




Richard A. Romanelli 

Account Executive 
Foote, Cone & Belding 



u 



m 



m$r 



ice 



mm 



>m 



«*& 



*n 



I 




Charles Hofmann 

Media Group Supervisor 

Foote, Cone & Belding 




Paul E. Clark 

Timebuyer 

Foote, Cone & Belding 



_^ L_ 



*J 





."^^^ 



I 



A. G. Huber 

Assistant Director, Domestic Advertising 

Trans World Airlines 



mrnl .ire (hi- important members <>t the advertiser — 
bene) team responsible tor the purchase ot time foi I W \. 



1 \ 




RO 



Have you ever looked .it youi station as you would 
at a bar of soap? 

They're the same in a sense. Time, too, is a product 
and as .1 consumer don't you general!) choose a brand you 
know? National advertisers and agencj men are consumers as 
well, The) buy time. I lies, too, buy what the) know. So — 

doesn't it make sense to let them know about you? I specially 

today — with 3500 stations competing lor shell space in a 
buyer's mind. 

This is the age o\ pre-selling and broadcasters arc no 

exception. The stations that do not pre-sell ma) never sell 

national spot at all or wind up slowl) losing what the) have 
The laws of promotion work the same lor a pound of coffee or 
a minute of time. 



MORK BUYING TEAMS READ SPONSOR THAN 
ANY OTIIKR BROADCAST PUBLICATION. 

The fastest and most economical wa\ to pre-sell 
time is an advertising schedule in SPONSOR. It needn't be large 
It needn't be expensive. Even the smallest ad in SPONSOR 
is read — because every page in SPONSOR is read. It's that 
kind of a publication. The prestige publication in the field. 
It's read from cover to cover because there's something 
interest and value on every page. 

More — SPONSOR reaches not just a part — but all 
members of the all-important bu\ing team you seek to sell — 
the agency and the advertiser. Over 10092 more advertisers 
and over 15% more agenc) men read SPONSOR than an) 
other publication in the broadcast field. If you want to con- 
vince this team — SPONSOR is the most effective publication 
you can chouse* 

Ever) independent study pro ve s thrst facts W « 
shall be happy to furnish them on request. 

SPONSOR — better than an) other publication an>- 
where — sells the team that bu\s the time. 




SOR 



sells the TEAM that buys the TIME 



d radio 



and still growing 



EWSMAKERS 



m*3*r ROCKFORD KLvioaE 

ILL! NOIS 

i 




ROCKFORD 

rftea, of 

market power! 



New industries continue to come to 
Rockford . . . and companies already 
here continue to expand. That is why 
Rockford has become the NO. 1 City 
in Illinois (outside Chicago) . . . and 
a rich market for your products or 
services. Rockford is the 2nd largest 
machine tool center in the world . . . 
34th in the USA in expendable income 
. . . 36th in buying power . . . and 
13th in Postal Savings. 



and still growing 



• Survey after Survey of 14 
counties indicates Uncontested 
Dominance of Northern Illinois- 
Southern Wisconsin area by 
WREX-TV. 

• Combined rural and industrial 
following . . . ideal for test 
campaigns. 



WREX-TV 

sales power! 



WREX-TV — 'The Viewers* Choice" 
DELIVERS your message to the buyers 
in this rich industrial and agricultural 
market. 

The consistent high quality in produc- 
tion, promotion and merchandising of 
both spots and programs has earned 
many major awards for WREX-TV this 
year! For the best medium to reach this 
Rockford area market consult H-R for 
the WREX-TV story. 

J. M. BAISCH, General Manager 

REPRESENTED BY H-R TELEVISION, INC. 



"WREX-TV 
CHANNEL 13 

ROCKFORO 
ILLINOIS 








Alexander M. Tanger has been elected 
vice president of \\ HDH. Inc., as that Bos- 
ton organization readies the debut in No- 
\ ember of its new tv outlet. At the same 
time. William B. McGrath, vice president 
and managing director of WHDH-TV an- 
nounced Tanger's appointment as sales di- 
rector of WHDH-AM-FM-TV along with 
the appointment of Leslie Arries, Jr., as di- 
rector of tv. Tanger came to WHDH in 1946 as an account execu- 
tive, has served as commercial manager since 1953. He is a mem- 
ber of Radio Executives Club of New England and Ad Club of 
Boston. Arries, who will supervise station operation and coordinate 
with sales, comes from CBS Spot Sales in Chicago. He has been in 
television for 11 years and filled a variety of executive positions at 
WTTG. Washington; WDTV, Pittsburgh: and also for DuMont. 

Hulberr Taft, Jr. heads up the executive 
group overseeing Taft radio-t\ interests in 
four cities following a realignment opera- 
tion to allow for future expansion. Taft 
is now president and director of Radio 
Cincinnati. Inc.. and affiliated corporations 
in Columbus and Birmingham i \\ TVN and 
WBRC), chairman of the board of WBIR, 
Knoxville. He will be in charge of policj 

and operations of all properties, FCC contracts, network contracts, 
construction, labor relations and major equipment purchases. The 
other executive personnel of Radio Cincinnati who complete the new 
home office group are David G. Taft, executive vice president and 
director; Ken W. Church, vice president: Dorothv S. Murphy, trea- 
surer: William Hansher: assistant secretary, and Donald L. Chapin. 
head of New York sales. Taft feels centralization is necessarv. 



William H. Fineshriber, Jr. 47->ear-old 
\eteran of a quarter century in broadcast- 
ing, has been named to fill the newly-cre- 
ated post of director of international op- 
erations for Screen Gems. From his head- 
quarters in Screen Gems' New York office. 
Fineshriber will direct all the overseas mar- 
keting operations of this Columbia Pictures 
subsidiary whose international staff has 
swelled to 39 sales representatives and whose tv programs are viewed 
in 17 countries outside the I . S. One of Fineshribers first official 
acts will be a tour of the Far Fast in October, accompanied by Ralph 
M. Cohn. Screen Gems vice president and general manager. The 
purpose of the trip is to establish permanent sales offices and explore 
possibilities of producing programs in the Orient. Fineshriber was 
most recently sales \ ice president of Television Programs of America. 




SPONSOR 



21 SEPTEMBER 195' 





KCMO-TV 
WHEN-TV 
KPHO-TV 
WOW-TV 



Kansas City 

Syracuse 

Phoenix 

Omaha 



channel 5 
channel 8 
channel 5 
channel 6 






Joe Hartenbower, General Mgr. 
Sid Tremble, Commercial Mgr. 
Represented nationally by Katz Agency 
KCMO-TV . . . One of Mere- 
dith's Big 4 . . . All-Family Stations. 



O 



Meredith Stotions Are Affilioted with Better Homes ond Gordens ond Successful Forming Magazinet 



SPONSOR 



21 SEPTEMBER 1957 






3rUii 






PEAKS 



Sarnoff on summertime 

We liked the speech Bob Sarnoff made to NBC TV affili- 
ates l.i-t week in \e\\ York. It was full of optimism and 
maturity — particularly in it- recognition that Washington 
probes ma) ultimately result in fuller public understanding 
of network television's role in the broadcast medium. 

What we liked best was Bob Sarnoff's determination to 
tackle some of tv's major program problems head on. Many 
have tended to shrug off tv's summertime doldrums as in- 
r\ i table. But Bob Sarnoff sees summer as possibly becoming 
"an opener for the succeeding season, instead of the tail 
end of the old one." 

Bob Sarnoff, Bob Kintner, Manie Sacks and other key 
people at NBC will meet soon to sift ideas for next summer 
and fall. For the industry's sake, we wish them well. 

Timebuyers can win this battle 

Why should a station take the trouble to furnish reports 
on who its clients are to a central source? 

Over years of campaigning for published facts on spot 
clients and their spending, sponsor and others have advised 
stations: You will benefit from published figures because 
knowledge of what the competition is doing begets business. 

This has never been documented better than in a recent 
checkup conducted by Bob Liddel, acting head timebuyer at 
Compton, made at the suggestion of Frank B. Kemp, media 
director. Frank Kemp wanted to know whether spot tv bu-i- 
ness had been stimulated by the Rorabaugh Report (the 
data service which provides TvB spot tv spending figures). 

Bob Liddel found that: "within the recent past we have 
had three distinct instances where local spot television was 
used in the place of network, or in addition to network, and 
one of the major contributing factors in recommending these 
strategies ua> information derived from Rorabaugh Report-."" 

Unfortunately many station people do not understand that 
this sort of thing happens every week and we think it's up to 
the timebuyer to explain the value of competitive data to 
station men. By doing this, buyers insure expansion of 
reports the industry now gets from Rorabaugh and TvB — and 
prepare the wax tor report- on spot and network radio. 



THIS WE FIGHT FOR: // you don't think 

advertising needs to sell its role better, go to 
.see "U ill Success Spoil Rock Hunter?" It's 
another movie lampooning tr admen and rebut- 
tal on an organized basis is badlv needed. 




lO-SECOND SPOTS 

Lobby: Ad in N.Y. Times: 

DON'T Bl'RY CAESAR! 
Do we get Sid Caesar Back or 
Do We ha\e to throw aua\ our 
T. V. Sets/ 
Bring Back Caesar 
{And tie don't mean Julius) 
Write to: Committee for Caesar's 
Longevity, H. Machklis, 161-10 Jamai- 
ca \\e. i i in. 516), Jamaica. N.Y. 

The ponies: To promote the new 
W estinghouse station WJZ-TV in Bal- 
timore (formerlj WAAM), two-dollar 
win tickets on Saturday's sixth race at 
I imonium track were bought for the 
press. The race: WJZ-TV Special 
Handicap. Ride 'em, disk jockey.' 

Science-fiction: From N.Y: Times — 
"A group of psychologists speculated 
yesterda\ that when man was reach to 
take off for the moon it would be a 
woman who would probahK make the 
first flight."' Maybe this news calls for 
a new show — Hop Harridan instead of 
Hop Harridan. 

Boot boom: Acme Boot Co. of Ten- 
nessee, makers of cowboy boots, attrib- 
ute spurt in sales to tv Westerns. 
Now we're waiting to hear from the 
Village Blacksmith. 

For Betty Coed: The new craze for 
old raccoon coats now sweeping the 
campuses prompted a W CFL. Chi- 
cago, contest in which these apparel 
anticjues are the prizes. Ought to tune 
in that show with a crystal set. 

Gangbuster: As thousands of Hous- 
tonians searched the city for KILT s 

S25.000 treasure check, two young- 
sters turned up a package containing 
$15,000 worth of illegal heroin. 

Goodbye, Summer: Tv Guide re- 
ports this sign in a San Francisco 
shop window: "TV sold, installed and 
serviced here. Not responsible for 
Summer programs." 

Woo, woo! \ vacationing McCann- 
Erickson copywriter reports she rocked 
her Bostonian friends when she ap- 
peared on Nantucket wearing toreador 
pants and wedgies instead of Bermudas 
and flats. Watch for a new Madison 
Avenue novel — "Girl in Tlw Tight 
titling Slacks." 

Help wanted: From \ .) . Times — 
ADVERTISING AGENCY 

Wants a girl who can type well and 
take some steno. Serve as sect\. ad- 
taker & even inspiration. 
Just the thought inspires us! 





the more you compare balanced programming, 
audience ratings, coverage, or costs per thousand — 
or trustworthy operation — the more you'll prefer 

WAVE Radio 
WAVE-TV 

LOUISVILLE 

NBC AFFILIATES 

NBC SPOT SALES, EXCLUSIVE NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES 



WFIE-TV, Channel 14, the NBC affiliate in Evansville, 
is now owned and operated by WAVE, Inc. 




YOU MIGHT SiOHE A 
"GRAND SLAM" IJV GOLF* — 



BUT . 



RADIO 



NIELSEN NCS NO. 2 
NOVEMBER, 1956 



Station 



WKZO 



Radio 
Homes 
In Area 



208,450 

106.570 



DAYTIME 



Monthly 

Homes 

Reached 



Weekly 
NCS 
Circ. 



Daily 
NCS 
Circ. 



107,490 95,520 ! 67,470 



43,420 



38,670 



25,630 



YOU NEED WKZO 

TO BREAK PAR 

IN KALAMAZOO-BATTLE CREEK AND 

GREATER WESTERN MICHIGAN! 

You just can't cover Western Michigan without WKZO . . . 
because WKZO gets the lion's share of the audience morn- 
ing, noon, and night. It delivers over 2' 2 times as many 
radio homes as the next station, according to Nielsen, and 
has almost twice the share of audience, according to Pulse. 
November, 1956 Nielsen figures at the left show that WKZO 
delivers 56% more homes daily than the second station can 
deliver monthly! 
Let your Avery-Knodel man give you the whole story. 



►*' ,v -'* 




Me @efaeb IJh/ioi;, 

WKZO-TV — GRAND RAPIDS-KALAMAZOO 
WKZO RADIO — KALAMAZOO-BATTLE CREEK 
WJEF RADIO — GRAND RAPIDS 
WJEF-FM — GRAND RAPIDS-KALAMAZOO 
KOLN-TV — LINCOLN, NEBRASKA 

Associated with 
WMBD RADIO — PEORIA, ILLINOIS 




CBS RADIO FOR KALAMAZOO-BATTLE CREEK 
AND GREATER WESTERN MICHIGAN 

Avery-Knodel, Inc., Exclusive National Representatives 



In I" ill. Bobby Jones won the I ,S. (>l>ei>. U.S. imateuT, British Open, and British Amateur. 



JMTIONAl E 

10 ROCKEFf 



28 SEPTEWb.R 19A1 
20< • copy • S3 • y*ar 

PART ONE OF 2 PARTS 




Where there's a 
Storz Station . . . there's 

DOM 




Dominance for the station . . . dominance for your 
In each of these major markets . . . 
re radios are tuned to the Storz Station than any other 

MINNEAPOLIS-ST. PAUL WDCY is first . . . all-day average. Proof: Booper 
(32.7%) . . . Trendex . . . Pulse. See Blair or General Manager Jack Thayer. 
KANSAS CITY. WHB is first . . . All-day. Prool : Metro Pulse, Nielsen, Trendex, 
Hooper, Area Nielsen, Pulse. All-day averages as high as 17.0 Nielsi See Blair 
or Genera] Manager George W. Armstrong. 

NEW ORLEANS. WTIX is first . . . All-daj Proof: Hooper (WTIX 2 to 1) . . . 
Pulse. See Adam Young or General Manager Fred Berthelson. 

MIAMI. WQAM is first . . . All-day. Proof: Hooper I 12.195 I . . . Pulse . . . South- 
ern Florida Area Pulse . . . Trendex. See Blair . . . or General Manager Jack Sandler. 




rsi 



Y'S RADIO FOR TODAY'S SELLING 



WD6Y Minneapolis St. Paul 
WHB Kansas City 
WQAM Miami 

REPRESENTED BY JOHN BLAIR & CO. 



TODD STORZ, PRESIDENT 



WTIX New Orleans 

REPRESENTED BY ADAM YOUNG INC. 



THE MARKETING 
VEEP: HOW HE 
OPERATES 

\ new figure now holds 
the i\ purse-strings as 
big-business man 
incut settles into .< 
marketing conscious 
advertising pattei n. 

Page 25 



Saturation 
and the 
new radio 

Page 28 

Will tv get its 
own "bureau 
of circulation"? 

Page 34 

New season's 
network tv 
lineup 

Page 37 



it takes all kinds 



and NBC RADIO reaches all kinds 



Some folks like music; others like- drama. People have different 
tastes in clothing, in food, in listening, too. To sell them all, you 
must reach them through the programs they respond to. 

NBC Radio's varied programming offers you every kind of listener. 

* I In lady c/ the house who enjoys soap operas can find 
them on NBC Radio dramas like MY TRUE STORY and 
ONI 1/ / \ s FA Mil). 

* 'Hit housewife alio casts her daily chores with live pop 
musu /inns in NBC Radio's HANDSTAND. 

* 'Hit imii and women who follow world events keep 
posted with MIC Radio's NEWS ON THE HOUR... and 



tin iiion thoughtful listen to LIFE AND THE WOULD 

and other analytical programs. 

* Weekenders, relaxing at home and at the wheel, enjoy 

variety on MONITOR. 
NBC". Radio's varied programming makes sure your commercials 
are heard more times by more different people. For a saturation buy 
that covers every segment of your market, nothing matches the effec- 
tiveness and economy of NBC Radio, where more people hear your 
sales messages more times. 

People arc different. But with all their differences they can still 
have one tlnng in common — war product ... when von use 



NBC RADIO 




You m £? Ul BICAM, 






Id i < rtisi/nP 



KSW >'< '/.'A' 'I//.*''' . ■ , • 




WHERE DID EVERYBODY GO? 

One second ago 18.988.132 people were out there watching their TV 
sets. Maybe if that commercial had been just a link' more fresh and 
imaginative . . . 



SPONSOR • 28 SEPTEMBER 1957 




28 SEPTEMBER 1957 • Vol. 11, No. 39 



'.-*£) %**& tbL 



THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE TV/RADIO ADVERTISERS USE 



DIGEST OF ARTICLES 

Marketing v. p.: the top tv executive 

25 Big-business ad management lias settled into a marketing-conscious 
pattern: the marketing v.p. is kr\ advertising-sales decision-makei 



Saturation and the new radio 

28 Nobod) i- in luii'; agreement on what saturation radio is— but tin- for 
certain: everybody's using it. sponsor takes a long look at the concept 

Should you drop a successful jingle 

31 I' 1 "- w.i' the problem faced by Burgcrmeister heer. Much of its adver- 
tising was keyed to long-running jingle, but strategy dictated a change 



Will tv get its own ABC? 

34 Wter live years of testing, problems and decisions, the \ \KTB has 
unveiled it- long-awaited circulation study. Will the industry buy it? 



The new season's network tv lineup 

37 October's T\ Basics section contains up-to-date data on programing. 
clients, agencies and costs for the 1957-58 network television season 



FEATURES 

16 Agency Ad Libs 

45 Film-Scope 

21 m h and Madison 

54 News & Idea \Y rap-Up 

7 Newsmaker ol the Week 

56 Picture \\ rap-Up 

66 Sponsoi Hears 

9 Sponsor-Seope 



74 Sponsor Speaks 

52 Spot Buys 

74 Ten Second Spots 

14 Timebuyers at Work 

72 Tv and Radio Newsmakers 

63 \\ ashington Week 

18 \\ omen's \\ eek 



In Upcoming Issues 

Detroit is poised 

\ roundup "I air media activitv iinong the aulomoti\es a* seen againsl 
the back drop of the 1957-58 marketing battleground 

Radio status report 

Monthlj summary of radio facts includes network clients and bai -t.i 

of network radio sales this current month compared to last 



Editor and Publisher 

Norman R. G!enn 

Secretary-Treasurer 

Elaine Couper Glenn 

VP-Assistant Publisher 

Bernard Piatt 

General Manager 

Arch L. Madsen 

EDITORIAL DEPARTMENT 

Executive Editor 

;jav;d 
News Editor 

Ben Bodec 

Senior Editors 

Alfred J. Jaffe 
Evelyn Konrad 
Jane Pinkerton 
W. F. Miksch 

Film Editor 

Barbara Wilkens 

Assistant Editors 

Joan W. Holland 
Jack Lindrup 
Lois Heywood 

Contributing Editors 

Bob Foreman 
Joe Csida 

Art Editor 

Phil Franznick 

Production Editor 

Erwin Ephron 

ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT 
New York Manager 

Charles W. God*/" 

Western Manager 

Edwin D. Cooper 

Southern Manager 

Herb Martin 

Midwest Manager 

Sam B. Schneider 

Mid-Atlantic Manager 

Donald C. Fuller 

Production Manager 

Jane E. Perry 

Administrative Staff 

Dorris Bowers 
George Becker 

Circulation Department 

Seymour Weber 
Emily Cutillo 
Estelle Schuiman 

Accounting Department 

Laura Oken 
Laura Datre 

Readers' Service 

Marilyn Hammond 



Member of Business Publications 
Audit of Circulations Inc. 



SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. 

combined with TV. Executive. Editorial, Circu- 
lation and Advertising Offices: 40 E. 49th St. 
'49th & Madison i New York 17. N. Y. Tele- 
phone: MUrray Hill 8-2772. Chicago Office: 
612 N. Michigan Ave. Phone SUperior 7-9863. Los 
Angeles Office: 6087 Sunset Boulevard. Phone: 
HOIIywood 4-8089. Printing Office: 3110 Elm 
Ave., Baltimore II. Md. Subscriptions: United 
States $3 a year. Canada and foreign $4. Sin- 
gle copies 20c. Printed in U.S.A. Address all 
correspondence to 40 E. 49th St., N. Y. 17, 
N. Y. MUrray Hill 8-2772. Published weekly by 
SPONSOR Publications Inc. Entered as 2nd class 
matter on 29 January 1948 at the Baltimore 
postoffice under the Act of 3 March 1879. 

Copyright 1957 

Sponsor Publications Inc. 



Speaking of COSTS 



• • • 







- 



WHO 

for Iowa PLUS! 

Des Moines . . . 50,000 Watts 

Col. B. J. Palmer. President 

P. A. Loyet, Resident Managei 

Robert II. Harter, Sales Manager 



Results considered, WHO costs 

less than any possible "economy 

package" in Iowa: 

More Iowa fcntiilies listen 

to WHO regularly, daytime, 

than to all the 56 

other loin/ stations COMBINED*! 

*Souree: 1956 Iowa Radio 

. \ it dii nee Sun l 1 



A* 



Peters, Griffin. Woodward, Inc., 
National Rt prest ntatix es 



WHO Radio is part of 

Central Broadcasting Company. 

which also owns and operates 

WHO-TV, Dei Moines 

WOC-TV ! 



SPONSOR • 28 SEPTEMBER 1957 



m Jr\^& I p\<^ EL V EL I % ■ 



■: 










i 



GENE AUTRY, America's favorite 
cowboy, never slows his pace. 
He keeps on passing competition. 

In four-station Chicago, where 
his syndicated series is in its 6th 
consecutive year, GENE AUTRY is 
consistently first in his evening 
time period (Gene's current rating 
is 19.3, according to Telepulse). 
Cleveland, Phoenix, Buffalo and 
Minneapolis-St. Paul, to mention 
just a few outstanding spots, 
report similar crack results. 

The reason is obvious. Westerns 
are America's favorite television 
fare (top-rated among all half-hour 

network program types) and, 

dollar for dollar, the gene autry 
SHOW, 91 fast-ridin' half -hours 
produced specially for television 
by Flying A Pictures, is the finest 
Western film entertainment your 
advertising money can buy. 

CBS TELEVISION FILM SALES, INC. 

fSj "... the best film programs for all stations" 

New York, Chicago, Los Angeles, 
Detroit, Boston, San Francisco, 
St. Louis, Dallas, Atlanta. Canada: 
S. W. Caldwell, Ltd., Toronto. 

-Nielsen 





PERSONAL SERV 



lamd o^tmi Wi 



^i 



.'•'.'•■?:*('- 



5& 



I 



^ 



SMALL CITIES & BIG FARMS. ..360,000 FAMILIES 



«l>ONSOR • 28 SKPTEMBER L951 



NEWSMAKER 
of the week 



This week) ilti' Sational tssociation of Radio and Television 
Broadcasters t which has dt'frndnl mans a position in it> 
35-year history, prepared to meet another tin rut — f< •»■ tv — 
at Harold E. Fellows, \ IRTB firt-s., barnstormed into \orth 
Carolina for tin- third of a series of meetings of broadcasters. 

The newsmaker: Harold I.. (Hall Fellows, who bas 
headed N Mill! since June- 1951, is .1 man who believes in unified 
action and a strong vocal stand when the freedom "I the broadcast 
ing industr) 1- challenged. Mr bas no doubl but thai il is seriousl) 
challenged now l>\ 1 . S. military interests in l\ channels and pai 
ticularl) b) the recent FCC announcements thai il plans to invite 
applications from broadcasters to trj oul fee t\. Uthougb F( C bas 
not committed itsell actually to the granting "I an) tests, and has 
further sidestepped the issue b) delaying an) possible grants until 

I March, il does impl) that a tesl 
ol fee h could jusl possibl) gel nil 
the ground nexl spring, li will 
never get oil the ground at all if 

I I mI Fellows can convince members 
"I \ Mi I B i'< speak oul against il 
"with one voice. 

I o encourage the raising "I tin* 
voice, Fellows i- using the currenl 
NARTB regional meetings a^ a 
sounding board against fee t\. 
"Promoters of paid television 
schemes," he told the firsl regional 
gatherings in Schenectady, "have 
sought to pre-empl the broadcasting frequencies themselves and t<> 
institute a system utterl) foreign to the American concept of broad- 
casting. You, the free-1 ideaster, and the public you serve are 

the intended victims of this invasion." 

Since the beginning ol commercial broadcasting, Fellows pointed 
out, broadcasters have been on the defensive man) times. "Quite 
possibl) this is the time," he said, "to make the transition from 
the defensive." This exhortation to Region 1 members on 17 Sep- 
tember in Schenectad) is substantiall) the same call to ami- he 
issued three days latei ti> Region I members in Cleveland and to 
Region 2 members this week in Vsheville, \. ('. In fact, In- told 
the Cleveland group thai N Mi II! feels FCC does nol have authorit) 
to authorize fee t\ . 

He will continue to call for unified action against fee i\ at the 
remainder >>| the meetings: Region 5 in Kansas City, I'M 1 October; 
Region 8, Portland, Ore., 11-1") October; Region 7. Denver, 17-18 
October; Region (>. Dallas, 22-2'i October; and Region 3, Memphis, 
24-2") October. 

Besides the threat of fee t\ and of militar) design on t\ > hannels, 
\M\II5 sessions are facing up to other threats: Increasing Con- 
gressional pressures in such directions as program control and adver- 
tising practices along with the problem of expensive music copyright 
fees. Fellows, a »alt\ new Englander and World War 1 Marine with 
25 years in broadcasting, sees one wa\ to meet them head on with 
"I nified action." ^ 




lluralil E. Fellou 










DRAMATIC 
SALES RESULTS' 

FOR ST. LOUIS 
MARKETS! 








LaSane 

covered 
a vast territory . . 

Rene Robert Cavelier, the Sieur de LaSalle, explored 
the entire Mississippi Valley, from Canada to the 
Gulf of Mexico, in the 17th century — establishing 
forts for France, planting colonies, developing trade 



today 



W6AL-TV covers ^ 



avast MARKET territory |g; 

3V2 million people "^^a- „ - 

in 1,015,655 families 

owning 917,320 TV sets — \V'{ 

earning $e ] A billion annually ~Z~ 

buying consumer goods that add up to 
$3% billion annually in retail sales *-— ^ 



It's the coverage that makes WT3AL-TV — ^^_> 
America's 10th TV Market! 



five: The MEEKER Company, Inc. New York • Chicago • Los Angeles • San Franc 



SPONSOR • 28 SEPTEMBER 1957 






\lu\t tignificant tx and radio 

newt of the week with interpretation 

in depth for busy readers 



SPONSOR-SCOPE 



28 SEPTEMBER Thai cock) little contender from Hoi yoke, Max-. — Lestoil — ilii- week marched 

woNsoR Publications inc r hj B ' m, ° champ I'txC.'s own ring with a saturation campaign on .ill Cincinnati t\ sta- 

dons. 

This irritating tactic shouldn't surprise P&G, which mighl well la) claim t<» hav- 
ing invented it. For man) years Lever Bros, burned hmt the fact thai P&G, wiUi 
extra pressure, was aide to dominate the Boston-Cambridge market, Lever's homi 
i itorj . 

Incidentally, Lestoil will hold open house for reps 7 October when it- new Hoi- 
\i)kc plant will be dedicated with ;i four-da) celebration. 



\ Harrington-Righter-Parsons presentation is the major reason «h> Nick i- 
dishing out $400,000 for tv spot this fall. 

Mor>«> International openl) si\« so. Dial agency's Ra} WcCardle told SPONSOR- 
SI OPE tlii- week: "The storj we got From John Dickenson, of Harrington-Righter-Par- 
sons, \\a- the biggest single force in changing < > u t strategy to include t\ spot. It showed us 
how we could put extra weighl behind our daytime network campaign at the right 
price." 

The t\ spot l>u\ is in behalf of Vaporub. It will run for 1<"> weeks in 28 top markets. 
Originally Vick had planned to put all of it- $1.5 million on daytime CBS TV. Now the net- 
work share has hern sliced to $1.1 million. 

\ iek also has earmarked 81.7 million for spot radio in behalf ol it- cough- 
drops, using 41 market- for an average of 18 weeks. 

Vick's spot tv buj prompted rep- to philosophize that: 

1) You <an gel business For yourself as well as your colleagues if you plan, pitch and 
fight for it on an industry level. Spol radio's comeback shows the value of teamwork. 

2) Vick's action may portend a change in advertisers 1 spending plan taking 

some mone) away from network tv and giving it to spot, instead of vice-vei 



A tv station in a major market still ran depend on plenl\ of national -pot busi- 
ness — despite some recent gloom. 

WTIC-TV, Hartford, (channel 3), bowed on this week with 1197,000 worth 

of national spot billings on the books sight unseen. 



Nielsen will issue a statement next week answering critic* of it- new format 
for local radio station reports. 

The statement will make note of this: The project is based on suggestions and prefer- 
ences obtained via a survey of 230 timehuyers. 

One of the format's hitter critics. \dam Young, Inc., in an analvsis relea-ed la^t week 
questioned the format'- effect iveiv - tool for Inner-. 

Concluded \dam Young: "Unless provision is made in tiie radio reports to include data 
relevant to modern buying concepts, namely, trading area data, the qualitative material is 
of little value." 

The rep's implied complaint: The format is weighted in favor of the powerhouse 
station, on the one extreme, and the small station, on the other, and against the re- 



SP0NS0R • 28 SEPTEMBER 1957 



~ SPONSOR-SCOPE continued . . . 

Here's an index of today's radio prosperity: 

The current series of NARTB regional meetings is attracting a larger percentage of 
small station people than ever before. 

Note the aristocratic type of question that stations have been shoving at their 
reps at these NARTB regional meetings: 

"Do you think all the commercials we're crowding in will hurt our effectiveness as a 
medium of entertainment and information?" 

NBC Radio's Joe Culligan soon may hear midget versions of his Imagery 
Transfer concept (which is based on 6-second announcements). 

NBC Spot Sales reports this week that one of its radio stations is experimenting with 
2-second spots. 

Action on P&G brands is so speedy and abrupt that reps make it a special 
chore at the end of each month to balance new orders against cancellations to see 

who's winning. 

It's no easy chore. A quick change on Friday may come too late to get on the rep's 
latest records and thus distort the true picture for that period. 

Here's how the September balance looked this week: Somewhat on the credit side. 

Another quick-change situation is taking place in the air media as a whole. 

You can get the feel of it from this chronology: 

SEPTEMBER 1956: Reps say tv spots during prime time in some of the top markets 
are so scarce that clients are asking about radio. 

SEPTEMBER 1957: The same reps say that daytime radio spots are so scarce in 
the top markets that clients are asking about tv. 

Buyers told SPONSOR-SCOPE this week that Hartford, Los Angeles, Detroit, Hous- 
ton, Pittsburgh, and San Antonio are among the most difficult places to find daytime 
availabilities. 

In the battle for shelf space, the plight of the small manufacturer has become 
a nightmare — because his big competitors are leaning strongly toward the concept that the 
consumer should be offered the illusion of freedom of choice. 

To do this, the big fellow gives the consumer a choice of three different types 
of packaging or five different colors or mixtures in a box of detergent. 

The small fellow's dilemma: If he limits himself to a specialty, his share of the market 
won't even be recognizable. But if he attempts to widen his line, he may be spreading him- 
self too thin. 

In a way. the freedom of choice concept is a stepchild of tv. The selling impact 
of the medium is such that the advertiser must offer some new variation of his prod- 
uct frequently enough to keep up with the parade. 

One of the pitfalls in marketing statistics, say the experts, is the habit of pre- 
senting department store sales as an index of retailing as a whole. 

Marketers point out that when that method was adopted, department stores accounted 
for about 2ft r r of national volume. Now it's less than 6%. 

Automotive merchandisers todav get 13% of the national intake while discount 
houses have grabbed huge pieces of the hard goods market. 

One show that can't complain it isn't getting the right promotional push is 
Sally, on CBS TV Sunday evenings. Chemstrand and Royal McBee. the series' alternate 
sponsors, are spending about SI 00.000 between them on ads and publicity. 

10 SPONSOR • 28 SEPTEMBER 1957 




SPONSOR-SCOPE rontinued 



CBS T\ has the largest number of regulari) sponsored nighttime shows thi- 
i.ill. while 1BC TV piled up 1 1 ■ « - biggest percentage of advertisers who sponsor the 
same program exclusively everj week. 

Here s .1 SPONS0R-S( OPE breakdown of the numbei of exclusive sponsors and sponsors 
wlni share then programs with others: 







No. 


NO 




M 1 WORK 


TOTAL SHOWS 


EXCLUSIVl SPONSORS 


( O.SPON JORS 


mi \i. SPONSORS 


ABC T\ 


3 1 


2] (7091 r 


20 


11 


CBS TV 


42 


15 (369 




70 


NBC TV 


39 


1 ; (339J 1 


50 




TOTAL 


1 12 


l«> < 10 


12.-, 


171 



"That i». J>', of IBC's shows are sponsored exclusively. 

Mi I. 11. 1 Rnbenstein's move t«» pep up distribution through sponsorship of the 
Sid Caesar show on ABC TV next year ha* the eosmetie field guessing ahout the 
Strategy involved. 

For one thing, this means an enormous increase in t% hilling-. I\l! reported 
Rubenstein as spending $54,810 on spot in 1956. The cost of time and talent fur the 
Caesai series over 26 weeks (starting Januan > is estimated at Sl.B million. 

(Rubenstein, with between 15,000 and 20,000 nutlets, recently started pushing for the 
supermarket trade with \\eekl\ magazine lavouts. 1 

For another thinu. Caesar's audience apparently i- <»" the youngish Bide: In 
March-April 1957 when the Caesar show gol a national rating of 15.3, the age breakdown 
among housewives came to: 16 to 34 years, -ii.',', 35 to 19 years, 15.995 ; and 50 years 
and older. 13.2'.' , 

Some of NBC TV's daytime prosperity this season ma\ lie traced. -a\ agen- 
cies, to the network's generosity with merchandising help when asked. 

The promotional aids include fa) material for ehainlireaks. (b) letter- to whole- 
salers, and (c) working with stations in contacting supermarket's and drug chains. 

The daytime hillings of CBS TV and NBC TV the first -i\ months kept them 
comfortably ahead of the women's magazine-. 

Here are the gross time and space comparisons: 

CBS TV 132,300,000 

NBC TV 21,500,000 

Ladies Home Journal 15,200,000 

McCafl's 11.nnn.nno 

Good Housekeeping 10,300,000 

Source: PIB. Jan. -June 1957. 

Ford Motor Co. is the only network customer with two western series this 
season. Ford's sponsorship of the sagebrush now consists of ^ agon Train and The Zane 
Grey Theatre. 

This week's alternate-week buy of Wagon Train 'NBC TV] is 8 joint Ford institu- 
tional and Edsel operation for 52 weeks. 

The factory will allocate the 13.5 million for time and talent as two-thirds in-titutional 
(K&E) and one-third Fdsel fPCB). 

I<ewis-Howe and Drackett are sponsoring the other hours between them. 

This proves asain how sharply the auto fellows plav their game: V Ford competitor 
has retained Pulse to make a special study of the impact of the Edsel commer- 
cials on the Bing Crosby-Frank Sinatra special next month. 

Pulse this week wouldn't comment on whether the assignment came from General Motors. 

SPONSOR • 28 SEPTEMBER 1957 11 






SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 






CBS Radio doesn't think the John J. Anthony show helongs on its network. 

Martin Himmel, of Pink Ice note and president of Dunnan & Jeffrey, Inc., this week 
offered to buy five nightly half-hours a week for Anthony, but found the network cool to 
this kind of program. 

Anthony was one of the early exponents of the "agony" show. His specialty was advis- 
ing on marital relations. 

House antitrust subcommittee chairman Emanuel Celler this week again lashed 
the present standards of tv programing, the networks, and the awe of rating 
services. The occasion: A luncheon of the Academy of Television. Arts and Sciences. 

His specific targets included imitation; fear of risk; sameness; the networks' "strangle- 
hold" on prime hours; and pushing of film programs in which the networks have a financial 
interest. 

Celler warned emphatically that pay tv is not the answer to hetter programing. 
He said the standards could even he lower — with the viewing paying for it. 

General Foods has added Mutual to its test lineup for quick-reminder radio 
copy. The order was placed through Y&R this week (30 8-second announcements a week 
for 10 weeks). 

Other network radio placements include the following via CBS: 

Standard Brands, five alternate 7 1 />-minute segments a week for 13 weeks: General 
Mills, five alternate 7 1/ |-minute segments a week for 13 weeks: Johnson & Johnson, six 
five-minute Impact units for 26 weeks: renewal of Lowell Thomas by General Motors. 

It turns out that Madison Avenue has been right all these years in calculating a 
spot announcement rating by averaging the ratings for the following and preced- 
ing shows. 

TvB said this week that it had Nielsen test this assumption via: 

• Seven different announcement schedules 

• In 100 markets. 
The answer: In no instance was the difference between the 15-minute average 

and the actual audience during the announcements greater than half a rating point. 

Spokesmen for the four radio networks delivered an impressive picture of the 
medium's status and stature before a BBDO-staged luncheon this week. 

Here's the gist of what thev told the 165 BBDO executives present: 

ABN's Bob Eastman : Our programing is designed to sell the only multi-access medi- 
um for advertising, using the entire day and night in the most economical manner. 

CBS's Frank Nesbitt: Radio can be bought advantageously weekdays and week- 
ends and stretches the advertising dollar more efficiently and effectively than any other 
medium. 

MBS's Paul Roberts: Our philosophy is that there are not big and small markets, 
but one big market — the U.S.A. — which can be sold profitably with a news formula. 



■ NBC's Joe Culligan: When we sell radio, we sell the impact and value of the 

medium as a whole on a responsible audience. 

(See 5 October sponsor for on-the-scene coverage of this event.) 

For other news coverage in this issue, see Newsmaker of the Week, page 7; 
Film-scope, page 45; Spot Buys, page 52; News and Idea Wrap-Up, page 54; Washington 
Week, page 63; sponsor Hears, page 66; and Tv and Radio Newsmakers, page 72. 

12 SPONSOR • 28 SEPTEMBER 1957 



How to have tun, 

even though you're in 
the advertising business 




JVVJL 



1. Phone home and tell your wife you're 
going to I)' 1 working ;tll evening, then 
arrive Eor dinner as usual, 




2 Believe an out-of-town elienl when he 

writes you not to meet him at the airport, 
naming airline and fiighl number. 




3. Arrange with the friend of a friend of a 
friend to gel a refrigerator wholesale, then 
return il because 11 'a the wrong color. 



, i » i . / - _ 




4. Ignore the warning outside the door of a 
photographer's darkroom. 




5. Change a 1-color page to black-and-white 
after the comp is finished. 




6. Bypass Eastern Iowa in developing a tv 
schedule for a product that requires buy- 
ing power. 



WMT-TV 

Channel 2. CBS Television for Eastern Iowa 
Mail Addi ' & f- : 7/V h ' 



SPONSOR • 



28 SEPTEMBER 195' 



13 



PROFILE OF YOUR 

tKBIG 
AUDIENCE 




i_i 



61% 30% 4i/ 2 % 4i/ 2 % 
Adult Adult Teens Children 

Women Men 

MATURE . . . 

MALE & FEMALE . . . 
COMFORTABLY WELL OFF 

THAT'S A QUICK PROFILE of the 

audience which rides the 740 spot of 
the Southern California radio dial, as 
analyzed in a new qualitative study by 
The Pulse, Inc. 

FIVE YEARS OF WOOING with 
middle-of-the-road memory music, 
interrupted only by award-winning 
five-minute newscasts and easy-going 
but brief chats by matured announc- 
ers, have won an adult, able-to-buy 
audience for KBIG. 



RENTAL GROUPS 




45% 32% 14% 9% 

$60 $50 $35 Under 

and Over to $59 to $49 $35 

Any KBIG or Weed man would like to 
show you the full picture. 




KBIG 

The Colo/mo Station 
10,000 Watts 

740 "~?r 



JOHN POOLE BROADCASTING CO. 

6S40 Sunset Blvd., Lorn Angeles 28, California 
Ttltphonm: Hollywood 3-3705 

Nat. Rep. WEED and Company 



14 



Timebuyers 
at work 




Howard Webb, The Ralph Allum Co.. New York, points out that 
"by reading the trade press and by direct network contact, buyers 
can know months in advance of show changes in prime evening hours. 
'"But you cant obtain this information in a week." Howard savs. 
"You must compile data week by week, day by day. to be accurate." 
Howard thinks that every buyer 
should prepare a network chart, 
showing time, show, show length, 
sponsor, ratings, etc. When the 
press reports a network show 
switch, he should then change his 
records and determine the deliv- 
ered audience for a comparison 
with his own buys. "Let's sa\. 
Howard says, "you have a spot 
with a 14 rating, and although 
others are available, none are 
higher. You read that Show X, 
delivering a 26, is changing times. The new period currently has an 
available spot but has a lower rating than you now have. Under the 
circumstances, it would be advantageous to order spots now in order 
to improve your ratings later." Howard adds that the best time 
to buy prime spots is usually Mid-August to Mid-September. I For 
a complete network tv schedule see Tv Basics this issue, page 37. 1 



Edward C. Dolph, Roy S. Durstine, Inc.. New York, creative ac- 
count executive, points out to timebuyers that "the good commercials 
have shape, and listening to or watching one is like looking at the 
south end of a northbound ice cream cone. Right in the middle, 
aimed straight at you, is a sharp and simple point, with everything 

else in the structure supporting it." 
Ed feels media selection, timebuy- 
ing copy and (in the case of tv) 
visual activity should all work to- 
gether to lend a definite form to 
the commercial — giving it explicit 
and unmistakable purpose. "With 
this in mind," he says, "the rules 
for building a commercial become 
simple — get your point first; find 
the very best way to put it, the 
right time to sav it and the right 
people to say it to. For me at 
least, keeping this shape in mind helps in several ways. For one. it 
often resolves seeming conflicts between copy, art and media depart- 
ments by flashing immediate warning if the shape gets distorted. If 
every creative element — and that surelv includes media — doesn't 
boost the commercial along its way. we know we've got some re- 
designing to do in order to give it the exact balance that it needs." 




SPONSOR 



28 SEPTEMBER 195' 



MERCHANDISING IS LIKE THE 
LITTLE GIRL WITH THE CURL . 



i / * 




" . . .WHEN SHE WAS GOOP 
SHE WAS VERY, VERY GOOP, 



KSTP Radio and Television believes that advertis- 
ers should receive strong, consistent and professional 
merchandising support for their advertising cam- 
paigns in the vitally important Northwest market. 

To this end, KSTP maintains a full-time mer- 
chandising staff working closely with each advertiser 
to create, develop and implement the selling aids 
which most effectively add to the success of his 
campaign. 

Among the activities which have made KSTP 
the Northwest's leader in merchandising* is the 
KSTP "Feature Foods Merchandising Plan" which 
provides special in-store displays in 200 top-volume 




ANP WHEN SHE WAS BAP 
SHE WAS HORRIP!" 



supermarkets in the Twin City area ... a KSTP 
exclusive! 

In addition. KSTP's expert merchandisers turn 
out shelf-talkers, banners, window streamers, post- 
ers, mailing pieces, survey facts and figures relating 
to your sales problem and special promotions by the 
score. There is no charge to the advertiser for 
these services which are offered at the discretion of 
the station. 

Our files are full of letters from advertisers who 
appreciate quality merchandising assistance. If you'd 
like to know more about it. contact a KSTP repre- 
sentative or your nearest Petry office. 



*February 27, 1956 issue of Broadcasting-Telecasting shous KSTP offers more merchandising scriiccs than an\ other Turn Ci/.v station 



Radio 



iTiTi 



WATTS 



Television 



1 00,000 WATTS 



MINNEAPOLIS • ST. PAUL Basic NB 

*7fo /l/tn&iwetfk- leadfoc? QtatcOK 

Represented by Edward Petry & Co., Inc. 



SPONSOR 



28 SEPTEMBER 1951 



15 



RANKS 
11th 



IN THE NATION 

in per family income 
($7,339.00) 



Source: 1957 Survey 
of Buying Power 



by Bob Foreman 



COLUMBUS 

GEORGIA 



3 county metropolitan area 

USES THE LOCAL 
& NATIONAL FAVORITE 



WRBL 




TELEVISION: 

COMPLETE DOMINANCE 
• MORNING • AFTERNOON • NIGHT 



-"" 97.3% 



RADIO: 



Area Pulse — May, 1957 

LEADS IN HOMES 

DELIVERED BY 



OF ALL 

QUARTER 

HOURS 



55% 



Day or night monthly. Best buy 
day or night, weekly or daily, is 
WRBL— NCS No. 2. 

WRBL 

AM — FM — TV 
COLUMBUS, GEORGIA 



CALL HCLLINGBFRY CO. 



16 



Agency ad libs 




God and Sam are our co-pilots 

Several weeks ago the New York Times saw 
fit to print some comments in its tv pages, on 
the suhject of the pilot film. This topic is one of 
my favorites and since it has such a bearing on 
the lives of all of us who labor in television 
whether we are in the producing end of the busi- 
ness or not, I shall expend a modicum of thought 
and a maximum of language on it. 

Mr. Godbout, who wrote the piece from Hollywood, mecca of the 
True-Blue Pilot Film, does a fine job of outlining the hazard to 
producer of producing the "one-shot sample of what we mean" film. 
Costs are between $35,000 and $65,000, the number unsold at the 
end of any season is about 130; hence around $6,000,000 cash is 
annually going down the drain, not to mention the hours of effort on 
the part of writers, players, directors and technicians of all sorts. 

However, I must take issue with Mr. Godbout's statement that the 
advertising agencies "contend a sponsor, untrained in entertainment 
values, cannot visualize a series from a written presentation or even 
a complete set of scenarios. He requires something visually tangi- 
ble." I don't think it's quite fair to strap any such onus to the al- 
ready scarred back of a sponsor. It is possible that the agency it- 
self wants a little more explicit example of what a producer describes 
over the lunch table. By so doing, it doesn t necessarily mean the 
agency (or sponsor) is comprised of dolts who have the same ability 
to read a script as a seven-year-old. 

It's a comforting safeguard 

In fact, if Elia Kazan himself were representing the agency and 
I was Mr. Big for the prospective sponsor-company, in most in- 
stances I would still prefer a pilot film before I permitted my agency 
to commit me to $2.5 million (time as well as talent I for 26 alter- 
nate weeks of the epic under discussion. 

And presumptuous as it may be of me to talk for Mr. Kazan. I 
daresay if he were an agency man I imagine this! ), he might feel 
similarly. A pilot is a mighty comforting companion to have along 
on the rough road ahead and though I sympathize with the folks 
who must produce them and I fully understand the risks, the haz- 
ards and the un-economy, but to the biggest gambler of all — Mr. 
Sponsor — it's a safeguard that's mighty comforting. 

Let us suppose that the two of us. vou and I, represent agency and 
advertiser, and we are faced, over lunch, by a third party whom we 
know r only casually and via his considerable reputation in the trade. 
This gentleman is talking up a storm about a show concept he wants 
to produce in series (39 steps) and sell us for telecasting in the 
prime-time spot where our present vehicle is languishing. 

Now our friend states that his writer has been top boy on The 
Mad Embalm er and before that on Heaven Help I s, two of the more 
successful tv items of the past few seasons. His director is just fin- 
ishing up The Web and The Revolver, a western that is so adult they 



SPONSOR 



28 SEPTEMBER 1957 



even get letters I octogenarians. I In- wardrobe designei in- 

vented f "h«- Swivel Bra and the gu) t hi • \ selected hn the lead i- sure 
to l>< - more popular than Deai \mi.i/ and James Vrnesa pul togethei 
(which combination he resembles ! I. 

Y.u I know .mil so do j ou thai the part) <>f tin' third part is a 
hep guy. However, we have learned thai In- i- also a good salesman 
and that, in this business, anyone can he overenthusiastic. s " we 
-a\ something like this to him : 

"Sam, we, too, like your concept. Vlmosl as much a- you in Fat t. 
The scrip! we read, following the words carefully with our index 
finger, reads great. The stills of Vrnaz-Arness h">k terrific. \ n< I il 
you've gol thai \\ i iii-r and this wardrobe designer and a big sound- 
stage over on the Grovenj Lol right next to where the) are shooting 
the sequel t" "The Ten Commandments" bo you can borrow theii 
sets during lunch, shucks, we think you've got ii made. 

\\ ill film capture the idea? 

"But we three ran be wrong. \t least (>(>-,(' « ol u- ran. \n.l 
although you risk about 50 G's in your pilot (half of which can be 
deferred), we have to risk two million si\ on tins l>al>\ in time and 
talent and commercial dough plus whatever millions can be bookkepl 
against the venture's advertising value to our company. Sooo — Sam. 
we're going to ask to see that pilot first. And as the) sa\ in the life 
insurance ads. here's precisely wh) : 

"Seeing is believing —as well as relieving. Can all the element- 
on paper and on the credits work together? \\ ill the finished prod- 
uct live up to the script which requires superior easting, direc- 
tion, production? So much is left unsaid in the greatest script, so 
much can he mangled in the doing, can all the bright -tar- you've 

got under contract he assembled into an orderly galaxy? Can you, 
if you'll pardon us. actualh finance the first show? We've run into 
millionaire- in \our business who never seem to have enough cash 
handy to pay for a couple of opticals and this causes real trouble 
along the wa\ in a 'W-episode serie-." 

Well, it was a nice lunch and Sam saw the point so he's going to 
shoot a pilot next week. We're pretty excited. We have to wait an 
extra week because he won't let us see the rough cut. We don't have 
enough sense i he implied i to judge what the finished film will look 
like from the makeshift of a rough cut (though he first tried to sell 
us the whole series from a script and a martini). Anyhow we're 
all pretty hot for it. In fact. Sam talked our good client out of five 
G's toward the pilot for a LO-da) turnaround once it's out ol the lab. 
The money is recoverahle if we don't buy and Sam then sells else- 
where. So. as I said, we're hoping it's for us and at this stage, God 
and Sam are our co-pilots. ^ 

Letters to Bob Foreman are welcome 
Do you always agree with what Bob Foreman says in Agency 
ad libs? Both Bob and the editors of sponsor will be happy 

to receive and print your comments. Address them to Bob 
Foreman, c o sponsor. 40 F. VUh. Veie York 17. Yew York 



28 SEPTEMBER 195' 



SPONSOR 




(ion across the board in both 
Pulse and Hooper! July-Auq. 
Pulse: weekdays 15.3. Sat. 
16.7 Sun. 17.3 — averages 6 
a . m . - m i d n i g h t . June-July 
Hooper, weekdays. 7 a.m. to 
noon 22.0. noon-6 p.m. 24.0, 
all day average. Nielsen 
agrees with a 22,520 rating 6 
a.m. to 9 p.m. KOBY operates 
full time . . . 10.000 watts 
blanket the tntire bay area. 
Definitely the No. I buy be- 
cause it's San Francisco's most 
listened-to station. See your 
Petry man, today! 




K0SI 




Denver's 
top- rated station all day — all 
weekend! June-July Hooper: 
18.9 a.m., 24.6 p.m. share. 
June Pulse rates KOSI No. I 
independent, 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. 
with a 16.8 average. All sur- 
veys prove KOSI's domin«nce 
5 000 watts— sells full 
time. Represented by Forjoe. 




WGVM 

in Greenville. Miss. 

No. 1 in both Hooper 
& Nielsen 

S«c : Dcvney &■ Co 
Inc 

MID-AMERICA 

BROADCASTING 

COMPANY 



17 



It's 
great 
at night, 
too! 



Huge audiences are no 
sometime thing with us. 
Each weekday evening from 
6 to midnight, KNX reaches 
43% of the people who listen 
to us over the entire 24 hour 
period! For a bunch of other 
intriguing facts on our big, 
big nighttime audiences 
and our low, low nightime 
costs, contact CBS Spot Sales 
or Southern California's 
#1 radio station. 

KNX* LOS ANGELES 




News and views for women in 
advertising and wives of admen 



Women's week 



REPRESENTED BY CBS RADIO SPOT SALES 



What kind of husband is a president? An American Manage- 
ment Association survey of 335 member company presidents head- 
ing companies with average sales of $65 million in 1955 sketches 
an intriguing family portrait of "the company president": 

Most company presidents are family men. Of the 335 surveyed, 
only five are bachelors; 304 are married; 23, divorced, three, 
widowers. The average number of children among the men sur- 
vey ed is two, but the presidents under 40 years of age average three. 

Their favorite sport, by a wide margin, is golf, although their 
vacations tend to center around the family. While the top execu- 
tive's long working hours have become a traditional cliche of busi- 
ness publications, the overwhelming majority of company presidents 
tear themselves away from the office for at least two to four weeks 
of vacation a year. They also claim to spend 20-to-40 hours a week 
with their families, and to devote time to community organizations. 

Insurance for professional women: Married women have most 
always relied on their husbands for family insurance. Most work- 
ing women considered their responsibility a temporary status until 
marriage. But today an increasing number of women, married and 
unmarried, have become good insurance prospects. 

The reason: As women have grown in job stature, their salary 
has become increasingly important to their family's standard of 
living. It is no longer "just pocket money." 

The type of coverage most sought is health insurance. Annual 
premiums for basic medical insurance policies to cover up to $7,500 
in "in-and-out-of-hospital" expenses range as follows, according 
to age: 

Age 25— $40.33; age 30— $43.82; age 35— $47.77; age 40— 
$52.31: age 45— $57.74. 

Tv brings New York styles to the country: From the very first 
network shows, an effect of tv has been to speed up the spread of 
fashions throughout the country. ( Far more than movies, with a 
one-vear gap between production and release, possibly could.) 

This fall, a closed-circuit telecast in 30 cities aimed at beauti- 
cians throughout the countrv. will take this equalizing process into 
ladies' hair stvles. As Joan Sinclair, co-producer of this 3 November 
"Beautyrama" show says: 

"Todav. through tv, the woman in Kansas City. Buffalo or Mem- 
phis can have the benefit of the same top expert stylists in all areas 
of fashion as the woman who lives in America's fashion center. 
New York." 

Employee benefits: Agency wives have an increasingly difficult 
job in evaluating their husbands' earnings or trying to advise on a 
job change. The big reason for the difficulty — the many employee 
benefits and incentive plans that agencies offer today to attract top 
talent and to keep down the personnel turnover. 



18 



SPONSOR 



28 SEPTEMBER 1957 




SPONSOR • 28 SEPTEMBER l ( ).i7 



19 




A housewife, that is. In Indianapolis, you'll find her 
listening to WISH Radio! WISH knows that the house- 
wife is the one who does the buying for the family. 
That's why WISH directs its programming to her — 
gives her the things she wants to hear. Lively musical 
shows . . . fine CBS daytime dramas . . . presentations keyed 
to an adult buying audience. And that's why advertisers 
find WISH their best buy in the rich Indianapolis market! 
Represented by Boiling. 




A CORINTHIAN STATION Responsibility in Broadcasting 

KOTV Tulsa • KGUL-TV Galveston, semng Houston • WANE & WANE-TV Fott Wayne . WISH Ic WISH-TV Indianapolis 



49th and 
Madison 



Network affiliation 

You will forgive me, I hope, for com- 
menting that at times trade press re- 
porting is so sloppy that it borders on 
the ridiculous. 

That bothers me in your case be- 
cause SPONSOR is so damned good, 
most times, that it enjoys the great 
advertiser-agency acceptance it has 
earned. 

But I'm thinking about Csida's in- 
credibly ridiculous column about 
Plough's "copyrighted formula." To 
describe conventionally good, long es- 
tablished techniques as a modern mir- 
acle is to sell the whole institution of 
radio down the river! 

I'm concerned somewhat more seri- 
ously, about your 7 September "Ra- 
dio in Transition." 

Doesn't sponsor know that a good 
many stations retain their network 
affiliation because they want it and that 
they want it for very important pro- 
graming reasons (surely, there could 
be no other reason these days) ? 

Don't you know of network stations 
that have a definite thought-out pro- 
gram format to attract audiences to 
the network fare that follows and hold 
audiences inherited from the network 
fare that preceded, and never play 
"top 40" just because it is "top 40," 
but instead select music in station time 
to reach the mood and age group, that 
have been tuned to a Godfrey, a soap 
opera, etc. and coordinate with the 
very best news coverage there is — 
world-wide network coverage — local 
and regional news, performed with 
equal skill, and work on the theory 
that news-and-music stations or coun- 
try music stations or race stations are 
all things to some people but these 
network affiliates can be all things to 
all people much of the time and by 
doing all of these things well, by mak- 
ing themselves an integral part of all 
the community, attract vastly greater 
audiences. 

I know it because, operating in a 
four-station market — where New York 
and Philadelphia can be heard, this 
network affiliate has only 2^ less audi- 
ence, sign-on to sign-off. than all of 
our competitors combined. 

If it works in this tough market, you 



20 






SPONSOR 



28 SEPTEMBER 1957 



PRIMARY 
MARKET 



400,000 people in the 
Ann Arbor area respond 
primarily to local radio. 
It's a huge market AND 
NOT ADEQUATELY 
COVERED BY OUTSIDE 
STATIONS. 



ANN ARROR 

AREA 

Includes Plymouth, 
Ypsilanti, Livonia and 
23 important industrial 
communities in Michigan. 

FIRSTinPULSE 

Most recent Pulse 
indicates WHRV's strong 
superiority... 18 firsts 
(half hours) out of 24. 

WHRV 

1,000 watts abc 1600 kc 

Major league baseball, 
University of Mich, sports 
Detroit Red Wing Hockey 

6:00-9:00 A.M. Joe and Ralph, 
famous in Mich, area 



u 



Write for special merchandising 
plan or contact: 

BOB DORE ASSOCIATES 

National Representatives 

the door is ahraya open . . . 



Bob Dore Assoc. 420 Madison Ave., N. Y. 17, N. Y. 

* JUKI ■• PULII 



can l>rt yOUI bottOIM <lnll.il that it i- 

working in a hundred othei markets 
You do the industry nog I l>\ imply- 
ing — even il ii is simpl) bj omission 
thai all nl radio s future is in news- 
aii(l-mu-i< operations. Wed be in sad 
shape without network and the "we" 
means "W e, the People of." 

Jin \ Sill, president 
It I /'(,. itlantic < in 

■That's a wonderful article in your cur- 
rent issue . . . "i isic-and-news op- 
erations. It's a thoughtful and search- 
ing approach t<> a Bubject too man) 
interests have tried to dispose of with 
snide, Bnappj slogans . . . or too- 
iogical logic. 

Hans \l. London 

Henry .1 . Kaufman ci /^<» Kites 
11 ushinu.ton. I). C. 

That routing list 

Please add mj name and address i" 
your li>i of persona] subscribers for 

SPONSOR Magazine at \olir nns sub- 
scription rate <if $3.00 per annum. 

\\ ill j nil please include a cop} « » f the 
latest T\ Radio Basics Magazine. 

I have long been on the office route 
list for sponsor, ami I believe it to be 
the finest "trade journal" available to 
time lmvers. 

I am sure that you are making a 
good move with this "price adjust- 
ment. 

Sam Glickman, timebuyer 
Quality Bakers of America 
Cooperative. Veu York 

All-Media Evaluation Study 
\ couple of years ami Bill \ndrews of 
k\B(! delivered an address before the 
Oakland Advertising Club, subject: ra- 
dio advertising for the realtor. 

He quoted several examples from 
the radio basic section on "Media 
Evaluation Study, 1954" issue 1>\ you. 

Quotation is proper for an address, 
hut max I now have \(>ur permission 
to use these figures from his speech in 
a book for real estate advertising in 
preparation for Prentire-Hall Inc. 

I am doing a chapter on Badio Ad- 
vertising for Realtors, and I need some 
success stories such a- quoted 1>\ Bill 
— specificalh a tract in \therton. Cali- 
fornia, at Little Rock, \rkan-us. and 
a third which escapes me ' m\ notes 
are not at hand at this writing. I 

Morton J. \. McDonald 
Oakland Tribune, 

Oakland 

• l'<Tttti..i')n crantrd. 




NBC AFFILIATE 





PADUCAH, KENTUCKY 



570 KILOCYCLES 

SERVING 

5 
STATES 

WEST 

KENTUCKY'S 
MOST 
POWERFUL 
STATION 



Represented /<v the 
JOHN t. PEARSON CO. 



SPONSOR 



28 SEPTEMBER 195"! 



21 




BACKUS: 




bright, brash, bouncy 




The Jim Backus Show goes live on American Radio, 
weekdays, 2-3 pm, starting Monday, October 7 

Jim Backus gives a fun-in-the-afternoon mood to American's all-new. all-live musical line-up. 

Backus, a well-known man-ot-many-voices (Mr. Magoo. Hubert Updyke III. to name a 
couple), adds to his already bright entertainment career a new. live network hour of currently 
popular music and spontaneous humor. The Jim Backus Show features songstress Betty Johnson 
(live), whose I Dreamed has sold close to a million copies, baritone Jack Haskell (live), The 
Honeydreamers (live), Elliot Lawrence's orchestra (live) and top announcer Del Sharbutt (live). 

This is the kind of radio— strong on music, long on fun— that today"s young, on-the-go 
housewife wants. This is live American Radio. 



thejfc 



one is 
/ 




AMERICAN 

BROADCASTING 

NETWORK 



This week: 

FIRST 

ANNIVERSARY 

ASA 

STORZ STATION 

FINDS WQAM'S 

RUNAWAY 

COMPLETE! 



Hooper's greeting: 42.1% all day average, 7 a.m. -6 p.m., Monday 
through Saturday. 

And from Pulse — 2 happy birthday cards: 

Metro Pulse gives WQAM derisive first place 

So does a brand new Southern Florida area Pulse, that accounts 

for the listening preferences of 31.5% of the people of Florida. 

-Many happy returns from Trendex, too, with a strong first for 
WQAM. 

And many thanks to you who buy time — for your quick recognition 
of the change in Miami radio listening . . . and for your confidence 
in the personalities and programmings of the new .... 



WQAM 



Serving all of southern Florida with 5,000 watts on 560 kc 
and Radio #1 in . . . 

MIAMI 










• "-» ftr- ."■ 



* ,~. 






&k ' 



-J ' 




TODAY'S RADIO FOR TODAY'S SELLING 



WD6Y Minneapolis St. Paul 
WHB Kansas City 
WQAM Miami 

REPRESENTED BY JOHN BLAIR & CO. 



TODD STORZ, PRESIDENT 



WTIX New Orleans 

REPRESENTED BY ADAM YOUNG INC. 



- 1 



SPONSOR • 28 SEPTEMBER 1957 



^SPON SO R 

28 SEPTEMBER 1037 




THE MARKETING VEEP 

A growing power in more and more t> clienl organi- 
zations, he's not a mediaman, yel shapes ad and media 

policy both. Here's how he >\ork-«. whal he dot-. 



^\ new figure lias been appearing at the head "I 
more and more clienl conference tables whenevei 
major advertising decisions are to be made: the 
marketing v.p. 

^gencymen, media executives, station representa- 
tives have all become increasingl) aware ol his power. 

• He's the man who holds the purse ~t i i hl:~. gives 
the word on the amount of monej the company and 
each brand in the product lineup can spend foi its 
over-all selling effort. 

• He has to approve a major expenditure, like a 
network tv buy, and has the right to veto it even 



against tli<- recommendations ol both the 
the admen within his own organization. 

• He sits in "ii ei er) majoi ag< - ition 

and. in the last analysis, has the decisive voice even 
in the choice "I a new advertising agency. 

In short, he is todaj th<' - i r i _: I . ■ most important ad- 
vertising policy-shaper in man) major client orj 
tions. 

\\ In li.i~ -" much power been given to this executive 
in -<i main companies? 

What- his background and how does he functi 

How direct is his influence on major advertising de- 



SPONSOR 



28 SEPTEMBER 1951 



25 






The marketing veep holds the purse strings, 
must okay all major national media decisions like 
network tv buys, and is key in choice of agency 



cisions, including the selection of air 
media? 

Those are questions all executives 
concerned with the preparation, buying 
and selling of advertising confront 
today. 

In the past few months, these are 
among major tv advertisers who have 
reorganized their ad management un- 
der marketing v.p.'s: Philip Morris 
appointed George Weissman; Chrysler 
Corp., James Cope; P. Lorillard, 
Emanuel Yellen; Shaeffer Pen Co., 
Edmund F. Buryan. 

Other firms, like Campbell Soup and 
Nabisco, have been operating their ad- 
vertising planning under a marketing 
v.p. for a year or more. 

It's likely that more companies, large 
and small, will appoint marketing v.p.'s 
this year. The reasons: the complex- 
ities of our economy and the increasing 
complexity of advertising, particularly 
television. 

"It's difficult in today's complex 
business situation to know where sell- 
ing and advertising leave off," says 
Nabisco marketing v.p. Lee Bickmore. 
"And it is more important than ever to 
have these efforts correlated and work- 
ing hand-in-hand." 

The solution in many major com- 
panies today is to have advertising and 
sales executives working side by side 
and reporting to a marketing v.p. His 
objective: a well-meshed and harmoni- 
ous joint effort. 

Originally the top advertising execu- 
tive in most companies used to report 
to the top sales executive, since adver- 
tising was considered simply an aid 
to selling. Then as advertising grew 
in stature (and budget), particularly 
through the effectiveness and costliness 
of television, advertising came to rank 
more and more on a level with sales. 
A new phenomenon arose: The top 
advertising executive, like the key sales 
executive in a firm, reported to the 
president or executive v.p. of the com- 
pany in a direct line of responsibility. 

"But it's difficult for the executive 
v.p. of a major company to be inti- 
mately concerned with the marketing 
of his products," as Ross R. Millhiser. 
assistant director of marketing at 



Philip Morris, explains it. "After all. 
he also carries the top responsibility 
for all company finance, for construc- 
tion, expansion, supervision of sub- 
sidiaries and so forth. Therefore, many 
companies have found the need to in- 
stall a key executive at an intermediary 
level to coordinate all the marketing 
functions." 

The pattern: Major multi-brand 
package goods firms tend to organize 
the various departments under the mar- 
keting v.p. along similar lines. 

For instance, Nabisco, Campbell 
Soup and Philip Morris all have cor- 
porate advertising directors: Harry 
Schroeter, Rex Budd and Roger Greene, 
respectively. These men function on 
a policy level as media coordinators 
between the various brands or divi- 
sions. But one of their most important 
functions is to negotiate and buy net- 
work television programing and help 
apportion it among the various brand 
groups that may be interested in such 
a vehicle. 

These advertising directors or v.p.'s 
report to the marketing v.p. in the same 
way that the sales vice president does. 
But advertising strategy and media 
breakdowns for the individual brands 
come not from them, but from the 
brand groups of divisions. 

When a Philip Morris agency makes 
a presentation of new plans, it has been 
worked out with the particular brand 
group involved. Roger Greene ha* 
probably been consulted throughout, 
but the primary responsibilitv for the 
planning lies with the brand group. 

Here's how he functions as media 
coordinator: 

Suppose Spud cigarettes decide to 
cancel some commercial schedules in 
a particular market. The brand ad 
manager first checks with Roger 
Greene, who sees whether another PM 
brand might want these schedules, be- 
fore Spud cancels them. 

George Weissman, as the Philip 
Morris marketing v.p., is responsible 
for the entire company's advertising. 
But he does not get into the actual 
operation or execution of ad plans. 



The chiei marketing executive re- 
ports to the executive v.p. and is ac- 
countable to him for developing, plan- 
ning, directing and coordinating all 
long and short-term marketing policies 
and programs. Therefore, the market- 
ing v.p. is not likely to see any media 
representative, since he does not usual- 
ly personally shape media strategy. 
On the other hand, network tv de- 
cisions, which used to need the ap- 
proval of the company president (and 
as a formality, still do in some in- 
stances I frequent!) do involve the mar- 
keting v.p. 

For instance, John McGlinn, Camp- 
bell Soup Co. marketing v.p., does get 
into negotiations with top network 
brass when a new buy, or an extension 
of the station lineup might be in the 
offing. (For an analysis of Campbell's 
ad management, see "Campbell's New 
advertising team two years later," 1 
June 1957 issue of sponsor.) 



The new Philip Morris: 
this is the trend for 
most big tv advertisers 




George Weissman, Philip Morris mar- 
keting v.p. (above) is responsible for all 
sales, advertising, marketing programs 
shaped by such top executives reporting to 
him as (1. to r.) Roger Greene, advertising 
\.1>.: Ray Jones, sales v.p.; conferring about 
net t\ with Marlboro brand mgr. T. S. 
Christensen, as-'t. mkt. dir. R. R. Millhiser 



26 



SPONSOR 



28 SEPTEMBER 1957 



Annual plan-: Most marketing v.p.'s 
of companies work in a similai pattei n 
with theii sales and advertising depart 
ments and agencies In formulating the 
advertising strateg] for the dexl year. 
••\\ e have a strategy meeting dui ing 
the lasl «<-ek in March oi the firsl 
week in \|'iil to sel advertising polic) 
for the next year," says Nabisco's I ee 
Bickmore. "' fbis meeting includes our 
directors oi marketing, sales and ad- 
vertising and kcs people from the 

a-ene\ ." 

I he company president or executive 
\.|>. ma) -it in on parts oi these meet" 
ings, l>ui Bickmore presides through- 
out. Each company division, Buch as 
biscuits or Bpecial products, is con- 
sidered separately in an all-day meet- 
ing. 

\i (Ids time the group analyzes the 
di\ision"s sales and acKerti-ini: lii-l.m 
for the past five years, whal its Btatus 
is at the present and what the future 



short- and Ion objectives n 

be. The discussions are based on r< 
ports by the dh ision'a key people on 
share oi market foi the produi \t sales 
and profit profiles. 

•• linn hc look at "in future in terms 

oi the i lu< t- areas and media i on 

reined.'" says Bickmore, "By the time 
oi tlii- get-together, oui agent it - I 
worked closely w iili the men in oui di- 
visions in preparing theii recommen- 
dations. Dui ing the meetings, we real- 
ty refine and altei these recommends 
lions, rather than lay down basic 
plans.' 1 

In other words, the kes agency and 
company division executives have al- 
ready worked out the media and copy 
strategy on the basis oi an estimated 
budget for the nexl year. They use 
the strategy meeting i" review their 
plans for using net w oik 01 spot t\. 
programing or announcements. ' lhanges 
can -till be made at this point, and 



often are, thi ough group di» u 

I in, in • the nexl few months, the 
plans foi the nexl 
furthei and developed. Mien in Vu 
list, Bickmore < alls a meeting oi th 

division managers t form them 

.die. ut the advertising plans. \t these 
meetings, these men have a • ham 
openly make theii "^ n r« ommend i 
tions. 

"One might say foi instance that 
pi mi doesn't give us the i overage we 
need in .1 certain group oi markets and 
that we should have radio announi e- 
ments "i t\ programing on a spot I 
instead t" avoid a sales slump," 
I'ik kmore. *' I hen, when the <\n ision 
managers have approved the over-all 
plan-, they 're a part oi it." 

Uier these meetings and the result- 
ing refinements in the advertising 
strategy . the plan- are brought 1 losei 
to being final, fn December, Nabi» 
I Please turn to pagi 67) 









RADIO IN TRANSITION 

Part of a continuing series 

THE 

SATURATION 
MEDIUM 








Most admen feel spot radio will never return 
to the days of the five announcements per- 
week campaign. Today's client uses 20 to 
200 spots per week per station, in order to 
reach 75% of the radio homes in a market 



■ ^robably no other concept has con- 
tributed so much to the new radio as 
has saturation advertising. In less than 
five years, this idea of buying all the 
repetition one can afford helped turn 
an all-but-stalled advertising vehicle 
into the fast-rolling bandwagon that 
is spot radio today. 

This week, sponsor took a long look 
at saturation radio — its past, present 
and future. In speaking to both buyers 
and sellers, there was virtually general 
agreement on these points: 

• More clients are buying satura- 
tion radio than ever before. 

• As these buys increase, stations 
find themselves with less time to sell, 
and thus saturation campaigns — par- 
ticularly in traffic hours — are becom- 
ing more difficult to buy. 

• This situation is forcing more 
announcements into other times of the 
day. Weekends are becoming more ac- 
ceptable to saturation clients. The next 






im-\ itable breakthrough m ill I"' nighl 
time. 

• Saturation will continue i" be the 
most widely-used Btrateg) in spot radio 
because of the proven accumulation of 
audience b) thai medium. 

• Saturation, mam feel, is turning 
radio business from a buyei - to a 
sellers market. 

• Saturation is mam things to 

mam clients. 

It would be hard to find another 
single word in broadcast advertising 
that is subject to as mam differenl in- 
terpretations as ••saturation. lo add 
to the semantic complexities the word 
has been qualified b) such adjectives 

as "moderate."" "average and 

"super." 

I nder this mantle of confusion buy- 
ers and Bellers have set up yardsticks 

and worked out formulae in the name 

of saturation. \t P&G agent :ies, buy- 
ers have bought saturation without 

mentioning the word. \t Colgate, two 

years ago, saturation was dissected 
like a frog and a use-formula arrived 
;t: 10 rating points to reach 2!!' - ol 
the homes in a market. 1 10 rating 

points to reach 50^5 (, f radio homes. 
and 100 points to cover 75$ of the 
homes. 

\t the same time a lol of timebuyers 
and agenc) research departments ar- 



med at the conclusion thai about l'»t 
announcements per week in a majoi 

market would reach hall the radio 

hoine~ and thus "saturate. 
>inee then countless Blide-rules wt re 

slipped and Coverage map- | •• ■ r • • 1 ovei 

and new formulae evolved. Yet, to- 
day, h hen buj ci - are quei ied i in sat- 
iiiation. the -lock answer comes up 

" \\ ell. it all depends on what \ OU 

mean 1>\ saturation . . . 

in (.race Porterfield, of Benton and 
Howies, uho pioneered the saturation 

concept loi Maxwell I (ouse ' offee, tin- 
ideal saturation campaign would be 
"7.V , share of audience with one -pot 
ever) 1 5 minutes around the I lot k. 
"In order to do the maximum job 

with radio," she su-. "one -houhl 
I'm from sign-on to sign-ofl and 
should seriousl) considei all-nighl 

radio. 

For a major market such as New 

i oik or I. os \n_M-lc-. I out I lollings- 
head of McCann-Erickson feels that 
saturation can he achieved b) 30 to 
"iii spots on a minimum of two top sta- 
tions. "Three stations."" he adds 
"would be better. 

To launch Oasis Cigarettes Liggett 
vV Meyers is in the middle ol a cam- 
paign that embraces 50 spot- a week 
per station. Firestone I ire \ Rubber 
has just run two campaigns on 115 



stations in 8 > top mai Icets m ith m bed- 
ules of approximatel) >" am 

Mi- III- OBI h pel week. In < oi,li a-l to 

these ■ oni epts of satui at ion, R J 
Reynolds Co. i- promoting • ivaliei 

1 i rettes in - e 200 markets foi I -' 

week- with an average frequenc) of 
onlj eight spot- a week. 

Probabl) the biggest saturation 
i ampaign of all time in radio is run- 
lit now. I'hi- i- the ordei 
plai ed bj Sin< Ian Refining I 
through it- N'-w ioik agency, Morey, 
lliimm & Warwick, that is saturating 
150 markets in 36 -t ites foi a 52-week 
■ ampaign at a cost of II 5 million. 
I he frequency is upwards of 200 an- 
nouncements p'l Week, which Work- 
out to a total of |n. (inn announcements 
iveekl) on 'miu radio -tat ions "\\ e're 
Inn ing reniemluani e, saj - fames I 
I >' I me \ . Sin< I iii - a>K ■ - 1 1 1 - i 1 1 ■_■ man- 
ager, and that - pi-t v. hat they're buy- 
ing since the announcements an- all 
"shorties of five-set onds dural ion. 

< tne thing i- i ertain at the moment. 
I here w ill never he a ma-- retui n lo 
the old radio advertising i oncepl of 
five announcements pei week. ~>2 weeks 
a \ ear. I he new radio, and what ad- 
vertisers have found out about it. has 
tolled the knell on low frequenc) • 
paigns. 



% 
50 
40 
30 
20 
10 












































A 




























j^^ m ^ 


^„.*.- 


-^ 




































/ j 

if 

























1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


d a 


9 


H 


10 announcements 



The point of diminishing returns can set in on a sat urati- >n cam- 
paign according to chart by Adam Young Inc. based on Nielsen sur- 
\ey of New York. Chicago and Los Angeles. The schedules examined 
were 10. 20. 30. 40. SO and 100 announcements per week. Line A repre- 



sents schedules on 2 stations, indicates bj contrast that when over 
40 announcements 3 week arc used cm onrj one station, impact tap- r- 
off. Dotted line B represents the use of only one station, the top one 

in the market. \ ertical column at left is percent of homes reached 



sponso: 



lEFTEMDF.a '. 'Ol 



29 



SATURATION 



i uritinued 



'How the stations rolled out the red 
carpets," recalls Lynn Diamond of 
I. mil Mogul, "wlit'ii I started buying 
20 or more spots a week for Rayco 
Seat Covers five years ago. At that 
time, the average client was buying 
three or five spots, and the saturation 
plan \\a> in its infancy. 

"Today," she continues, "it has be- 
come something of a trick to find 
traffic availabilities, because this is the 
time a lot of clients want to saturate." 
For Rayco, however, this presents no 
big problem. They want no more than 
10 announcements out of their 20 to 
35 weekly in traffic hours. "We want 
to reach an audience at other times," 
Lynn explains. 

"In another several weeks," says 
George Dietrich, sales manager for 



NBC Spot Radio, "any saturation cam- 
paign must consist of 309? minimum 
at night. Daytime is selling out fast." 
This may be all to the good for the 
advertiser. True saturation, he points 
out, is an accumulation of impressions 
throughout the broadcast day. 

"Saturation is the only way to buv 
radio economically," says Dick Pickett 
of Foote, Cone & Belding. "The uni- 
verse of radio is limited to begin with 
and if you start restricting your cam- 
paign to only certain hours in a day, 
then you set up additional limits to 
your reach." Almost all buyers and 
sellers are unanimous in this feeling 
that saturation must touch all segments 
of the day. 

Buyers and sellers are unanimous, 
too, in their feeling that the frequency 



of announcements in a saturation cam- 
paign depends on the product prob- 
lems and the campaign objectives. It 
also depends on the client budget and 
the sales expectancy. 

Although the term "super-satura- 
tion" has been bandied about a good 
deal (with no one quite certain what 
"super" is), there is a growing feeling 
among some in the industry that be- 
yond a given number of announce- 
ments per week per station there is a 
point of diminishing returns. 

Adam Young Inc. has made just 
such a study, and on its findings have 
based its rate card which stops at 36 
announcements per week. This rep 
firm's research found that when over 
40 announcements a week are used for 
{Please turn to page 47) 



Here's what it costs to buy saturation spot radio in 1957 



General Saturation 



Metropolitan Markets In 
Descending Order By 
Population Size Rank"' 



12 

iouncem< 
Weekly 



First 5 $ 2,500 

" 10 3,800 

" 15 5,100 

" 20 6,400 

" 25 7,300 

" 30 8,750 

" 35 9,500 

" 40 10,350 

" 45 11,200 

" 50 11,700 

" 55 12,500 

" 60 13,400 

" 65 14,400 

" 70 15,100 

M 75 15,500 

M 80 15,950 

M 85 16,450 

" 90 17,150 

" 95 17,700 

*' 100 18,250 

Chart utesy of Joiin Blair Cc. 



24 


48 


?6 


Premium 


Announcements 


Announcements 


Announcements 


Time 


Weekly 


Weekly 


Weekly 


12-Plan 


$ 4,500 


$ 8,800 


$ 17,250 


$ 3,100 


6,950 


13,450 


26,400 


4,850 


9,400 


18,000 


35,250 


6,500 


11,750 


22,400 


44,000 


8,200 


13,450 


25,200 


49,450 


9,400 


16,000 


30,050 
32,450 


58,900 
63,750 


11,100 


17,300 


12,050 


18,900 


35,450 


69,600 


13,150 


20,400 


38,250 


75,200 


14,250 


21,300 


40,000 


78,700 


14,850 


22,850 


42,950 


84,100 


15,900 


24,450 


46,050 


90,300 


17,050 


26,300 


49,600 


97,350 


18,150 


27,500 


51,900 


101,950 


18,900 


28,250 


53,450 


105,000 


19,400 


29,100 


55,050 


107,550 


20,000 


29,900 


56,450 


110,250 


20,550 


31,150 


58,950 


115,150 


21,300 


32,100 


60,750 


118,700 


21,850 


33,000 


62,500 


122,150 


22,750 



30 



SPONSOR • 28 SEPTEMBER 1957 



SHOULD YOU DROP 



A SUCCESSFUL JINGLE? 



This was problem faced hy 
Burgermeister beer. Much 
of it> heavy air expenditure 
had been associated with 
long-running jingle. 
But new marketing ap- 
proach dictated change. Re- 



sulting sales hit new highs 




New Jingle caught on fast, -link shows. Comparing figures f'T old jingle with n>-.. 

(1. to r.) : Burgermeister's I •■- Mullins; IUil)<>'- Jim Hunk Loo R<>ll<- and M idler 



W 



hen do you drop a successful 
jingle? 

Is it good business to Bwitch to a 
completely new advertising approach 
if sale- indicate the old one is still 
pulling? 

fhese are problems facing every 
heavy user of air media. Last year 
Burgermeister Beer came up with 
what has proved the right combination 
of answers for them. 

Burgermeister Beer is number two 
in the western beer market and the 
major part of its ad budget, which 
SPONSOR estimate- i- over two million 
dollar-, goes into air media. 

Les Mullins, Burgermeister advertis- 
ing manager, and Lou Rolle. BBDO, 
San Francisco, group supervisor for 
the account, decided to revise their ap- 
proach — which had been \er\ conserv- 
ative — and appeal to women as well as 
men. 



SPONSOR • 28 SEPTEMBER 1957 



"To give our switch impact in the 
competitive western beer market, 
Rolle told sponsor, "we decided to add 
-pot saturation- in radio and tv to oui 
basic 52-week -pot schedules supple- 
mented bj syndicated -how- and some 
participation-. Our starting point was 
a new slogan and a new jingle. Both 
had to be good." 

"^ ou see," Mullins explained, "theii 
predecessors had served Burgie well 
for lit years. I he old jingle was the 

tii-t ev er used l"l a beer and I >■■ 

the best-known jingle in Northern 
California. \- Burgie expanded, the 
jingle became popular in other western 

market-. 

"Bui any jingle reaches the wear- 

out point, the place where people no 
longer reallv hear it. That wa- what 
wa- happening !■> out I lementine, ' 

Introduced on radio in 1946, two 
\ear- after the eompanv -tailed using 



advertising for the first time, the jingle 
wa- carolled i" the tune of \L Dar- 
lin' ( lementine . 

Burgermeister, Burgerrm 
/'"- ... light mill gokh 
Burgermeister, Burgermeist* 
It ■. a truly fine pale beer. 

eniine had run the full 
;t." Mullins point- '.lit. "la//. 

-wim:. pizzicato, mambo, calyps 

never -.'I to rock "n" roll I"-' .iii-i' b) 
then we were working on other 
thin - 

3 J Burch. BB1 K » -up. 

nut : 

"\\ hen we found our slogan foi 
1957, we needed a new jingle t..i 

Campaign I ai ge to 1 
life 




Burgermeister used no advertising from 

1868 till 1944 when it moved into air media. Sales 

sinee have increased 10-fold, brand is No. 2 



one that could underline an entire 60- 
second spot and that would wear well. 
1 1 lort, like any popular tune that 
hes "D. it must be good enough so 
that repeated playing would make it 
terrific." 

In line with the new approach, 
Burgermeister wanted maximum view- 
er identification, with a theme that 
would carry over into its outdoor. 
Burgermeister decided to put people 
on its boards in 1957, so what was 
more logical than to put the same 
people — a young couple — in the spots? 

"We planned a series of inter-link- 
ing boards and spots, pegged to the 
seasons," says Lou Rolle. *'To empha- 
size that beer belongs with the pleasant 
things of life, our spots would be: bar- 
becue, beach, patio, gardening, fire- 
side, boat painting (a hobby), party 
i to sell our quart bottles), mountain 



lodge and sidewalk cafe." 

Rolls explained that the last two 
were designed to stimulate tavern 
trade, which has fallen off, he said, 
for all brands in the past few years. 

"At the same time," he pointed out, 
"60 to 70' '( of all beer sales goes into 
the home market, hence our slant to- 
ward women. It's mama shopping who 
helps decide what beer papa will 
drink." 

Work on the jingle started in Sep- 
tember of last year. Joe Hornsby and 
Ben Allen, BBDO, New York, jingle 
men, got to work. "Some 30 to 40 
jingles were tried out," Jim Burch re- 
called. "We tried everything, even 
more public domain tunes, in our 
search. 

Finally, they decided on a jingle by 
Song Ads, and the filming of the spots 
began at Universal-International stu- 



dios, under the supervision of John 
Alexander, production head for Burgie 
at the BBDO Hollywood office. 

Alexander told sponsor each spot 
cost about $4,000, with an additional 
cost of several hundred dollars for 
shooting an alternate ending, required 
for Washington and Oregon, where 
women cannot be shown holding an 
alcoholic beverage in any advertising. 

The first radio spots were ready in 
December 1956, tested on the air for 
two weeks that month and found satis- 
factory . 

But the campaign itself basically 
started 15 January with 24-sheets 
using the couple and the new slogan: 
"Its so much more refreshing." Radio 
spots followed in February. A six- 
week tv saturation began 3 March, 
followed by a 13-week evele the middle 
of Max . 

In April, "the timid soul" appeared 
in I.D.'s — a lovable, well-meaning lit- 
tle man who stumbled over a tennis net 
or got splashed on a curbstone, arous- 
ing the viewer's sympathy, whereupon 
the jingle asked the theme line: 
"Wouldn't a nice, cool Burgie go good 



Broadcast Strategy in key markets is plotted by BBDO people and Burgermeister advertising manager, Les 
Mullins. Shown (1. to r.) : Neil Crandall, J. G. Motheral. Manager BBDO San Francisco, Les Mullins, Mack 
Chandler, Charles Russell, radio-tv department head, Jim Burch, Lou Rolle, and Frances Lindh, timehuyer 





First idveftbing campaign given impetus 
in I'M I l>\ Burgie president, Henrj Pii ard 




Founder's grandson, Charles Luxmann, Jr. 
supervises production "l Burgermeister 




Successful selling in rough maiket is j « » 1 • 
of 0>>" McAfee, Burgie sales manage) 



right now'.'' . . . Burgermeister Beer, 
it's so much more refreshing." Play- 
house Pictures produced four I.I).-. 
drawn to story boards prepared l>\ 
BBDO. 

*'In placing the spots." Rolle ex- 
plained, "we use an average rating 
point schedule. There are certain fig- 
ure- we consider saturation, based on 
rating points. We bu\ as main spots 
as necessary to achieve that level. 

"In radio, the spots are balanced 
prett\ evenly between daytime and 
nighttime. In daytime buying, we em- 
phasize traffic times. During a satu- 
ration schedule. Burgie places from 2~> 
radio spots a week in small markets to 
200 or more in major markets. \ll 
radio markets in the wesl are used. 

"In tv we use T-i or more t\ stations 
throughout the west Saturation runs 
from four spots a week in smaller mar- 
kets to as main as needed to meet the 
competitive situation in a larger mar- 
ket. Our rating basis for placement 
and need to reach both men and wom- 
en rules out most daytime t\. 

"In Los Vngeles, all seven station- 
are used during saturation, whereas a 
normal schedule calls for about three. 
On the other hand, in San Francisco, 



.ill three stations are u-cJ year-round. 

IN i; li-t- Burgie a- spending 12 i I 
100 in t\ the fii-t quartet of I'' >. the 
t\ campaign started 3 March), rank- 
ing No. Inn national!} a- .1 spot tv 
advertiser. I he estimate foi the -• 1 
ond quarter 1- v 106,800, plai ing them 
No. •">!! in -pot expenditun 

'"\\ e were naturall) quite interest- 
ed, Rolle -aid. "in knowing how w ill 

the new jingle w.i- doing in relation to 
the previous jingle, a- well a- in rela- 
tion to othei popular jingles on the 
air. I5|{|)(>- research department de- 
veloped a technique whii li has enabled 
11- to -ample public reaction verj satis- 
factorily. \\r found, loi example, that 
the new jingle had heeil heard b\ 96' i 

of the people, while Clementine had 
been heard b) 95' - . 

"On masked name and product iden- 
tification, both jingles wen- correct!) 
identified bj 6095 ol those h ho had 
heard them. None ol the control j in- 
ide- ll-ed in the -tlld\ exceeded the-e 

figures. Since the new jingle had been 

in use lor onlj -:\ month-, and the old 
jingle bad been used in various forms 
for ll) \ear-. we tell thi- wa- a satis- 
factory perfoi mance. 
"What was even more satisfactory 

Was the I. Hi thai the new jingle wa- 

better liked b) an appreciabl) greatei 
percentage "f the people interviewed 

than either the old jingle or the gela I- 
ed 'control' jingle. 

"In the mallei ol viewer projection 



mi t\ which wed been seeking, it - in- 
teresting to nod- that most married 
pei sons 1 lassified the . ouple a- n 
ried, most single persona a- unmarried 
Reactions would indicate preference 
1 ne spot ovei anothei largely be- 

1 .iii-i- thai - w hat w e do' again idem 

1 iln ation." 

The biggest barometei of mi . ■ 
i2 1 bai rels were -old in Julj 1957, 

making thi- the best month in the 

brewery's history. [Tie figure 1- al- 
most as mm h loi a mouth a- Bui 

-old in a \e,n bai k in 1944 when 
Heiir\ I.. Picard, now president of 
Km get meister, took over management 
of the then San I ram i-> Brew ing 
< 01 p.. insl ituted a policy of ad^ • rtia- 
ing, ami discontinued all brand- except 
but rie. Founded in 1868 bj the Lur- 
iii.iiin ami '.aim- families, the • 

pans - (red., had been until then ",.111 

advertising i- in the bottle." 

Burgei meistei also pioneered in the 
field of -port-, asting. In 195 '.. the) 
I egan sponsorship of the Rams and 
I9ei gamea in radio. Success with pro 
football on radio led to sponsorship of 
eight games in the Dumonl h package 
in 1954. Results were so bu< i essful 

that when the club- sold theii l\ rights 

independently, Burgie bought them 
and ran the games on the fast-growing 

\i'.< I \ western network. 

I. ou Rolle believes the problems in 
packaging gamea regional!) can best 
I Please turn in /></_- 1 I 




A Toast with Burgie by (L to r.) Dton Rule, KABC-Tl stal 

Mack Chandler, BBDO; Les Muffins, Burgie adv. manager; Lon Rolle, BBDO 

account group supervisor I 5 signing Country Imerica 



SPONSOR 



28 SEPTEMBER 1957 



33 



'* 



WILL TV GET ITS OWN^ABC"? 




As the NARTB unveils its tv circulation study after five years 
work, one question is: How badly does the industry want it? 
Early indications are that it is not sure, though broadcasters 
have consistently cited the need for tv station circulation data 



#%fter five years of successes and 
failures, doubt and enthusiasm, second- 
thoughts and decisions, the NARTB's 
tv circulation study is being unveiled 
to the industry with a remarkable lack 
of hullabaloo. 

Though it may seem odd to pose the 
question after five years of waiting — 
Will the industry go for it? — at the 
moment, there is no assurance that it 
will. 

Despite the fact that industry peo- 
ple have consistently cited the need for 
circulation data (and bought such in- 
formation from ARB, Nielsen and 
SAMS), a number of factors are caus- 
ing soul-searching about the new stud) 
among tv stations, early reactions in- 
dicate. 

It is, of course, true that the unveil- 
ing process is not completed. Facts 
about the new study, which is com- 
pared to the print media's Audit Bu- 
reau of Circulation, are being revealed 
to industry people at a series of 
NARTB regional conferences that be- 
gan 16 September and will not be con- 
cluded until 26 October. 

However : 

• There are still a number of ques- 
tions that remain to be answered. For 
example: How will the study finally 



be set up? Will it be like the Audit 
Bureau of Circulation? How much 
say will advertisers and agencies have? 
There are also some questions of meth- 
od to be resolved, although it is be- 
lieved that a pilot study should be able 
to answer most, if not all, of them. 

• The measurement decided on 
after years of testing and discussion 
is a far cry from the original notion 
of a circulation study that would "do 
away with ratings." 

• A lot of water has gone over the 
dam since the circulation study was 
brought up. In the interim, local rat- 
ing services have expanded and en- 
sconced themselves in all the major 
markets and a good many not-so- 
major. Though stations have always 
had reservations about ratings, most 
of them now accept the fact that they 
have to use them to sell. Since the 
early days of BMB, the industry's first 
circulation measurement, many broad- 
casters have become disenchanted with 
coverage studies. Part of this is due 
to the feeling that buyers look pri- 
marily for the top station in each mar- 
ket so that such studies only help such 
stations. 

• That NARTB is telling broadcast- 
ers at the regional meetings that the 



association is not pushing the pro- 
posed circulation study. The approach 
is: It"s-entirely-up-to-you-fellows. This 
has been made clear by President Har- 
old E. Fellows. Thad H. Brown, Jr., 
vice president for tv, and Richard M. 
Allerton, manager for research. One 
reason for this attitude is that NARTB 
top brass is apparently not sure at this 
point how interested its members are 
in a circulation study. 

A clear picture of the background 
to the proposed study, probably the 
best kept secret in tv'a history, is just 
beginning to emerge. The study 
was first formally discussed by the 
NARTB's board in December 1952. 
The first matter of moment gone into 
was the Cawl formula, developed by 
Dr. Franklin Cawl. an ex-Kudner re- 
search executive. Cawls proposal in- 
volved a telephone study which would, 
through a large number of calls, meas- 
ure station audiences by time periods. 

There is no question but that the 
idea appealed to a number of broad 
casters, especially those who felt rat 
ings were an unfair measurement I 
promised detailed figures on viewing 
without pinning down audiences to spe 
cific shows. It would, for example 
show a station's audience, say, from 



34 



SPONSOR 



28 SEPTEMBER 1957 



!; : i)() io ( >:i><> p.m., bul the figure would 
be an average *>\ er a i"'i iod 01 time 
rather than a specific daj bo thai the 
n|i- .mil downs "I program popularity 
would be lost. Buyers would doI hunt 
ami pick and there would be no stand- 
ing in line for a partii -ulai K \ aluable 
slot since mi one would know which 
-lot was particularly valuable. 

The N \I!TI> c( littee studying the 

• awl plan, not butc about the techni- 
cal aspects, brought in the networks. 
W eh researi hers -aid the plan would 
have to be Btudied and validated. \i 
the -am.- time, however, tin- networks 
made clear that, whatever the merits 
of the Caul formula, the] had no in- 
tention of signing a death warrant for 
ratings. Network Belling needs, the) 

-aid. required a measure of pro-rain 
audiences. 

\ long and complicated history of 
study, discussion and testing followed. 
The Advertising Research Foundation 
was brought in. \|{l"s managing di- 
rector. A. \\ . Lehman, appointed a 

Committee which included such name- 
as Blow's research director Larrj 
Deckinger (no* media chief at Gre\ i. 
K\l - Bud Sherak, now research direc- 
tor. Later, questionnaire studies were 
done by the Politz and Crossley S-D 
outfits. The NARTB's research sub- 
committee, consisting of network re- 
search chiefs, worked on the project 
until this past June. At the time the 
group dissolved, it consisted of Hugh 
Beville, chairman, \BC: Don Coyle, 
\IH:: Ja\ Eliasberg, CBS. and Melvin 
Goldberg, Westinghouse. Certainly, 
there was no lack of I. rains involved. 
I lie original idea of measuring small 
periods of time was soon dropped as 
not workable for both financial and 
technical reasons. The NARTB then 
Fell hack on measuring three-hour da) 
parts but a retreat was sounded in 
that area. too. 

\ major hreakthrough came when 
a questionnaire designed b) Crossle) 
seemed to finally solve most of the 
problems involved in asking people 
over the phone what stations they lis- 
ten to. One problem was to eliminate 
respondent biases in favor of "pres- 
tige" stations and in favor of network 
affiliates in areas where there were 
also independents, \fter the \ARTR 
appropriated some more money i prob- 
ably about £200.000 has been spent 
altogether on the project") the ques- 
tionnaire was tested in Paterson. \. J., 
with seven signals and High Point. 



V ( . with L2 signals includin uhf, 
and compare I w ith the results from 
mechanical recordei - 

The conclusion ol the network n- 
-, arch group is that a woi kable 
method ha- I <cn developed, which 

mean-, in le-eareh Ian ;U8ge, thai the 

method is damn good. Furthermon 

the use of recorders i mpare w ith 

the telephone results pnn ided the vali- 
dating that i- loo often lacking in the 

audience measurement held. 

The method would provide dail) 
and weekl) circulation figures on a 
county-by-count) basis. \m home 
thai reports 15 minutes or more ol con- 



tinuous i iewing on a weekl) oi d 
basis i- counted. Set ownership b) 
, ountiea would also I"- pro\ ided Sub- 
-, i ibei - would get new infoi mation 

mnuall) . 
In the all-importanl area ol < osts, 

Vllerton estimates thai the first year's 

I ..-I would be about 11.2 million with 

some reduction in expenses aftei thai 
I his i- about on a pai w ith the total 

. osl -I Nl S No. :.'. which included 

ladio. and to which 1 1 < > t\ Stations 

-ub-< i ibed. It i- estimated thai if 60' ! 
.,i .in rentl) operating Btations partici- 
pate, Bubsi i ibei i osts h ill range from 
$1,100 to 125,000 with an overall a\- 
f $4,500. & 




New study would gather circula- 
tion data through telephone calls on a 
count] by-county basis once a year 



Basis of measurement would be 
homes continuous!) viewing 15 min- 
utes or more dail] and weekly 





Set ownership figures would also 
be provided. Method waa tested by 
comparing phone data with meters 



BEFORE A STUDY CAN TAKE PLACE . . . 

. . . the industry has to approie it. I tei ona \ IRTB neetingi 

going on and lasting through 26 October are providing broadcasters with their first 
detailed glimpse of the method. If reaction is favorable, the Tv Board will decide 
the next step, probably an all-industry conference to select form of organization. 

. . . some basic decisions hate to be made. For example: To what ■ 
agencies and advertisers participate? Will they be called upon to contribute finan- 
cially? Should figures on non-subscriber stations be included in the survey reports? 

... a pilot survey will probably be run off. This uill not be done unless general 
industry approval of the circulation study concept is forthcoming since the pilot 
studv will involve additional \ iRTH funds. Probably about $200,000 has been spent 
so far. Among the technical problems to be solved includes the matter oi gathering 
information on tv ownership in non-telephone homes through a telephone study. There 
is also the question oi what to do about homes which don't answer phone or questions. 



SPONSOR 



28 SEPTEMBER 1957 



35 




SOME OF OUR CLIENTS HAVE EXPRESSED WONDERMENT 

Because for years we have delivered the rich market of Hometown and 
Rural America neatly arranged in potent parcels for advertisers, some of our 
clients have expressed wonderment. 

When an advertiser uses Keystone Broadcasting System, his choice of the area 
he wishes to cover is expertly and efficiently packaged for him ... 90 or 900 
stations in this busy, buying market . . . tailored to fit his selling 
needs with no muss or fuss. 

We're no "one man band" — but Keystone's service is the most integrated, 
direct-result method of advertising and selling in Hometown and Rural America 
—971 stations affiliated to cover 90 million listeners who represent 
the largest audience in the market. 

What's your story? And how can Keystone help you tell it to Hometown 
and Rural America? 




Send for our new station list 

CHICAGO NEW YORK LOS ANGELES SAN FRANCISCO 

111 W, Washington 



527 Madison Ave. 
Eldorado 5-3720 



3142 Wilshire Blvd. 
DUnkirk 3-2910 

. i minute or a full hour— it's 



57 Post St. 
SUrter 1-7440 



STate 2-8900 

• TAKE YOUR CHOICE. A handful of stations or the network 
up to you, your needs. 

• MORE FOR YOUR DOLLAR. No premium cost for individualized programming. Network 
coverage for less than some "spot" costs. 

• ONE ORDER DOES THE JOB. All bookkeeping and details are done by Keystone, yet the best 
time and place are chosen for you. 



36 



SPONSOR 



28 SEPTEMBER 1957 



/• 



TV BASICS/OCTOBER 



FALL TV SWEEPSTAKES ARE ON 

SPONSOR'S network Comparagrapfa for the nexl four weeks «:i\«H 
details as the lineup lor the 1957-58 season falls into placet 
(iliarts also show sponsored hours 1»\ network and average costs 



•J he next four weeks will see the 
final pieces <>f the network t\ jigsaw 
fall into place. 

More than 2.") regular nighttime 
sponsored shows will make their dehut 

or return to the air during the period 

covered 1>\ sponsor's next Compara- 

graph. The period covers the critical 
four-weeks beginning 2!! September 
and ending 25 October. 

In addition to the sponsored night- 
time shows, there are changes in the 
daytime schedule, new sustainers it 



night and man) specials — 12 in all 
On top of this i- a complicated pat 
tern ol sponsors coming in and going 
out. Hlis acti\ its i- particulai lj <-\ i 
dent at nighl as the new season begins 
The drtail> of these changes, includ 

Ulg program cost-, name- of spon-or- 

and agencies, dates in which changes 
were made, etc., can be found in the 
follow inu pages. 

\mong the new programs to hit the 
air during the 28 Septemlier-25 Octo- 
ber period on ABC alone will be 11 ul- 



in it incheli I </<•. / omhstone I ei < itoi \ . 
Gw) Mitchell Show, Zorro, The Real 
McCoys, Pal Boone s //"». Patrice 
Munsel s lnm . Frank Sinatra s li"u and 
Colt .45. 

< )u CBS, new -how- include 20th 
Century, tssighment Foreign Legion, 
Leave it i<> Beaver and Dick <md tfir 
Duchess. On M'.<:. there will be the 
Ucoa-Goodyeai dramatic half hour-. 
Suspicion, Court <>i /./;•>/ Resort, (lull 
Oasis, Gisele WacKenzie and // haft 

1 1 For.'' ^ 



1. THIS MONTH IN NETWORK TV 

Network Sales Status Week Ending 28 September 



■Hi MMNM 



Live 

0.0 ABCi 

97.0 CBSt 

88.4 NBC 

♦K^rUMlnc pa: 



Daytime 

SPONSORED HOURS 



4.0 



32.9 



23.6 



% 

Live 
I 25.8 ABC 
I 41.6 CBS 

56.4 NBC 



Nighttime 

SPONSORED HOURS 



25.5 



24. 



AVERAGE COST OF NETWORK SPONSORED PROGRAMING 



Cost Number 


Cost Number 


Cost Number 


Cost Number 


Hour drama 
$63,111 9 


Half-hour drama 
$25,382 17 


Situation comedy 
$26,634 15 


Hour corned] ■▼ariet] 

$59,499 8 

Pavtime serials 
$10,429* 7 


Half-hour comedy-var. 
$39,850 5 


Half-hour adventure 
$29,998 12 


Quiz 

$25,274 11 



Arerages are as of August. 'Per ueek M five quarter-hour sho^ - crams are once-weekly and are all Dlrhttlme shows. 



SPONSOR • 28 SEPTEMBER 195*3 



" 






Sponsored Nighttime Network Programs 6-11 


p. m. 


PROGRAM 


COST 


SPONSORS AND AGENCIES 


PROGRAM 


COST 


SPONSORS AND AGENCIES 


Alcoa-Goodyear Anthology: 


$40,000 


Alcoa, FSR; alt Goodyear, Y&R 


Tennessee Ernie Ford Show : 


38,000 


Ford, JWT 

Gen Elect, BBDO 


Dr-F (10/20 start) 






Va-L 




•Steve Mli'n Shov. : V-L 


108,000 


S. C. Johnson, Ncedham, Louis & 


G.E. Theatre: Dr-F 


47,000 






Brorby; Pharmacraft, )WT; Grey- 
hound, Grey 


•George Gobel: V-L 


115,000 


RCA & Whirlpool, K&E 


Assignment Foreign Legion: 


18.500 


P. Lorillard, L&N 


Godfrey's Scouts: V-L 


(alt wks) 

32,000 


Lipton, Y&R; Toni, North 


A-F (10/1 start) 
Eve \ i . tin : Sc-F 


36.500 


Lever, JWT; alt Shulton, Wesley 


Gunsmoke: W-F 


38,000 


L&M, DFS; Sperry Rand (1 wk in 41 1 
Y&R 


Armstrong Circle Theatre: 


43,000 


Armstrong Cork, BBDO 


Harbourmaster: A-F 


38.000 


R. J. Reynolds, Esty; alt wk open 


Dr-L (10/2 start) 


(alt wks) 




Have Gun, Will Travel: W-F 


33,000 


Whitehall, Bates; alt Lever, JWT 


Bachelor Father: Sc-F 


38,500 


Amcr Tobacco, BBDO 


Hitchcock Presents: My-F 


36,000 


Bristol-Myers, Y&R 




(alt wks) 




Robin Hood: A-F 


26,500 


Johnson & Johnson, Y&R; Wildroo 


Red Barber's Corner: Sp-L 


3,000 


State Farm Ins, NLB 


I Love Lucy: Sc-F 


35,300 


BBDO 
Cold Seal, Campbell-Mithun; a 
Sheaffer, Seeds 


Beat the Clock: Q-L 


18,000 


Hazel Bishop, Spector; alt wk open 




(last 9/27) 






I've Got a Secret: Q-L 


24.000 


R. ). Reynolds, Esty 


Jack Benny: C-F 


65,000 


Amer Tobacco, BBDO 


•Kraft Tv Theatre: Dr-L 


50,000 


Kraft, JWT 




(alt wks) 




Lassie: A-F 


34,000 


Campbell Soup, BBDO 


Polly Bergen: V-L 


47,000 


Max Factor, DDB 


Leave It To Beaver: Sc-F 


46,000 


Remington Rand, Compton; alt wl ■ 


(9/21 start) 






(10/4 start) 




open 


*Big Record: Mu-L 


100,000 


Oldsmobile, Brother; Pillsbury, Bur- 


•Life of Riley: Sc-F 


30,500 


Lever Bros, BBDO 


Blondie: Sc-F 


37.500 


nett; alt Armour, FC&B; Kellogg, 
Burnett 
Nestle, B. Houston; Toni, Tatham- 


Line-up: My-F 
(9/27 start) 


31,000 


P&C, Y&R; Brown & Williamson, 
Bates 


(last 9/27) 




Laird, C. E. Frank 


M Squad: My-F 


31,000 


Amer Tobacco, SSC&B; alt H. Bishop! 
Spector 


Bold Journey: A-F 


8,500 


Ralston Purina, CBB 


Gisele MacKenzie: V-L 


46,000 


Eversharp, B&B; alt Scott, JWT 


Pat Boone: Va-L 


45,000 


Chevrolet, Campbell-Ewald 


(9/28 start) 






(10/3 start) 






Perry Mason: My-F 


80,000 


Purex, Weiss; alt Libby-Owcns-Ford 


Jim Bowie: W-F 


32,000 


Amer Chicle, DFS 






F&S&R: and National Carbon (9, 


Bowling Stars: Sp-L 





Amer Machine & Foundry, Richards 


Maverick: W-F 


70,000 


28 start) Esty 
Kaiser Aluminum, Y&R 


(9/22 start) 
Broken Arrow: W-F 


31,000 


Miles, Wade; Asso Products (last 9/ 
24) Crey; Ralston Purina (10 1 


The Real McCoys: Sc-F 
(10/3 start) 


35,000 


Sylvania, JWT 






start) Gardner 


Meet McGraw: My A-F 


33,000 


P&C, Benton & Bowles 


Burns & Allen: Sc-F 


40,000 


Carnation, Wasey; Goodrich (last 9/ 


Meet the Press: I-L 


7,500 


Open 






23) BBDO; Cen Mills (10 7 start) 
BBDO 


Millionaire: Dr-F 


34,000 


Colgate, Bates 


The Calif ornians: W-F 


37,500 


Singer Sewing, Y&R 


Guy Mitchell: MuV-L 


38.000 


Max Factor, Anderson-McConnell 


Cavalcade of Sports: Sp-L 


45,000 


Gillette. Maxon 


(10/7 start) 






* Chevy Show: Va-L 


1 50,000 


Chevrolet, Camp-Ewald 


Moment of Decision: Dr-F 


36,000 


Ford, JWT 


(10/20 start) 






(last 9/25) 


41 ,000 


Colgate, L&N; R. J. Reynolds, Esty 


Cheyenne: W-F 


90,000 


Cen Elect. Y&R, BBDO & Crey 


Mr. Adams & Eve: Sc-F 






Circus Boy: A-F 


34,000 


Mars. Knox Reeves; alt Kellogg, Bur- 
nett 


Patrice Munsel: MuV-L 
(10/18 start) 


45,000 


Buick, Kudner; Frigidaire, Kudner 


•Rosemary Clooney: V-L 


42,000 


Lever Bros, JWT 


Name that Tune: Q-L 


23,000 


Kellogg, Burnett; Whitehall, Bates 


Climax: Dr-L 


59,000 


Chrysler, Mc-E 


Navy Log: Dr-F 


38.500 


Amer Tobacco (last 10 9) SSCB, U.S. 


Club Oasis: V-L 


58,000 


L&M, Mc-E 






Rubber; F. D. Richards 


(9/28 start) 






NBC News: N-L 


9,500ft 


Ronson, NC&K; Clidden, Meldrum ■ 


Colt .45: W-F 

(10/18 start) 
•Perry Como: V-L 


37,000 
140,000 


Campbell, BBDO 

Kimberly-Clark, FCB; Noxzema, SS 


Original Amateur Hour: V-L 
O.S.S.: A-F 


23,000 
28,750 


Fewsmith 
H. Bishop, Spector 
Mennen, Mc-E 






C&B; RCA & Whirlpool, K&E; Sun- 


Pantomime Quiz: Q-L 


8,000 


Amer Oil, J. Katz; Hamm, Camp- 






beam, Perrin-Paus; Amer Dairy, 


(last 9/7) 




Mithun; Time-Life, Y&R 


Country Music Jubilee: ML 


18,000 


Campbell-Mithun; Knomark, Mogul 
Williamson-Dickie, Evans and Assoc, 
(alt wks 8:30-9); co-op 8-8:30 


People Are Funny: M-F 
People's Choice: Sc-F 


24.000 
34,000 


R. J. Reynolds, Esty; Toni, North 
Borden, Y&R; P&C (last 9 26) Y&R; 
Amer Home Products (10 3 start), 


Court of Last Resort: Dr-F 


28,000 


Lorillard, L&N 






Y&R 


(10/4 start) 
Crossroads: Dr-F 


31.000 


Chevrolet, Camp-Ewald 


Person To Person : I-L 
(9/13 start) 


34,000 


Amer Oil, J. Katz; Hamm, Camp- 
Mithun, alt Time-Life, Y&R 


(last 10/11) 
Bob Cummings Show: Sc-F 


36,000 


R. J. Reynolds, Esty; alt Chesebrough- 

Ponds, Mc-E 
National Carbon, Esty; 3 days open 


Playhouse 90: Dr-L&F 


39,000 
Vi hr. 


Amer Gas. L&N; Bristol-Myers. BBDO; 
Philip Morris, Burnett; Kimberly- 
Clark, FC&B; Allstate. Burnett 


John Daly News: N-L&F 


6,000tt 


•Price Is Right: Q-L 


21,500 


Speidel, K&E; alt wk open 


Date With the Angels: Sc-F 


38,000 


Plymouth, Crant 


Restless Gun: W-F 


37,500 


Warner-Lambert, SSC&B; alt sust 


Jimmy Dean: Mu-L 


20,000 


H, Bishop, Spector 


Richard Diamond: MyA-F 


13,500 


Cen Foods, B&B 


(last 9/14) 






(last 9/30) 






December Bride: Sc-F 


29,500 


Cen Foods, B&B 


Rin Tin Tin: A-F 


36,000 


Nabisco, K&E 


(10/7 start) 






Saber of London: My-F 


28,500 


Sterling Drug, DFS 


Destiny: A-F 


13,000 


Cen Foods, B&B; Ford, JWT 


Sally: Sc-F 


41,500 


Chemstrand, DD&B; alt Royal Type- 


(last 9/27) 
Dick And The Duchess: Sc-F 


33,500 


Mogen David, Weiss; H. Curtis, C. 


Schlitz Playhouse: Dr-F 


38,000 


writer, Y&R 
Schlitz, JWT 


(9/28 start) 
Disneyland: M-F 




Best 


Phil Silvers Show: Sc-F 


42,000 


P&C, Burnett; R. J. Reynolds, Esty 


75,000 


Derby, Mc-E; Cen Mills, Tatham- 


Sgt. Preston: A-F 


32,000 


Quaker Oats, WBT 




Laird: DFS; Cen Foods, Y&R; Rey- 


Frank Sinatra: ^ -F 


67,500 


Chesterfield, Mc-E 






nolds Metals, Buchanan: Frank 


(10/18 start) 
$64,000 Challenge: Q-L 






Dragnet: My-F 

Wyatt Earp: W-F 

Doug Edwards News: N-L&F 


35,000 
30.000 


L&M, DFS; Schick, B&B 

Gen Mills, DFS; P&G, Compton 


35,000 


P. Lorillard, Y&R; Revlon, BBDO 


9.500tt 


Whitehall, Bates; Brown & Wmson, 


$64,000 Question: Q-L 


39,000 


Revlon. BBDO 






Bates; Hazel Bishop, Spector 


Red Skelton: CV-L&F 


52,000 


Pet Milk, Gardner; alt S. C. Johnson, 


Father Knows Best: Sc-F 


38.000 


Scott Paper, JWT 


(10/1 start) 




FCB 


•Eddie Fisher: V-L 


115,000 


L&M, Mc-E 


Spotlight Plavhouse: A-F 


9,500 


Pet Milk, Cardner; alt S. C. Johnson; 


(10/1 start) 


(alt wks) 




(last 9/24) ' 




FCB 



*Color show, (L) Live, (F) Film, ttCost is per segment. List does not iHclude 
sustaining, participating 1 or co-op programs — see chart. Costs refer to average show 
costs including talent and production. They are gross (include 15% agency com- 
mission). They do not include commercials or time charges. This list covers period 



28 September-25 October. Program types are indicated as follows: (A) Adventure 
(Au) Audience Participation, (C) Comedy, (D) Documentary, (Dr) Drama, (I) 
Interview, (J) Juvenile, (M) Misc., (Mu) Music. (My) Mystery. (N) News, (Q) 
Quiz, (S) Serial, (Sc) Situation Comedy, (Sp) Sports, (V) Variety, (W) Western. 

/ . ■ . ' 



Listing continues on page 40 ) 



38 



SPONSOR 



28 SEPTEMBER 1957 




Pulse gives you 
BOTH 

every month 



fT\ . . . in one detailed report front 
doorbell-ringing interrieics. TV cover- 
age of the I . $.. of unparalleled sta- 
tistical accuracy. 



SPONSOR • 28 SEPTKMBER 1957 



39 




3. NIGHTTIME 



C O 




P A 



ABC 



SUNDAY 

CBS 



NBC 



MONDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 



TUESDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 



Beat The Clock 
(10/6 si 

lust 



You Are There 

(L 10/13) 

20th Century 

(111 20 Si 

Prudential 



Meet The Press 
sust 



My Friend Flick 

sust 

Pinocchio 

(15/13. I. :.iii 7 30 

Rexall 



D Edwards 
Brown & Wmson 



News 
Ron son 



No net service 



D Edwards 

Whitehall 



News 
sust 



You Asked for It 

Skinny I'eanut 

Rutter 



Lassie 

Campbell Soup 



Original 

Amateur Hour 

II liishop 



Sports Focus 

sust 



John Daly News 

sust 



N o net servi ce 

D Edwards 

Brown & Wmson 

1 1 epi al feed I 



Sports Focus 
sust 



No net service 



Sport 



News 

Rooflon 

1 1 epeal feed i 



John Daly News 
sust 



D Edwards 
Whitehall 
t feed) 



News 
(9/10 S) 
(repea' 



|ohn C 



Maverick 
(7:30-8:30) 



Bachelor Father 

alt 

lack Benny 

Amer Tobaeco 



Sally 
Ohemstrand alt 
Royal Typewriter 



Wire Service 

R. J. Reynolds 

(7:30-8:30) 

(1-9/30) 

tba 



Robin Hood 

Johnson & .Ihsn 
alt Wlldroot 



Fvice Is Right 

9pelde] alt 

sust 



Cheyenne 

Gen Electric 

(alt wks 

7:30-830) 



Name That Tune 

Whitehall all 
Kel logg 



Nat King Cole 
oo op 



Disr 
7:3 



Maverick 
Kaiser Alum. 



Ed Sullivan 
(8-9) 

Lincoln (1,9/29) 

all Mercury 

alt Kodak (10/6 S) 



Steve Allen 

S. C. Johnson 

alt 

I'liarma, Greyhnun 



Cuy Mitchell 

(10/7 SI 
Max Factor 



Burns & Allen 

Carnation alt 

(L 9/23) Goodrich 

Geo Mills (10/7 S) 



Restless Cun 

Warn Lambert 

alt sust 



Sugarfoot 

alt wks 7:30-8:30) 

Amer Chicle 

Nil Carbon 



Phil Silvers 

I'&G 

alt 

R. J. Reynolds 



George Cobel 

(alt wks. 8-9) 

RCA & Whirlpool 



Disn 

Ileynoli 

Derb: 

Geo 

Get. 



Bowling Stars 
Am Machine 
& Foundry 



The Edsel Show 

(8-9, 10/13 only) 
Bdse-1 



Steve Allen 
(8-9) 



Bold Journey 
Ralston-Purlna 



Talent Scouts 

Lipton 
alt Ton! 



Wells Fargo 

Amer Tobacco 

alt Buick 



Wyatt Earp 

Gen Mills 
alt P&G 



Eve Arden 
Lever alt 

Shulton 



Eddie Fisher 

i alt uks, 8-9) 

(10/1 Si 

L&M 



Nat 

(L 

Tom 

Ter 

■ 



C 



Open Hearing 

sust 

(9/29 S) 



E. Theatre 
Gen Electric 
DuPont Show 

49-10:30. 9/29) 
Du Pont 



Tv Playhouse 

Goodyear alt 

Alcoa l I, 9 29 1 

Chevy Show 

(9-10) (10/20 S) 



Voice of 
Firestone 

Firestone 



Whiting Cirls 

(L 9/30) 

Danny Thomas 

Gen Foods 

(10/7 S) 



Twenty-One 

Pharmaceuticals 



Broken Arrow 

Rals -Purina 

alt Miles 



To Tell The 

Truth 
Pharmaceuticals 



Meet McCraw 
P&G 



Ozzie 1 

K 



Midwestern 
Hayride 



Hitchcock 
Theatre 

llristul-Myers 



Chevy Show 

Chevrolet 

Bob Hope Show 

(10/6, 9-10) 

Times 



Welk Top Tunes 
New Talent 

Podge-Plymouth 
(9:30-10:30) 



Richard Diamond, 

(L 9/30) 
December Bride 

(10/7 S) 
Gen Foods 



Alcoa-Coodyear 
Anthology 

i!i ;;u si 
Alcoa alt 
Goodyear 



Telephone Time 
Bell 



SpotiigHr Play 

i L 9 M) 

Red Skelton 

(10/1 SI IVt Milk 

alt S. C. Johnson 



Bob Cummings 

Reynolds 
alt Chese-Ponds 



Morr 

De< 

(Ford 

Walter 

(10/2 8 



Ail-American 
Football 

sust 



$64,000 
Challenge 
Revlon alt 
P. Lorillard 



The Web 
P&G (L9/29) 
Loretta Young 

Show 
P&G (10/6S) 



Welk Top Tunes 



Studio One 

Westlnghouse 
(10-11) 



Suspicion 
(S 30 Si 

(10-11) 



It's Polka Time 

co op l L 9/24) 
West Point 
(10/8 S) Phillips- 
Jones, Carter 



S64.000 

Question 

Region 



The Californians 

Singer 



Wed 

Fi 

Meruie 

(10- 



What's My Line 
Sperry-Rand 
alt H Curtis 



75th Anniversary 

(10/13: !i-in:iii) 
Standard Oil 



Studio One 



Ford 
Philip Morris 



World News 
Special 

(10-10:30) 
(10/1 only) 
Ntl Carbon 



Assignment 

Foreign Legion 

(10/1 S) 

Lorillard 



No net service 



Famou 
10:50- 



NOTE: L preceding date means last date on air. S following date means starting date for new show or new sponsor in time slot. 



Index continued... Sponsored Nighttime Network Programs 6-11 p.m. 



PROGRAM 


COST 


SPONSORS AND AGENCIES 


Studio One: Dr-L 


55,000 


Westinghouse, Mc-E 


Sugarfoot: W-F 


40,000 
<i/ 2 hr.) 


Amer Chicle, Bates; National Carbon 
(10/1, 15, 29) Esty 


Ed Sullivan Show: V-L 


79,500 


Lincoln (last 9 291 K&E; Mercury, 
K&E; alt (10 6 start) Kodak, )WT. 
(10 13 only— Edsel, FCB) 


Sunday News Special: N-L 


9,500 


Whitehall, Bates; alt Carter Prod- 


Suspicion: My-L&F 
(9/30 start) 


79,500 


Ford, JWT; Philip Morris, Ayer; Vi 
hr alt wk open 


Tales of Wells Fargo: W-F 


38,500 


Amer Tobacco, SSC&B; alt Buick, 
Kudner 


Telephone Time: Dr-F 


31,000 


Bell, Ayer 


Theatre Time : Dr-F 


12,000 


Armour, FCB; Kimberly-Clark, FCB 


The Thin Man: My-F 


36,000 


Colgate-Palmolive, Bates 


This Is Your Life: D-L 


52,000 


P&C, BOB 


Dannv Thomas: Sc-F 
(10/7 start) 


47,500 


Ccn Foods, B&B 


Those Whiting Girls: Sc-F 
(last 9/30) 


1 1 ,000 


Cen Foods. Y&R; alt Max Factor, An- 
derson -McConnell 


•Tic Tac Dough: Q-L 


23.500 


Warner-Lambert, Lenncn & Newell; 
RCA, K&E 


Gale Storm Show: Sc-F 


39,500 


Nestle, B. Houston; Helene Curtis, 
F H Weiss 



PROGRAM 



SPONSORS AND AGENC 



To Tell The Truth: Q-L 
Tombstone Territory: W-F 

(10/16 start) 
*TV Playhouse: Dr-L 

(last 9/29) 
Track down: A-F 

(10/4 start) 
20th Century: D-F 

(10/20 start) 
20th Century Fox: Dr-F 

(last 9/25) 
Twenty-One: Q-L 
Undercurrent: Dr-F 

(last 9/27) 
U.S. Steel Hour: Dr-L 
Voice of Firestone: Mu-L 
Wagon Train: W-F 

Mike Wallace: I-L 

The Web: My-F 

(last 9/29) 
Wednesday Fights: Sp-L 



22,000 Pharmaceuticals, Parkson 

42.500 Bristol-Myers, Y&R 



52,000 Alcoa, Y&R; Goodyear, Fuller, 

& Ross 

33,500 Amer Tobacco, BBDO. alt Stj 

Mobil Oil. Compton 

45.000 Prudential, Reach McClinton 



110,000 Revlon, C. J. LaRoche 

30.000 Pharmaceuticals, Parkson 

11,500 P&C, Y&R; Brown & Wm'son, 

60,000 | U.S. Steel, BBDO 

28.000 Firestone, Sweeney & James 

25,000 Drackett. Y&R; Lewis-Howe, K»| 

l/ 2 hr. Vj hr ea wk open 

15,000 Philip Morris, Ayer 

17,000 1 P&C, B&B 

45.000 Mennen. Mc-E; Miles. Wade 



10 



SPONSOR 



28 SEPTEMBER 1957 



X G R A P H 

r 



28 SEPT. - 25 OCT. 



NESDAY 

NBC 



THURSDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 



FRIDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 



SATURDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 



trvlce 



■rds 

Wmion 



News 

Oil Mm 



Edw.irds 
Whitehall 



News 



D Edwards 

Womb 

■ ii 



News 



ervice 



Sports Focus 



News 
Ollddi - 



John Daly News 
■uit 



No net service 

D Edwards 
Whitehall 



News 



iporls focus 



|ohn Daly News 



Wagon Train 



Circus Boy 
Ki Uog| 



Sgt. Preston 
ijuukrr Can 



Tic Tac Dough 
EU v 



Rin Tin Tin 
Nibliro 



No net service 



D Edwards 

Wmion 

. ■ II : 



News 

• uit 



B. it Th. Clock 

Leave It To 
Beaver 
It 



Saber of 
London 



Bandstand 
Sat Night 






People Art 
Funny 

It J H 



DraektU 



Cowtown Rodeo 
■ I. in S) 
Zorro 

At. ' Sn a r k. T . L' p 



You Bet Your 
Harbourmaster i,f c 

" ' "■ DeSoto tit 

Teal 



Father Knows 

Best 

Scott Piper 



The Real McCoys 
Ba hania 



Climax 
Ctiryiln 

(8:30-9:30) 



|im Bowie 



West Point 
■■ 

Trackdown 

Pnbac 
ill B - 



Blondic 

Court Of Last 
Resort 

l,.rllllr.| 



Country Music 

|uhii 



Dragnet 
I.AM all 9 



Crossroads 
I. Hi II i 
Patrice Munsel 

FrUi 



Destiny 

I. • ft) 

Zanc Crcy 

I i ■ l-'irr ■ L 



Life of Riley 

LeTer 



Country Music 
lubilcc 



Mason 



Dick And The 
Duchr ss 

II c 



Como 



Klrnber: 
R. \ A Whirlpool 

- 

•-.ark 



Kraft Theatre 

Krafl i9 101 



Theatre Time 

I ' K i in 

Clark 1 1. 9 26) 

Pat Boone 
10/3 3)1 



Climax 



People's Choice 
Borden alt 

Amiit M 



Frank Sinatra 
i in 18 3 

. — 1 hr. ) 



M Squad 
Mr. Adams & Eve A T ■ 

Colgate alt Cosmic Rays 

H J Reynold! 



Lawrence Wclk 
Darin 

(910) 



Cile Storm 
• alt 
Helen* Curtla 



Polly Bergen 

■ 

Club Oasis 



Kraft Theatre 



OSS. 
kfenoon 



Playhouse 90 

Amer Gal 

alt 

Bristol Myen 



The Ford Show 
Hall of Fame 

mark 



A Date With 
The Angels 

Plymouth 



Schhti 
Playhouse 



The Thin Man 

■ 



t -*--n-c Wclk 



Have Cun Will c, 4c |,. MacKcnnc 
Travel 

.hill 
ill I. 









■n 



I Hr 

n lli 

teel 



This Is 

Your Life 

PAG 



Focus 

i. in nil 
i lo i; start 
l s B 



Playhouse 90 
Philip Morris 

alt 
Bristol Myeri 



osemary Clooncy 
i_ rei 



The Big Beat 
; li>/ll) 
Colt .45 
(10 1 

-bell 



Undercurrent 

The Lineup 
PAG 

Itnmn A '.' 



Cavalcade of 
Sports 

Gillette 
(in coneli 



Country Music 
lubilcc I- ' 
Mike Wallace 

PTillli ' 



Cunsmoke 

I.AM all 

("perry Hand 



What's It For 

PWrr.i 
Dean Martin 

Tbon 



TT-cT. 
re 

S 
Cwk 



No net service 



Playhouse 90 

Kimh Clark 

alt 

Allstate 



Jane Wyman 
II Itlsliori 
alt Quaker 



Person To Person 

Amer Oil 

A ITimm 

alt Time 



Red Barber 

St Farm ln> 



Country Music 
Jubilee 



Playhouse of 
Mystery 



Your Hit Parade 

Amer Tobacco 

alt Tori 



PROGRAM 



COST 



iwrence Welk: Mu-L 
elk Top Tunes: V-L 
est Point: Dr-F 

hat's It For: ML 
(10 12 start) 

hats My Line: Q-L 

alter Winchell File: Dr-F 

(10 2 start) 
■nathan Winters: C-L 
'ire Service: Dr-F 
me Wyman: Dr-F 

ou Are There: Dr-F 

(last 10 13) 
ou Asked For It: M-F 
ou Bet Your Life: Q-L 
ttretta Young: Dr-F 

(10 6 start) 
Your Hit Parade: Mu-L 
me Grey Theatre: A-F 

(10/4 start i 
\-F 

(10 10 start) 



14.500 
19.000 
40.000 

25.000 

29.500 
42.000 

12.500 
77.000 
36,500 

37.000 

18.000 
51.750 
42.000 

49.000 
45.000 

45.500 



SPONSORS AND AGENCIES 

Dodge. Grant 

Dodge & Plymouth. Crant 

Cen Foods Hast 9 27 1 B&B; Philhps- 

Jones 1 10 8 start i Crey; Carter 

1 10 8 start i SSCB 
Pharmaceuticals. Parkson 



Helcne Curtis, Ludgin: Sperry-Rand 

v&R 
Rcvlon. BBDO 



Lewis-Howe, DFS 

R. J. Reynolds. Wm Esty: ' j hr open 

H. Bishop. Spcctor: Quaker Oats. 



NL&B 
Prudential. Reach. 



McClinton 



Skippy Peanut Butter. CBB 
DeSoto. BBDO: Toni. North 
P&C. B&B 

Amer Tobacco. BBDO: alt Toni. North 
Cen Foods, B&B: Ford. JWT 

AC Spark Plug. Brother. 7-Up. |WT 



Specials and Spectaculars 



PROGRAM 



•Duponl Show i't the Month: 

\l 
Edsel Show: V-L 
•Hallmark Hall of Fame: 

\ I 
Bob Hope Sho* : CV-1 
" Dean Martin Show i \ -1 
Omnibns: Ml 

Pinocchio: Mu-1 
•75th tauiiversarj Show: 
V-l 

*>e.- Il Non D-F 

•Strai -mil 

Rays: Dr-F 
Wide, Wide World: Ml 

*^nr|il Series Special: 
Sp-LAF 



SI 50.000 



SPONSORS AND AGENCIES 



DuFont BBDO— 9 



$550,000* Edsel. FC&B— 10 13 
S990.000 Hallmark. FC&B— 10 17 

Sl.600.000 Time. Peck— 10 6 

$225,000 National Carbon Esty— 10 5 

$120,000 Union carbide. | M Mathcs Alum. 

num Ltd |WT 
$220,000 Roll BBDO— 10 13 

$750,000 Standard Oil Mc-E— 10 13 

Pan Amer Air | Kati— 10 6 
$1,200,000 Bell Telephone Aycr — 10 25 

$210 000 Cen Motors. McM |&A— 9 29. 10 13. 

10 27 
National Carbon Estv — 10 1 



tOf whtdi $jn« iwrt roe* to Gonzafi UnlTerslty at Bind Owby's betiest. 



SPONSOR 



28 SEPTEMBER 195*3 



41 




DAYTIME 



C O 




P A 



ABC 



SUNDAY 

CBS NBC 



Lamp Unto My 
Feet 
nut 



Look Up & Live 

SUSt 



UN In Action 

SUSt 



Camera Three 

SUSt 



Let's Take Trip 

SUSt 



Wild Bill Hickok 
Kellogg 



Johns Hopkins 
File 7 

(10/6 S) 
sust 



Dean Pike 
(10/6 S) 

SUSt 



College News 
Conference 

(9/22 S) 



Paul Winchell 

(9/29 S) 
Hartz Mtn 



Heckle & |eckle 
sust 



No net service 

Football Preview 

(9/29 S) 

Carter alt sust 



Pro-Football 

(2-concI.) 



Pabst 

Standard Oil 

Ntl Brewing 

Ballantlne 



Amer Liberty 
Oil 

'allstaff Brewing 
(9/8 S) 



Pan Amer Oil 

rhllip Morris 

(9/29 S) 



(See above) 



(See above) 



Frontiers of 
Faith 

sust 



No net service 



Wisdom 

sust 



Youth Wants 
To Know 

sust 



Look Here 

sust 



Wide Wide 

World 

(4-5:30. alt wks) 

Gen Motors 



Omnibus 

(4-5:30, alt wks) 

(10/20 S) 
Union Carbide 
Aluminum Ltd. 



College News 
sust (L 9/15) 
Texas Rangers 
(9/22 S) Sweet, 
Flav-R-Straw 



Open Hearing 

sust (L 9/15) 

Lone Ranger 

(9/22 S) 

Gen Mills 



Face The Nation 

sust 

See It Now 

(10/6 only, 5-6) 

Pan Amer Oil 



World News 
Round-Up 

sust 



Wide Wide 

World 

alt 

Omnibus 



Outlook 

sust 



ABC 



MONDAY 

CBS NBC 



American 
Bandstand 

(3-4:30) 
partic & co-op 



Carry Moore 
Campbell Soup 

(L 9/30) 

Lever Bros alt 

(10/7 S) Campbell 



Arthur Codfrey 
Stand Brands 

Stand Brands 



Bristol-Myers 



Strike It Rich 
Colgate 



Hotel 
Cosmopolitan 

sust 



Love of Life 
Amer Home Prod 



Search for 

Tomorrow 

P&G 



Cuiding Light 
P&G 



News and Stand 
Up & Be Counted 

(L 9/2) 
News (1:25-1:30) 

(9/9 S) sust 



As the World 
Turns 
P&O 



Our Miss Brooks 

(L 9/1) 

Beat The Clock 

(9/16 S) 

sust 



Art Linkletter 
Stand Brands 



Campbell Soup 



Big Payoff 

Colgate 



American 
Bandstand 



American 
Bandstand 



Do You Trust 
Your Wife? 

(9/30 S) 
sust 



Mickey Mouse 
Club (L 9/23) 

Superman 

[9/30 S) Kellogg. 

Sweets Co. 



Wckey Mouse 

Club 

(9/30 S> 

% co-op 

Vz sust 



Verdict Is Yours 

sust 



Brighter Day 
P&G 



Secret Storm 
Amer Home Prod 



Edge of Night 
P&G 

Stand Brands 



Arlene Francis 
sust 



Sterling (9/23 S) 



Treasure Hunt 

sust 



Price Is Right 
sust 

Lanolin Plus 
(10/14 S) Mentho 



Truth or 
Consequences 

sust 



Sust alt 
(9/23 S) Sterling 



Tic Tac Dough 

P&G alt 

Church & Dwight 

Ton! alt P&G 



It Could Be You 

Sust alt 

(10/7 S) Pharma 

sust alt P&G 



Close-Up 

co-op 



Club 60 

(tide change 9/23) 

Howard Miller 

co-op 



Howard Miller 



Bride & Groom 

sust alt (L 9/2) 

Ton! 



Matinee 
(3-4) 
partic 



Matinee 



Juecn for a Day 
Lanolin alt 

(10/14 S) Mentho 
Toni alt Brown 
& Williamson 



P&G 



vlodern Romances 

Sterling Drug 

alt sust 



Comedy Time 

sust 

sust alt 

10/17 S) Pharma 



ABC 



TUESDAY 

CBS 



NBC 



Carry Moore 

Gerber alt 

(9/1 S) Gen Food 

Florida Citrus 

alt Vick Chem 



Arthur Codfrey 
Mutual of Omaha 

Peter Paul 
(10/8 S) alt sust 



Pharmacraft 
( 10 /1 S) alt sust 
Gen Foods 
alt (10/8 S) 
Peter Paul 



Strike It Rich 
Colgate 



Hotel 
Cosmopolitan 
sust alt Tonl 



Love of Life 
\uier Home Prod 



Search for 

Tomorrow 

P&G 



Cuiding Light 
P&G 



Arlene Francis 

sust 



sust alt 
(9/17 S) Sterling 



Treasure Hunt 
sust 



Price Is Right 

sust alt 

(9/ 17 S) Ster ling 

Chese-Ponds 

alt sust 



Truth or 

Consequences 

■ust 



Tic Tac Dough 

Stand Brands 



News and Stand 

Up & Be Counted 

(L 9/3) 

News 

(1:25-1:30) sust 



American 
Bandstand 

(3-4:30) 
partic & co-op 



American 
Bandstand 



American 
Bandstand 



Do You Trust 

Your Wife? 

(10/1 S) 

sust 



Mickey Mouse 
Club (L 9/24) 
Sir Lancelot 
(10/1 S) Kellogg 
alt Wander Co. 



Mickey Mouse 

Club 

(10/1 S) 

Mars alt Armour 



NOTE: L preceding date means last date on air. S following date means starting date for new show or new sponsor in time slot 



As the World 

Turns 

P&G 



Virk Chem 
alt sust 



Brooks (L 9/10) 
Beat The Clock 

(9/17 S) 

Ne stle (9/24 S) 

Gerber 



Art Linkletter 

Swift 

alt Toni 

Kellogg 



Big Payoff 

sust 



Verdict Is Yours 
sust 



Swift 
alt Toni 



Brighter Day 
P&G 



Secret Storm 
Amer Home Prod 



Edge of Night 
P&G 



Florida Citrus 

alt 
Vick Chemical 



It Could Be Yoi 

Chese-Ponds 

alt iuit 

Brillo 

alt P&G 



Close-Up 
co-op 



Howard Miller 
co-op 



Howard Miller 



Bride (7 oroorn 
Brillo alt sust 



Matinee 
(3-4) 
partic 



Matinee 



Queen for a Day 
Stand Brands 



P&G 



Modern Romances 

Brillo alt 
(9 '17 S) Sterling 



Comedy Time 

Chese-Ponds 

sust alt 



Club ( >| 
Wild Bil 
(10/2 S 
alt Swi 



HOW TO USE SPONSOR'S 
NETWORK TELEVISION 
COMPARAGRAPH & INDEX 



The network schedule on this and preceding pages (40, 41) 
includes regularly scheduled programing 28 September to 
25 October, inclusive (with possible exception of changes 
made by the networks after presstime I . Irregularly sched- 
uled programs to appear during this period are listed 
as well, with air dates. The only regularly scheduled pro- 
grams not listed are: Tonight. NBC, 11:15 p.m.-l:00 

42 



4GRAPH 



SEPT. - 25 OCT. 



iNESDAY 

l NBC 



THURSDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 



ABC 



FRIDAY 

CBS 



NBC 



SATURDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 



Arlcnc Francis 
■ust 



Treasure Hunt 
•ml 



C.urv Moore 
NMtlt all 

lUlt 

ll "lit 

r.iodi 



Arlcnc Francis 



Arthur Codfrcy 



Treasure Hunt 
■Ult 



Carry Moore 

■ 'III ll! 
Bunilil I 

0»rli-- 

NuruM 



Johruon A Johnson 
•It Cil l-trklni 



Arlene Francis 
luit 



Treasure Hunt 
Mil 



' alt 



igaroo 

I. 



Mighty Mouse 

nu 



Howdy Doody 

. ■ ■ 



Cumby 



Price Is Right 

•l» lit 

< 
n Plus 
ult SOS 



I 



Price Is Right 

•Ult 



Minn Mining 
•It mil 



-T lit 

F lorida Citr ui 
Ocn Mllli 



Price Is Right 

•It 

II H) 



Su-.jn s Show 



Fury 
Orn K-xrfi 



Truth or 

Consequences 

lust 



I-erer 



Strike It Rich 
Colgate 



Truth or 
Consequences 

lust 
Alberto Culver 

• It Mllei 



Strike It Rich 
Colgate 



Truth or 
Consequences 

• It mil 






I H.t 

Saturday 
Playhouse 



Capt Callant 
lUIni 



Tic Tac Dough 
' all 
[, 8 U 
iD/11 S) 
PAO 



It Could Be You 
Con Foods 

alt Arunmr 



Brao n A Wmson 
tit Com Itosl 



Hotel 
Cosmopolitan 



Love ot Life 
■ne Prod 



Tic Tac Dough 
grift 

tflDJMIOta Mining 

• ll PAO 



Search for 

Tomorrow 

PAO 



It Could Be You 

Albert" 
alt U 



Cuiding Light 
PAO 



PAO alt 

aust 



Hotel 
Cosmopolitan 



Tic Tic Dough 
Starklil Tuna 
alt - 



Love of Life 
I rue Prod 



v\<; 



Big Top 
Jimmy 



True Story 

i 



Search for 
Tomorrow 

I •.Ml 



It Could Be You 

HI alt 



Jimmy Dean 



Cuiding Light 

I'll) 






rt Diary 



Close-Up 
co-op 



u.cws and Stand 
Jp & Be Counted 

i ■ 

News 

0) lust 



Close-Up 
co-op 



News and Stand 
Up & Be Counted 

I- 

News 

1:30) suit) 



Close-Up 
co-op 



Lone Ranger 

■ 
alt NViiif 



Howard Miller 
co op 



As the World 
Turns 

PAO 
Pillsbury 



Howard Miller 
co-op 



As the World 
Turns 

r.M. 

Swift . - 
alt luit 



Howard Miller 
co-op 



Dmy Dean 

ro OJP 



No net serine* 



No net aervico 



No fief lirvlfi 

Leo Durocher's 

Warmup 

co on 

World Swies 

Baseball 

1 S) 



Howard Miller 



Bride & Groom 
■oit 



Lanolin Plus 
;i ll si Drackelt 



Brooks (I. IS) 
Beat The Clock 
Nestle alt lust 



Howard Miller 



Sunshine Biscuit 

all PiifT 



■ 
Beat The Clock 

Howard Miller 

no Biscuit 

- I • . ■ i 



Bride & Croom 
Art Linkletter Minn. Mining 

Kellogg alt init 

.11 Cti 
alt Mllea (10 17 8) 



Pillsbury 



Art Linkletter 
F^CTfr Broi 
s»ift alt 



Bride & Croorr 
' alt 
(10 /11 8) Mo ntho 

lust alt 
9,20 8) Uraekell 



Baseball 

ICOn • 

irner Nafrty Raxor 
Philip Morrli 



Baseball Came 

of the Week 

• I'.'fulng 



Matinee 

13-11 
panic 



American 

Bandstand 

(3-4:30) 

partlc A co-op 



Big Payoff 
•ust 



Matinee 



American 
Bandstand 



* 



crdict Is Yours 

■ Ult 



Matinee 
13 ti 
partlc 



American 
Bandstand 
I 30) 
partlc A co-op 



Big Payoff 
Colgate 



Matinee 
11-41 



no net <■ 



Matinee 



American 
Bandstand 



Verdict Is Yours 
lus t 

Ocn Mills tit 
suit 



Matinee 



ifc »' •• 



ueen for a Day 

sust lit 

(9/ 25 9) P A T 

Amer Home 

■It Corn Prod 



American 
Bandstand 



Brighter Day 
I PAG 

Secret Storm 
Amer Home Prod 



Jueen for a Day 

' alt 
Minn. Mining 
Miles alt 
itu. It) a) Al- Cult a r 



American 
Bandstand 



Brighter Day 
r.t.o 



Modern Romances 
Com Prod alt 
Sterling Drug 



Do You Trust 
Your Wife? 

(10 3 S) 
sust 



Edge of Night 
PAO 

Pillsbury 



Modern Romances 
Kraft 



Do You Trust 
Your Wife? 

Flr> 



sust 



Secret Storm 
.Amer Home PTod 



Queen for a Day 

BOS alt 

Oossard 



Amei 



M Plod 
Cam Prod 



All-Star Coif 

- 



tdge of Night p 

P*Q £-: 

-._.. ; Modern 

Sterling 



alt 
Vlrk Chem 



Romance! 
Drug alt 
Com Prod 



Miller 1' 



.,* »• itt 



No net service 



NCAA Football 
tlSMl) 

NCAA JootbAlJ 

Oveni Ford. ?-ji- 



Comedy Time 
Lerer 

sos 

alt sust 



Mickey Mouse 
Club tL 9 M) 

Woody 
Woodpecker 
10/3 S Kellogg 



Mickey Mouse 

Club 

(10 3 S> 

Iris Myers. Pills 

•it Gen Foods 



Come-tv Time 
Kraft 
Miles " 
• It Welch 



Mickey Mouse 
Club I 
The Buccaneers 

9 Kellogg. 



Mickey Mouse 
Club 

Gen ' 
alt sust 



Comedy Time 

Oen Foods lit 

- Mwitho 



No net service 



NCAA Football 

■ 



No net 



Football 
Scoreboard 

PgtB- — 



a.m., Monday-Friday, participating sponsorship; Sunday 
News Special, CBS. Sunday, 11-11:15 p.m.. sponsored bj 
Whitehall alt Carter Products; Today, NBC. 7:00-9:00 a.m.. 
Monday-Friday, participating; The Jimmy Dean Shnu\ CBS. 
7:00-7:45 a.m., Monday-Friday, participating: Captain 
Kangaroo, CBS, 8:00-8:45 a.m., Monday-Friday. 9:30- 
10:00 a.m., Saturday, participating: News, CBS. 7:45-8:00 

43 



a.m. and 8:45-9:00 a.m.. Monday-Friday. 

All times are Eastern Daylight. Participati -ors 

are not listed because in many case- the\ fluctuate. 

World Series, oi M>< . starts 12:45 pan. local t 
Schedule: 2-3 Ocl >bei, Nen \<>rl: 5-6-7 October, Milwau- 
kee; 9-10 Octol New "inrk. Note: Milwaukee goes ofl 
daylight time 2' 1 S itember, Nen V>rk on 27 October. 




78 markets snapped up in first 
six weeks! Coca-Cola in Atlanta! 
NBC 0-&-0 in Los Angeles! 
Dixie Beer! Bowman Biscuit! 
Prescription 1500 in 10 markets! 
J. Carrol Naish, the NEW 
Charlie Chan, "the best ever 
to do the role." See it today, 
and you'll have to agree the 
new CHARLIE CHAN sells! 




Hurry! Marketsare 
being reserved 
today! Wire or 
phone for private 
screening! 



Television Programs of America, Inc. 
488 Madison Ave., N. Y. 22 • PLaza 5-2100 



BURGERMEISTER 
i Continued from page 33 j 

he illustrated by a single day, 9 Octo- 
ber 1955, known as Burgie's "Wild 
Sunda) : 

"The Rams were playing in De- 
troit." he recalls, "and the 49ers were 
playing the Bears in Chicago. Each 
club wanted its game televised to the 
home fans, and both games started at 
the same time. The games were being 
released over the ABCTV western net- 
work. In addition, the 49er-Bear game 
was being released nationally by ABC 
as their game of the week. 

*' Y\ e resolved this problem by using 
the ABC national picture only on the 
Chicago game and purchased separate 
telephone lines for a separate audio 
origination by our own sportscaster. 
The shared picture on the network 
contract lines and our separate audio 
were linked up at the Western network 
feed point in Los Angeles for release 
everywhere in the West except Los 
Angeles. 

"The Detroit game was originated 
by Vi JBK-Detroit and fed back simul- 
taneously by separate cable and re- 
leased in Los Angeles onlv over 
KABC-TV. 

"Commercials were inserted in the 
two separate games at KABC-TV in 
Los Angeles, and fed into both games 
at the same time. You can imagine the 
complicated cue setups and split-sec- 
ond timing necessary to get the right 
commercials in the right spot at the 
right time." 

This year, however, Burgie does not 
plan to buy football. 

"We always maintained a separate 
budget for football, and each year 
weighed the advantages and disadvan- 
tages of using it," said Mullins. "This 
year, aside from the uneconomical as- 
pects of a regional sponsor buying a 
complicated national package, Burgie's 
new campaign is breaking — with 
emphasis on beer as a product to be 
enjoyed by both men and women. So 
a loss in sports programing isn't im- 
portant to our plans." 

The new tv look will include syndi- 
cated shows and participations. Bur- 
gie co-sponsors Silent Service in six 
markets: San Diego I KFSD-TV I . Sac- 
ramento (KCRA-TV), Boise (KI DO- 
TV). Reno (KOLO-TV). Redding 
! K\ IP-TV.. Phoenix I KUAR-TY i . 
They also co-sponsor Frontier Doctor 
in Eureka iKIEM-TV), Highway Pa- 
trol in Chico (KHSL-TV) and Sheriff 
of Cochise in Fresno iKJEO-TV). 



Based on rating studies, Rolle points 
out, these are among the top syndi- 
cated shows in the country and were 
selected on that basis. 

"There's a resurgence of interest in 
popular music." Mullins says, "and the 
top tunes are coming more and more 
from the country field. We recognized 
this long ago and purposely went after 
a country music show. Then, too, peo- 
ple move into Los Angeles at a great 
rate. Many of them miss this sort of 
music and are looking for it." 

Rolle and Mullins found the right 
package this year in Country America, 
a local live music program KABC-TV, 
Los Angeles, especially developed, 
working with client and agency. 

Mullins describes the show as an at- 
tempt to bring dignity to the country 
music field. Top country stars are 
flown in for guest shots, most unusual 
for a local show. Good distributor and 
dealer comment and a rise in ratings 
are encouraging factors, along with an 
award from Show Business magazine. 

Meanwhile, the timid soul of the 
April-August I.D.'s has found a voice. 
He made his re-appearance 1 Septem- 
ber in a new series of I.D.'s in which 
he attempts to deliver the Burgie pitch 
— ostensibly without success. 

Also about to make their appear- 
ance are the spots pegged to fall and 
winter pleasures — fireside, party, 
mountain lodge — rather than beach, 
outing, gardening. Three more are in 
production. Three to four are kept 
running at a time, looped so as not to 
bore the viewer — "the worst thing you 
can possibly do." Rolle says. 

Les Mullins and Lou Rolle consider 
themselves "marketers" rather than 
"advertisers" with this product. They 
work closely with Burgermeister man- 
agement on maintaining the various 
lifelines in the highly competitive west- 
ern beer market : point-of-sale units in 
taverns and stores, described by Mul- 
lins as Burgie's "life's blood." and 
dealer loyalty to the Burgie brand. 
i Non-advertised "price" brands are a 
continuing problem and threat in the 
western market. I 

"Beer is not sold by one force 
alone." Mullins points out, "but by do- 
ing everything right." 

Thus, aggressive marketing, pioneer 
radio and tv efforts, aggressive out- 
door are the major factors in reaching 
number two place in the western mar- 
ket, maintained by a spot saturation 
which gave Burgermeister the best 
month in its history. ^ 



II 



SPONSOR 



28 SEPTEMBER 1957 






Report* and naluntri news, trends, 
opinions foi film buyert and tellers 



FILM-SCOPE 



28 September i; v M ,, u N ,, u , 1M summarize i h«- (trio and cone <>i feature Mm* in two eas) phi 

Cwyrltht IB97 

SP0N80K PUBLICATIONS INO. | ) llcailtilul cnsl-per-t ho usa m I . bill 

2 1 Somewhal dubious continuity ami sponsor identification* 

Solutions -nine professional and some on the do-it-yourself level to trouble No. - were 

cropping up in the trade all over this week, The) have this in c mon: \ thematic 

grouping of the films. For example: 

IT THE PROFESSIONAL LEVEL: Wl'. MGM, Screen Gems and others now 
are wrapping up features by categories instead of selling them strict!) helter-skeltei as 
anthologies. Thus the Warner Package contains six groupings mystery-horror; adventure; 

drama; comcd\ ; western: and musical. 

AT TIIK STATION LE\KL: Broadcasters are beginning t" -"it the cans into neal 
continuit) slacks -usually by personalities. One such station is WBZ-TV, Boston, which 
has assembled 48 Bette Davis films for Fridaj nighl showings (coincidentall) the star lives 
iu the vicinit) and can appear as hostess). Others have Errol Flynn Theatres, etc. 

Does it work? 

KTTV, a veteran experimenter, Bays yes. Ii has tried two thematic groupings of 
the M(iM library a famil) group and a star group. The former (with Bucfa pictun 
Dr. Kildare, Maisie, \ml\ Hard) I not only stood up to still' competition but gol .1 
lull sponsorship from the Dr. Ross Pet Food Co. 

The star group- consisting of Wallace Beer) films is considered an audience and com- 
mercial success in the Sunday 6:30 spot. 



NBC-TV Films has a new Canadian representative — Fremantle of Canada, 

Ltd. The deal becomes effective on Tuesday. 

Fremantle will get Boots "n Saddles (nol yet released in Canada) in addition to the 
other NBC Films series. 

The season's first bi«i rated lest of the works — live fare, lilms. reruns, ami 
just about anything else you want to read into it came <>n lucsda\. 1!'. Septembi 
from 7:30-8:30 p.m. 

\s clocked by Trendex, it was a |»reti> close race figure-wise. 

\t the subjective level, though, Wagon Train Bcored a triumph: Man) in the trade 
hadn't figured it would show up so well as it did. Here is the Trendex tabulation: 

7:30 to 8 P.M. 

Disne) land Luc) Wagon Ti iin 

Rating 11.7 12.9 11.8 

Audience share 15.4 

8 to 8:30 P.M. 

Disneyland Big Record Wagon Train 

Rating 16.1 16.3 16.0 

Audience shave 10.7 31.] 

SPONSOR • 28 SEPTEMBER 1957 15 



FILM-SCOPE continued 



In the midsl dl the I . S. controversy over whether films are merchandised strong- 
ly enough, Motosahuro Tanahe of Japan, president of Tokyo Tanahe Pharmaceutical 
I ". breezed into New York with a walloping ease history. 

His firm — both a drug manufacturer and retailer — sponsored Jungle Jim in three cities 
I [okyo, Osaka, and I\ T ago)al and licked everything, including Superman. 

Promotion, Tanahe told Screen Gems, played a big role. His kit I in color! in- 
cluded: booklets with synopses of the episodes; posters in retail outlets: special wrap- 
ping paper advertising the show; posters on street cars; signs on truck panels; and 
cartoon-type fliers. Additionally, he used tie-in cartoon advertisements in newspapers 
and sports magazines. 

\llcr lliis warm-up. Tanahe will tr\ a similar pilch for his latest — Circus Boy. 



Producers of commercial and industrial films are turning to name cartoonists 
to stir up advertiser interest. 

Latest is Ronald Searle, creator of characters in Punch, who is working on a 
special Standard Oil industrial film to be telecast on the 13 October special over NBC. 



Alongside the upswing in mystery films (FILM-SCOPE, 14 September. page 50), an- 
other member of the same family is due for a lift — the supernatural mystery. 
Several deals this week highlight the trend in the so-called "horror" field: 

• Screen Gems will produce a tv series called Tales of Frankenstein, with Boris 
KarlofE as host. 

• Hammer Film Productions is readying a half-hour Baron Frankenstein pro- 
gram (this is the same company that made Curse of Frankenstein for Warner Bros.). 

Although horror stuff is as old as the theatre, tv broadcasters got their first real in- 
doctrination in it in March 1956. During the week of March 5 to 11, WOR had King 
Kong on its Million Dollar Movie theatre and got the almost unbelievable rating 
of 79.7. So now the rush is on. 

What makes a good horror program? Schwerin Research has poked into this and 
thinks that: 

1) Plots in which ordinary, likable people get fouled up in supernatural situations 
are best received. 

2 1 Phyehopathic characters don't go over very well. 

3 1 For maximum impact, the precise supernatural circumstances should thread 
through the plot from start to finish — not sprung as a final surprise. 

4) The supernatural elements should have some connection with reality — even if 
onl) the figments of someone's imagination. Yarns which turn out to be mere dreams or 
nightmares apparently strike the viewer as too weak or fraudulent. 



FLASHES FROM THE FILM FIELD: C. J. LaRoche dickering on barter deal with 
lime Merchants for Warner Foundations . . . BBD&O reported looking for a syndicated 
show — possibly for Foremost Dairies . . . B. Gerald Cantor. Robert I. Westheimcr. ami 
Jack VI. Ostrow named to the NT A board of directors . . . Screen Gem's Casey Jones 
scries has been sold to the American Dairy Association for alternate-week sponsorship in 
L8 markets . . . TPA's commercial department will operate strictly from the West Coast 
. . . ABC's 26 Men makes its N.Y. debut on WABC-TV sponsored by Brylcreem and 
\\ hile Owl Cigars. 

Screen Gems Ranch Party sold this week to Gulf States Utilities Corp. for five mar- 
kets: Houston and Beaumont, Texas; Lake Charles, Lafayette, and Baton Rouge. La. Agencj 
i- I aw in. W asej — R&R. Series now signed for total of 35 markets . . . TPA appoints Charles 
Goit and Russ Clancy national sales directors with equal responsibility between them. 

I<> SPONSOR • 2o SEPTEMBER 1957 









SATURATION 

I ontinued // om page 30 > 

saturati n one station, the audi- 

i ional impat i on the niai kei i- fai be- 
|..u the f ■ t — i 10. I See chart pg. 29). 

"Since radio has become fashion- 
able' again and with clients clamoring 
for Bpace on the bandwagon, one 
.■'.•nil \ r\n iii i\ e told sponsor "an) 
advertiser who schedules as few as five 
- 1 1< >t - a week is bound !>> gel l"-t in tin- 
-Imllle. I In' onlj thine ili.il could pos- 
-iliK -a\ e liim is exi eptional i"[>\ and 
the highest-rated spots. 

" I he interpretation ol the word sat- 
uration has changed," maintains Nor- 
man Prouty, head "I radio For Rat/. 
It used to be 20 oi 30 spots pei mar- 
ket per week : now ii - often fai more 
I luui that." 

\\ hat research is behind tin- desire 
to saturate? In < Ictober, 1956 tin- \. 
C. Nielsen ('". iliil a survey for Radio 
Advertising Bureau mi adding in an- 
nouncements in 2<> running mi two 
radio stations (one net affiliate, one in- 
dependent I in a single market. I he 
announcements were aired Sunda) 
through Saturda) for a week from " 
a.m. to 1 I :30 |>. in. 

Here were the results: \\ iili 20 
spots, l''.J!', nf the market's families 
were reached willi average messages 



pei famil) "I 2. 1. Bui bj a. I. In. In 
spots I- Li in ■ the total to 10 !6.2' I 
oi tin- inai kit - families were rea< hed 
u itli 2.6 a\ erage messages pei famil\ . 
Mm- tin- additional Hi announcements 

nlr it possible I" H -a' Ii 12' i I ■ 

different families. 

( ttli. i L9 >'' studies bj Nielsen foi 
It Mi mi the cumulath e effe< t ol radi 
1 and ii is radio - accumulal ion powei 
thai has made satural ion the ke\ tac- 
tic i show : i I i ( ine -|">i -i heduled 
i \ ei \ lull houj will H.ii h Id' I .il the 
radio homes weeklj I 3 times; 
200 announcements per week on three 
stations reach 53.3' i "I the homes 6.9 
times and in four weeks reach 7 1'. 
homes 19.7 times; i 3 I 25 annou 
ments weekl) on a single stal ion 1 1 
25.7| < homes 2.5 times in one m i i 
and 19.3' i homes 5.5 times in Four. 
Resides an increase in I requenc) . 
saturation toda) is also marked, in 
mam cases, l>\ longer-term Inn -. < !old 
n medies, for example, are now re- 
ported tn be upping their buys from 
I! week- to 26. I li<' reasons for longer 
bu) - are nli\ ious the) hold I ime po- 
sitions againsl competition, and it is 
sometimes easier to gel clearances. 
Flic ■ frequenc) and duration ol sat- 
uration campaigns have been dis- 
cussed. I'iiiI what nf the various t\|>e- 



ituration? Paul Weeks 

of a nil" foi II I! Repn tml [ 
outlines these i ai ial ions I Satui 

■ ne station from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. 
d.n kel i"-i uli nit n- an i 

looked i : |2) Saturate i"j' twi 
three Btations; (3j Circulai - itura- 
lion : ai all houi - around the < lock on 
several stations; (4) Vertical satura 
limi: deliberate use "i jus) one "spe- 

■ ialt) station to reai Ii a -mall but 
< lass Begmenl of the market ; 
Horizontal - ituration : all the Btations 
around a market. 

Bo in '■ i uli" i- • < onon it il satu 
timi i- pli the < Mini. I!. ■ mse ii 

\i filling Iii- time slots, it pie ises the 
-i tionman. Bui what "f the radio 
listener. Men are a psychologist's 
\ iews mi thai Bcore: 

"Saturation is a double 
sword, -a\ - Vlbei i Shepai 'I ex< 
tive \ ice president ol the Institute Im 

Motivational Ii • h. "\\ hen -kill- 

full) used, ii < an i reate whal amounts 
i" a substitute for word-of-mouth 
port l"i a product. 

""I he "iliri aide "I the sword is thai 
a poorl; exei uted saturation i ampaign 
ma) hammei a selling slogan so bla- 
tantl) that ii drives the consume] from 
initial perception t" selective inatten- 
tion, iinalK I" actual annoi am ^ 



uhfV (like we knew it would) 

1ATES GOOD/ 

UNIQUE TEST PROVES 

1. WSUN-TV, only UHF in 3 station market, has large, loyal, audience. 

2. Advertising on WSUN-TV packs solid impact. 



Nl 



Lowest Cost Per Thousand 

WSUN-TV 
38 



WSUN-TV TAKES TOP RATING 

In Challenge of MGM Premiere on VHF Station 



Che 



Undupllcoted ABC in the 
Tompo-St. Petersburg Market 

Rtprticntcd b- VISARD. RIN- 
1 oil i< MCCONNELL, INC 
Southcjsurn J AMI S AYRES 



Four days before competing VHF station's MGM 
premiere, WSUN-TV decided to chollcnge Leo and 
VHF. Competing station wos concluding a month- 
long promotion campaign for MGM premiere. 

This was lorgest television promotion blast ever 
launched in Tompo St. Petersburg area. VHF sta- 
tion saturated with newspapers, radio, on-theair 
promos, outdoor displays, MGM parades 

WSUN-TV's decision was to challenge with 
"African Queen" from United Artists package . . . 
and restrict promotion to its own television facil- 
ities — announcements only, not one cent in ad- 
verising, ond only four days to promote. 



WSUN-TV's purpose wos to dramatically test 
pulling power of Channel 38 pitted against an all 
media compoign — a most severe test in view of 
one month of MGM promotion compared to only 
four doys of stotion promos by WSUN-TV. 

August 24, 10:30 PM, WSUN-TV played "Afncon 
Queen" head on cgainst "Command Decision" on 
Station B Result WSUN TV top rafmg omong 
all three stations in ARB Coincidental Survey. 

Il detail, 10:30-11:00 PM ratings were: 

* I TV leod-in from "My Hero"l 16.4 

Station B lead-In from "Grand Ole Opry"i _16 
Station C leod-in from "Burns & Allen" i 13.4 



SPONSOR 



28 SEPTEMBER 195' 



IT 



WTVT "shoots'the atom for 



« 




A special distinguished service award... for an 

"outstanding contribution in the fight to 

conquer cancer"... has been conferred on WTVT 

by The American Cancer Society 

for the station's 30-minute 

documentary film, "Search. 

A powerful story of the never-ending 

search for a cancer cure, "Search" is 

one of the most ambitious public 

service programs ever produced in 

Florida. WTVT cameramen 

for example, filmed "hot 

radioactive isotopes at Oak Ridge; 

while producing the picture 

This is another example of how 

WTVT's meaningful communin 

service builds loyaln 

and acceptance for you 




TAMPA-ST* PETERSBURG ranks 34th m retail sales amongmetropolitan markets*, is a must on every moder 
market list! WTVT dominates the Twin Cities of the South, delivers bonus coverage of 239 prospering communities 

* Sales Management Survey of Buying Power, May 1957 



i;: 



SPONSOR • 28 SEPTEMBER 1957 



vard-winning cancer film! 




3 OF TOP 25 SHOWS 
IN WTVT* 

according to new Pulse! And the top 

paulti-wcckly shows are on WTVT, 6 

p 7 p.m.! ARI3 proved it in February... 

ulse proves it now: WTVT is your top 

jy in the Twin Cities of the South! 

*Puhe, June, 1957 



+ 



UMPA- ST. PETERSBURG 
I0W 10th IN RETAIL SALES 
IER CAPITA 



U.S. Department of Commerce) 



1957 



1956 



o Retail 
o 

o Store 
a. 

ttmotive 

o. 

feral 

./hhandise 
«; 



ranking 


ranking 


34 


36 


39 


44 


29 


34 


33 


37 



Amount 
$786,145,000 

161,983,000 

147,698,000 

114,546,000 



(Soles Management Survey of luying Power, May 19S7) 




News - from scene to screen in 30 minutes, 

with WTVT's modern transistor sound-on- 
film equipment plus 37 cameramen -corres- 
pondents throughout Florida. Super-swift 
coverage makes WTVT news highest- 
rated in the market' 



CBS Channel 13 



WTVT 



The WKY Television System, Inc. 

WKY-TV and WKY Oklohoma City 

WSFA-TV Montgomery 

REPRESENTED BY THE KATZ AGENCY 



SPONSOR • 28 SEPTEMBER 1957 






l> 



SPONSOR ASKS 



How do you write a jingle 1957 style 




Therese M. Macri, copywriter, Batten, 

Barton, Durstine X- Osborn, \<i< York 
\\ hat puts that tingle in a jingle? 
Why does one patter ol words set to 
music start thousands of cash registers 
a- jingling — while another registers 
nothing hut apathx ? 

The answer may disappoint you. It 
rests in that tired 'n true cliche — crea- 




\ I 



"maybe even 
a talking 
dog 



five ingenuity. That spark may come 
from the words, the music, a combina- 
tion of both, or a completely new pres- 
entation — such as unveiling the first 
parrot ever to sing a commercial an- 
nouncement! I don't think it's been" 
tried yet — but dont rule it out. And 
after that, maybe even a talking dog to 
deliver your message! The point is: 
let the mind wander — stray — leap! 
Never be bound In the iron hand ol 
the conventional in any area of your 
conception. 

I he actual steps in the making of a 
jingle are similar to building any other 
creature of advertising: 

1 . Sift hundreds of approaches to 
ferret out the hook — the "nut" — the 
elusive conclusive selling point. 

2. Translate this "nut" ingeniouslx 
. . . (the toughest nut to crack!) 

3. Concentrate on just one poinl 
wherever possible. 

4. Keep the name of your product 
in the fore. It's surprising how often 
this is violated! The beginning of a 
jingle is a good spot — so is the end. 
I Frequently what comes last is remem- 
bered first — also much middle-singing 
tends to '"blur" out of hearing, i 

5. There is no rule as to whether 
the music should be adopted or orig- 



inal. However, in using a familiar 
tune, beware of dangerous association* 
with the original lyrics. (For instance, 
I'd avoid using (Gilbert and Sullivan's 
" I it Willow" for a brassiere compam 
— or "Mary Ann'" to sell a trip to the 
Rockies!) 

6. Repeat and repeat and repeat 
and repeat. By the time you, your 
agency, and } our client have just about 
"had it ... your consumer will begin 
to get it. 

And don I consider yourself "An 
Enemy of the People" for being father 
to the jingle. They can be fun, spright- 
ly, entertaining — as well as powerful. 
Don't you ever get a lift from mum- 
bling "Pepsi Cola hits the spot . . ."? 

I do! 

Shirley Polykoff Halperin, copy group 
sii[irrvisor, Foote, Cone & Belding, New York 

How to write a jingle in 1957? It's not 
very different really from what it ever 
was, except of course, that today 
there's more competition for the lis- 
teners' attention than ever before. To 
be successful these days — and this 
means to be memorable — a jingle must 
be more catchy in words, tune or both. 
To make any kind of an impression, 
it must have something a little extra in 
itself besides extra money behind it. 
Despite competition, however, a good 
jingle is one of the quickest, easiest 
ways to put over a sales message so I 
vuess jingles are here to sta\. 

What makes jingle-writing at all dif- 
ferent in 1957 is that many writers are 
following current musical trends, i.e. 
calypso, progressive jazz, rock and 
roll. Secondly, most of the jingles are 
fresh tunes rather than old music in 
the public domain. Today, the big 
money can hire some of our greatest 
song writers . . . but don't let this dis- 
courage you. Quite a few of the out- 
standing jingle hits running were writ- 
ten b\ ... well, let's call them ama- 



teurs since thej don't get paid extra 
for the song. 

What comes first, the tune or the 
phrase? That's a little like the egg-or- 
the-chicken question but as a copy- 
writer, I naturalK search first for the 
actual words to be used. After the 
words have been approved. I find that 
when I repeat the main phrase over 
and over again to myself, it 1 e»ins to 
beat out its own rhythm. And the 
rhythm, I think. plaxs a big part in 
determining the mood and tvpe of tune 
that will follow. A word of caution 
here: The best wax to destro) a night's 
sleep is a repeat the words anvwhere 
near bedtime. 

Does one have to know music? \ut 
necessarily, though it helps. The bead 
of our t\ department is a musician 
while another verv successful writer of 
jingles in the same department can't 
read music at all. He keeps the keys 
of the office piano taped with note- 
marked adhesive. One copywriter 1 
know works with numbers from one to 
eight to indicate the notes of the scale. 
I happen to be able to plav the piano. 
However, if one can train oneself on 
the numbers, a jingle can be worked 
out in the office. There's no better x\a\ 
to sow discord in the home than to 



\ 



Afc 



"he keeps 
the piano 
leys taped" 



subject the familx to too much "which 
wax do vou like it better . . . like this 
. . . la-da-da-da deee? . . . or like this 
. . . la-da-da-da-dooo."' 

Of course, arrangements, vocal and 
orchestral, are almost always done by 
a professional arranger. 



50 



SPONSOR 



28 SEPTEMBER 1 ( ^T . 




Jack Fox: Jingle consultant foi several 

ii^nt, ies 
\ good jingle, 1957 style, isn't <n 
shouldn't be anj different than a dur- 
able 1947 model, <>i a futuramic 1967 
model, In mj opinion, .i good jingle 

then, now, and tomorrow has .i 
message as simple as possible, as short 
.i- possible. I In- more <-• >] >\ points that 
are squeezed into ii the less impact ii 
has as a unit. Ii doesn't bbj too much, 
ami ii doesn i take I"" long t" -.i\ it. 

\ g I jingle [i"ini- out onl) the 

most important advantages the product 
boasts, Inn does so graphically. It is 



"/on much 

fudge cake' 



never what perplexed singers call a 
"mouthful," isn't clums) to sing, or 
difficult to gel across clearly. Even 
those who have never heard <>l the 
product, and who know nothing what- 
soever «»f its virtues, should be able 
t<- understand what the) hear the first 

time the) hear it. It follow- naliiralK 
that the name of the product should 
be positioned hoili lyrically and me- 
lodicalh) where it will sing out "loud 
and clear" even though it's said soft 
and low, 

["he melod] should be soundh con- 
structed, nice to listen it whether the 
tempo is bright or leisurely. If either 
the words or the music can be made 
more memorable b) "garnishing" 
\ ia sounds or arrangement garnish 
away, providing, of course, you don't 
distort or dilute the storj you're tell- 
ing. I here s nothing undignified or 
tawdr) about a '■gimmick'' it it catches 
the ear. captures the fancj . . . and 
sells the product! 

The danger in this technique is that 
it often gets aua\ from its enthusias- 
tic creators and is overdone. Then. 
like too much fudge rake it ""ili-- 
agrees with a lot of people who sim- 
pl\ cannot digest all that ardent gusto 
in such prodigious dose-. I believe the 

besl one word description of a g 1 

jingle is "palatable." Funny, rule. 
pretty, rhythmic? ¥es, just so it's 
"palatable." That waj it'- selling 
good will along with the product. \ml 
good will is a mighty effective sales- 
man in itself. ^ 



• • 



JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI . 

ihe Souih's fasfesf growing TV Markei 



>D«tll i 



V 



<»?, <i* N .. . 



T "> 









AVERAGE 

FAMILY INCOME 

$573520 



High BUY-POWER in the fast-growing Jackson market! In 
come from expanding industry, oil. gas, cattle, cotton, timber 
and wholesale trade means a billion dollar market waiting 
for you. Only two TV stations reach this prime market — 
WJTV and WLBT 

Television Magazine Market Book 1957 

220,308 TV HOMES 

SERVED BY TWO GREAT STATIONS 



WJTV 

CHANNEL 12 



KATZ 



WLBT 

CHANNEL 3 



HOLLI NGBER Y 



" 





SPONSOR 



28 SEPTEMBER 1957 



51 



STATION 
OWNERS 
ONLY 

I 

IflANACEMENT oppor- 
tunity desired. Area must 
have good potential. Inter- 
ested only in station where 
ownership is available based 
upon results obtained. 

13 years background in all 
phases of broadcast business 
with majority of experience 
in sales, sales management 
and station operation. 

Now employed and need 
minimum of $13,000 plus 
opportunity to increase. 

Reference and resume avail- 
able upon request. Direct all 
inquiries to 

B0X2A 

SPONSOR 
MAGAZINE 



52 



National and regional spot buys 
in work now or recently completed 



I SPOT BUYS 



TV BUYS 

The Norwich Pharmacal Co., Raritan. N. J., is using major 
markets for its Pepto-Bismol. The six week schedule will start in 
Octo] er. I he advertiser is seeking late night minutes and prime time 
chainbreaks; average frequency: 3-4 announcements per week per 
market. Buyer: Helen Kowalski. Agenc\ : Benton \ Bowles, \. Y. 

The Procter & Gamble Co., Cincinnati, is entering Southern mar- 
kets to promote its Duz. October schedule will run for an indefinite 
period. Minute announcements will be slotted during daytime 
hours; f requeue) will depend upon the market. Buyer: Bob Liddell. 
Agency: Compton Adv., Inc., New York. (Agency declined comment.) 

Grocery Store Products Co., West Chester, Pa., is going into ma- 
jor markets to push its groceries. Schedule begins in October for 10 
weeks. Minute announcements will be placed during nighttime seg- 
ments, with a women's audience in mind: frequency will vary from 
market to market. Buying is not completed. Buyer: C. Valentine. 
Agency: Ted Bates & Co., New York. (Agency declined to comment. 

National Biscuit Co., New York, is spotting the 30-minute adven- 
ture series Sky King in 110 markets to advertise its sweet goods line. 
The October schedule will run for 39 weeks. The 6:00 to 6:30 p.m. 
segment during the week, or Saturdav morning, is preferred. Bu\er: 
Sal Agovino. Agency: McCann-Erickson. New York. 

Lever Bros. Co., Food Division, New York, is initiating a campaign 
both in major and minor markets for its Lucky Whip. Schedule 
kicks-off in October for an indefinite period. Minute and 20-second 
announcements will be slotted both daytime and nighttime through- 
out the week; frequency will depend upon the market. Buying is not 
completed. Buyer: Jules Fine. Agency: Ogilvy. Benson & Mather. 
New York. I Agencv declined to comment. I 



RADIO BUYS 

Gold Medal Candy Corp., Brooklvn. is preparing a campaign in 
major Eastern and Mid-Atlantic markets. Schedule starts in Octo- 
ber for at least 13 weeks — possibly 26. Newscasts and da\ time min- 
utes are sought. Buyer: Joyce Peters. Agency: Emil Mogul Co.. 
New York. 



RADIO AND TV BUYS 

Chesebrough-Pond's, Inc., New York, is going into about 45 radio 
markets and about 30 television markets for its Pertussin. The 
schedule begins in October for 26 weeks. In radio, daytime minute- 
will be used: in t\. minutes will be slotted during Class "C" hours. 
Buyer: Ja\ Schoenfeld. Agency: McCann-Erickson, \ew York. 



SPONSOR 



28 SEPTEMBER 1951 




Atomic power in Caesar's day? 



Certainly! 

It was there, in the ground, in the air and water. It 
always had been. There are no more "raw materials" 
today than there were when Rome ruled the world. 

The only thing new is knowledge . . . knowledge of how 
to get at and rearrange raw materials. Every invention 
of modern times was "available" to Rameses, Caesar, 
Charlemagne. 

In this sense, then, we have available today in existing 
raw materials the inventions that can make our lives 
longer, happier, and inconceivably easier. We need only 
knowledge to bring them into reality. 

Could there possibly be a better argument for the 
strengthening of our sources of knowledge our colleges 
and universities? Can we possibly deny that the welfare. 
progress indeed the very fate— of our nation depends 
on the quality of knowledge generated and transmitted 
by these institutions of higher learning? 

It is almost unbelievable that a society such as ours, 
which has profited so vastly from an accelerated accumu- 
lation of knowledge, should allow anything to threaten 
the wellsprings of our learning. 



Yet this is the case 

The crisis that confronts our colleges today threatens 
to weaken seriously their ability to produce the kind of 
graduates who can assimilate and tarry forward our 
rich heritage of learning. 

The crisis is composed i al elements: a salary 

scale that is driving away from teaching the kind of 
mind most qualified to teach; overcrowded classrooms; 
and a mounting pressure for enrollment that will double 
by 19(57. 

In a very real sense our personal and national prog • 
depend.- en our colleges. They must have our aid. 

Help the colleges "I' universities of your choice. Help 
them plan for stronger faculties and expansion. The 
returns will be greater than you think. 



If you want to know what the college 
crisis means to you, write for a free book- 
let to: HIGHER EDUCATION, Box 36, 
Times Square Station, New York 36, 
New York. 



HIGHER EDUCATION 




KEEP IT B 




Sponsored as a public service, in cooperation with the Council for Financia' rtion 



SPONSOR 



28 SEPTEMBER I'd, 



53 



you need #J 
in any market... 





look at 



em in 
TULSA! 



Take a billion one dollar bills and 
scatter them over northeastern Okla- 
homa . . . makes a pretty picture, doesn't 
it? And it's more than just a pretty 
mental picture — it's a hard, concrete 
fact. Yes, there's a billion dollar market 
out there for you to tap . . . through 
KVOO-TV, CHANNEL 2. Tulsa, 
Oklahoma's No. 1 market sits in the 
very heart of this fertile dollar area. 
Think of it . . . the "wampum" of north- 
eastern Oklahoma plus the productive 
coverage of KVOO-TV. Man, there's 
a combination that's good for you! 




For Current Availabilities 

Contact Any Office of 
Blair Television Associates 




News and Idea 
WRAP-UP 



■ i 



ADVERTISERS 

Bell & Howell has informed 
SPONSOR that it is returning to 
tv after an absenee of eight years. 

'I he motion picture equipment pro- 
ducers are starting an eight week 
schedule in 12 major markets this 
month to introduce a new 8mm elec- 
tric eye movie camera. 

Total outla) for the ad campaign, 
which the firm says is one of the 
heaviest they've ever used, will be 
s !.")().()()l> u ill about one-third going 
to tv. 

Cities to be covered by the new fall 
schedule are: New York, Chicago, 
Los Angeles. Philadelphia. Boston. De- 
troit, Cleveland, San Francisco, Pitts- 
burgh, Washington D. C, St. Louis 
and Dallas. 

McCann-Erickson, Chicago, is the 
agencj . 

National Presto Industries, which 
is spending around $500,000 to 
promote their Control Master ap- 
pliances for the Christmas trade, 
i*. adding a somewhat novel twist 
to open dealerships via tv. 

A 12-minute film I made by Fred A. 
\ilc-~ Productions! is being distrib- 
uted to 75 tv stations to supplement 
the national air campaign. Presto is 
also buying 60-second announcements 
following the film, half of the time 
for Presto sell and half for local dealer 
identification. 

After the Christmas push, the film 
will be circulated among 125 tv sta- 
tions between January and October 
of 1958. 

Donabue & Coe is the agency. 

A. C. Allyn & Co., Chicago head- 
quartered investment firm, ha9 
found local radio so successful 
that it is extending its daily five- 
minute Stork Market and Busi- 
ness News broadcasts to other mid- 
west markets. 

Starting 1 October \ll\n is adding 
stations on Omaha. Kansas Citv. 
\\ aterloo. la.. South Bend. Madison. 
Davenport, la., and Peoria. 



J. R. Pershall Co., Chicago, is the 
agenc) . 

Lewvt Corp. is going into net- 
work radio for the first time in its 
history with participations on 
ABVs Breakfast Club. 

Over half of the automatic clean- 
er's $4 million ad budget will be used 
for the fall-winter campaign in air 
and print media. 

Promotion tie-in will be a Don Mc- 
Neill Rainhat, which will be used as a 
traffic builder for dealers. The \in\l 
hats will be offered free on the Break- 
fast Club to women who , ir-it a store 
to see a demonstration of the cleaner. 

The upholstery leather industry, 
previously a print media user 
only, is testing its first radio ad 
campaign this month in Detroit. 

Campaign will last 13 weeks and 
will use 42 minute announcement- a 
week on WJR, WWJ and WXYZ dur- 
ing early morning and late afternoon. 
The Upholstery Leather Group's execu- 
tive v.p., Paul R. Copeland. Jr.. sa\> 
timing is to reach the drive-to-work 
car radio audience. 

With Stuart Peabody's retirement 
on 31 December now official, here 
is the new Borden Co. advertis- 
ing department set-up: 

Milton Fairman becomes an assist- 
ant vice president with executive re- 
sponsibility for advertising and public 
relations. Fairman has been director 
of public relations since 1943. 

\ v illiam B. Campbell becomes direc- 
tor of advertising. Campbell has been 
manager of the general advertising 
department. 

Both promotions arc effective 1 
October. 

AGENCIES 

BBDO and Revlon are parting, 
effective 31 December. 

The agenc) has handled about half 
of the cosmetic firm's $16 million a 
year ad expenditures. 

The major share of the Revlon 



SPONSOR • 28 SEPTEMBER 1957 



i usiness cut rentl) .it BBDO i- due to 
^u in \\ .11 w iik & Leglei including the 
t w < > network quizzes $64,000 Ques- 
tion .in.l $64,000 ( hallenge i both on 
CBS l\ i. 

C. J. 1 aRoche m ill handle the new 
II til/n II inchell File which i- due i" 
-i. hi on \l>< I \ mi 2 October. 

Othei agencies cutting up the pie 
include: I mil Mogul and Dowd, Red- 
field & Johnstone. 

\»->\ agencj appointments: Ted 
Bates foi N UHSCO's I needn fnstani 
Fizz Drink ... J. J. Werner X As- 
sociates, San Francisco, for Paul 
Masson Vineyards. Geyer will con- 
tinue li> handle the \ru "» oik Cit) t\ 
campaign. 

Random notes: II. It. Humphrey, 

\ll<-\ & Richards has jusl come out 
v iih a new book, "' \n Introduction 
in Commercial Television Vdvertis- 
ing. Designed for advertisers new 
i' the medium i and im >i the old-pro 
network sponsor), the book consists 
ol 50 pages ol factual material, charts 
and maps . . . Stanley B. Weiner. 
Formerl} executive vice president of 
the Martin L. Smith Co. has resigned 
to form his nun agency, the <>. T. 
Stanlej (".<>. 

Foeus on personalities: Jim Fish 
has joined Vllen & Mar-hall. Los \n- 
geles, as an account executive. Fish 
comes from Don Otis Advertising . . . 
Everett L. Thompson, director of 
radio and television at Baldwin, Bow- 
ers & Strachan (Buffalo division of 
The Kumrill Co. I, has been named di- 
rector ol radio and tele\ ision for the 
entire Rumrill organization . . . John 
Koch has joined the Maercklein Agen- 
cy, Milwaukee, as an account execu- 
tive. Kneli comes from Roundy's, Inc., 
where he was assistant advertising 
manager . . . Wilbert H. Falstein, 
formerl} advertising and sales promo- 
tion manager for Gerber Plumbing 
Fixtures Corp., has joined Sidney 
Clayton & Associates, Chicago, as an 
account executive . . . Joe II. Lang- 
hammer has left D'Arcj in join 
Powell Advertising, Detroit, as vice 
president . . . Al Valentine ha- been 
named production manager for the 
Allman Co., Detroit. Valentine comes 
from \\ hippie & Black . . . Robert 
Johnson, formerly with G. M. Ha- 
loid & Co.. and William Stockclale. 

formerl) at K&E, have joined Grant, 
New York, as account executives . . . 
Cliff Rodders, president of Magnus 



Music Publishing and formei program Hen • the run down on pr< 

directoi ai Wllkk. Akron, has been types the cat manufacturers 

made an account executive al lessop Bigned foi to dat< 
Advertising, Akron , , . Robert I Drama I 

Johnson has been promoted to d Mysterj I 

toi ol the radio-t\ creative depart Quiz I 

ment at D'Arcv, St. I ouis. Sit < om. I 



li.i\ ■ 



NETWORKS 



Spei ials 

\ ii 

\\ estern 



The variet) formal baa turned <>ui \,i, See Detroit Hound up 

to be the favorite with aniomo- i M next issue, 5 Octobei foi cor 

lives (Chrysler, Ford ami General automotive ail media picture 

Motors) tor their bij: network l\ ^ 

splurge this season. Network t\ note-: American 



-lot \ 

iplete 



4 an 



FOR UNMATCHED COVERAGE OF 
STEUBENVILLE-WHEELING 



52nd TV Market 




OHIO/W. VA. 






HERE ARE THE FACTS: 



STATION —Covers 320,957 TV homes in 30 counties of Ohio and W. Virginia. 
62% more tower — 53,538 more TV homes than the Wheeling station. Lowest cost per 
thousand TV homes. Over 80 top-rated CBS and ABC Network shows. Total coverage of 
1,125,500 TV homes, including Pittsburgh. 

MARKET —Center of U.S. steel, coal and pottery industries. Fastest growing 
industrial area in the world. 1,418.800 population. More than $2 billion yearly pur- 
chasing power. Center of the Upper Ohio River Valley, rich in natural resources. 
Includes the highest paid industrial workers in the world. 

Ask for (1) Showing of new color slide film, "How to Make Money in the Steel Market." 
(2) Chart, "How to Measure Your TV Results." (3) "Directory of Retailers and Wholesalers in 
Steubenville-Wheeling Market." 

® WSTV-TV 

aSTEUBENVILLE, OHIO 
C J • T EL 9 -2 : 5}} W\TTS 
Represented by »iery-K.nodel. John I lam. Eie: VP and G*n'l Mgr. Rod 
Gibson. Natl Sis Mgr , 52 Vanderbilt A»e.. NYC. Murray Hill 3-6977 
Pittsburgh offl«. 211 SmithfUld St Grant I -3288 



* Member rt the Friendly 6r»u» 

WSTV. WSTVTV. Steubcnvillt: 

K0DE. KOOE-TV, J;: 

WB0Y. WBOYTV. Clarksburg 

WPAR. Parkersburg 

WPIT. Pittsburgh 



SPONSOR 



28 SEPTEMBER 1957 



55 



A pictorial review of local 
and national industry events 



PICTURE WRAP-UP 




Handicapped youngsters peer out of new station 
wagon paid for with $3,000-worth of Ohio sales ;ax 
-i imps collected by KYW, Cleveland, campaign. Disk 
jockej Wes Hopkins, who beaded drive, polishes car 




Creyhound gets a queen. Steverino, NBC-star grey- 
hound holds court for (1. to r. I John Knneau, v. p. 
Crey; A. N. Brion. president. Eastern Greyhound Lines 
ami Basil Kathhiine. who is handling the introductions 



Reading the fine print. JayZee Starbright, "the 
symbol of WJZ-TY, Baltimore," signs long-term con- 
tract. JayZee made her debut in connection with the 
station's recent change of call letters and format 




WANTEO 
* <^ 

Si 

5,000 




"That's the Varmint!" When KBTV, Denver's Sheriff 
Scotty (Ed Scott) broke an arm while playing baseball 
he turned it to good advantage. Watch out for "Hooke\ 
Mills." who smokes, plays hookey and ambushes sheriffs 




"Big Cheese in Wisconsin." WEAU-T\ celebrates 

dedication of its new 1.000 foot tower and power 
increase to 310,000 watt-, with a "family-type" gath- 
ering of 40,000 friends at an old fashioned county-fair 



Quite a cracker! Mayor Maynard E. Sensenbrenner 
of Columbus, bites into the world's largest cracker, gift 
of the Streitman Biscuit Co. of Cincinnati. WTVN-TV, 
Columbus, hatched this idea for "Zesta Cracker Day" 




Co. will again use network t\ news 
shows tlii- year, Inii has switched i" 
i H> TV's Douglas Edwards show. 
( anco w ill take the alternate Fi ida) 
7: L5-7 :30 p.m. -\><\ starting I < >< tober. 
( anco's ad manager, F. G, Jewett, says 
the i\ program is pari "I long range 
plans t" point oul the \ ai ietj "I prod- 
ucts packaged in ii» containers and to 
make familiar the company s oval 
trademark . , . CBS TV's regional 
football games (going from 29 Sep- 
ii nil mi in 22 December) have signed 
up a total 01 12 different sponsors. 
Client- include: Marlboro, P. Ballan- 
tine ^\ Sons, National Brewing, I )u- 
quesne Brewing, American Oil, Goe- 
bel Brewing, Speedwa) Petroleum, 
Standard Oil I Indiana), Pabst, Fals- 
tall. American Petrofina ami Tan 
American I lil. 

Network radio notes: NBC Radio 
has added $1.5 million (net) in new 
and renewed business during the pasl 
two weeks from orders placed b) 1-' 
advertisers. Advertisers ordering full 
program sponsorships were: Dow 
Chemical (through MdcManus, John 
8 Adams) for Red Foley Show, new 
musical program starting 2 November 
(Saturda) 12:30-12:55 p.m. I and run- 



• 1 1 1 -_• t . 



Pontiai tin 





GEE j That's the 
car for me!" 

Commercials on WGN-T\ have 
a \\.i\ ol getting results because 
WGN-TV programming keeps 
fdlk- wide-awake, interested 
and watching. For proof, lei mir 
specialists fill you in on some ~ur- 
prising WGN-TV case histories 
and discuss \ our sales problems. 



Put "GEE!" in your Chicago sales 

with GN-T 



M.n Vlanus, John & Adams I foi the 
Xational Football League Champion- 
thip Game on Sunday, 29 December; 
Bell Telephone I through N. W. \ 
renewing The Telephone limn foi 19 
weeks stat ting 7 < Ictobei < VIonda . 
9-9:30 p.m.) . . . \lt\ has added con- 
tracts I rom 1 1 v » • sponsot - this week. 
Plough, In. .. w itli a 52-week i ontrai t 
for newscasts; Campana Sales * o. with 
one segment per week on the Break- 
fast ( tub ; II. J. Heinz t H. k itli 
n. cut- on Breakfast Club, Herb 
i hi ' indet son Shou . and the new 
Jim Reeves Show; Rusl Crafl Publish- 
ers with one segment "I Breakfast 
Club; ami Sleep-Eze < !o. h ith i wo 
ments of the Don McNeill starrei ... 
Benrus Watch Co. and P. Loril- 
lard have both scheduled satura- 
tion campaigns on Mutual. I he 

watch firm in a pre-Christmas push 

w ill take I ni i eight-second adjacencies 
to newscasts per week starting 21 Oc- 
tober and running through 22 Decem- 
ber. Lorillard initiate- a 21') five-min- 
ute newscast campaign running four 
anil a half week- in behalf of Kenl 

starting in September. 
Job notes: John II. \\ bite has been 
appointed sales manager of \P>\. 
\\ hite comes from Zh l\ . when- he 
was sport sales manager for programs 
in the central dh ision. 

ASSOCIATIONS 

BBfl has decided to suspend its 
program clinics for radio and t\ 
broadcasters for the year 1958. 

BMI feels that after 310 Clinic- ovei 
seven consecutive years it deserves a 
rest. 

The decision was made in -pit*- ol 
the fact that the 1957 Clinic attend- 



Channel 9 
Chicago 




f/.]f 



CHANNEL 4-SIGHT 




Yes ... be wise! When you L 

television in the great Golden 
Spread, use Channel 4 Sight. 

Over 100,000 TV sets 
Nearly $200,000,000 in Retail Sales 

Power: Visual 1C: I 

Aural 50 I 

Antenna Height 833' above 

the ground 




KGNC-TV 



CHANNEL 4 

AMARILLO, 

TEXAS 



"I just love those KRIZ Phoenix an 
nouncers." 



CONTACT 
ANY 

KATZ MAN 



SPONSOR • 28 SEPTEMBER 195. 



Oi 



TERRE HAUTE, 

Indiana's 2nd Largest 
TV Market 



/ 



251,970 
TV Homes 



BOLLING CO. 
NEW YORK 

CHICAGO 




MONTANANS 

. . . have money 
. . . spend money 
and they watch 

KMSO-TV 



\ 



/ 



by choice 



SELLING 

01 r\C\r\ Li. WESTERN 

191,000 watts MONTANA 

KMSO-tv *f '" 

Inc. 

TRANSMITTER 

100 MILE RADIUS 

ATOP 

TELEVISION reac hing the 

MOUNTAIN LARGEST 

ELEVATION set counf by 

7000 FT. actual survey 




MISSOULA, MONTANA 



ance at 45 different sessions has set 
a new record (5.7% higher than last 
year). 

Clinics will be resumed in 1959. 

Meetings : Indiana Broadcasters 
Association will hold its fall meeting 
i.t French Lick, Ind. on 25-26 October 
. . . Broadcasters' Promotion Associa- 
tion > second annual convention and 
seminar is set for 1-2 November at 
the Sheraton Hotel, Chicago . . . Illi- 
nois Broadcasters Association will 
hold its fall meeting at the Abraham 
Lincoln Hotel, Springfield, on 30 Sep- 
tember and 1 October . . . Radio Pio- 
neers will pla\ host to Jack Gould, 
radio-tv critic, at its fall luncheon 
meeting in New York on 22 October. 
RAB's third annual National Radio 
Advertising Clinic to be held at the 
Waldorf-Astoria. New York, on 8-9 
October will feature these speakers: 
Albert Brown, v.p. in charge of ad- 
vertising and public relations for Best 
Foods, New- York: Julian Barksdale, 
vice president in charge of marketing 
and planning. Stephen F. Whitman & 
Son and James J. Delaney, advertising 
manager of Sinclair Refining Co. 

The Advertising Federation of 
America has opened a second office 
in Washington, D. C. Head of the new 
office is William P. Tidwell. veteran 
capitol newsman. 

FILM 

Film row this week was active in 
both sales and new appointments. 

Ziv TV will set a record of six New 7 
\ ork premieres in one month. Two 
shows are bowing on the network and 
four on local N. Y. stations. 
The Ziv schedule of premieres : 
1 I Harbor Command, a double ex- 
posure, on WABC & WOR, sponsored 
by Miles Labs. 2 1 Harbormaster, 
CBS TV, sponsored by R. J. Reynolds. 
3 I West Point on ABC for Rise and 
Van Heusen. 4 1 Tombstone Territory 
on ABC. sponsored by Bristol-Myers. 
5) New Adventures of Martin kanr 
on WOR. 6 i The new Highway Patrol 
series, double exposure on WPIN and 
\\ l!(' \. with Ballantine as sponsor. 

To date 27 stations have signed for 
Screen Gems' Shock package for 
which an October premiere is planned. 

Ziv's Spanish language version of 

Harbor Command has been sold in 
\ ene/uela. Puerto Pico. Panama and 



Coming or Going 
KBTY is leader 
in DENVER TV 

Whether you are just moving into the Denver 
market, or already going "great guns" here, 
you need Channel 9 because KBTV is FIRST 
in Denver when and where it counts the most! 



T WT 




KBTV first* in quarter-hour 
leads (by more than one rating 
point), between sign-on** and 
10.00 p.m., Monday through Fri- 
day. 

KBTV leads* during the same 
time period in "share of audi- 
ence". 

KBTV occupies* 4 of the 5 
top spots in the cumulative rat- 
ings of 21 locally produced pro- 
grams. 




KBTV first in Denver for pro- 
motion, with solid, successful mer- 
chandising cooperation for its 
advertisers and, most important, 
SALES RESULTS! 

Call your P.W.G. Colonel today. 

Buy the station in the rich Denver 
market that delivers People and 
PURSES . . . Impacts and RE- 
SULTS! 



z 



•KBTV sign-on 10:30 a.m. 

"ARB Denver Survey 
-May, 1957 

■ Quarter-hour leads 

Percentage of audience 




Write, wire or Phone KBTV or Peters, Griffin, 



Woodward, Inc. 



KBTV 9 

DENVER, COLORADO 
JOHN C. MULLINS /?■ JOSEPH HEROLD 



President 



Station Manager 



,;; 



SPONSOR 



28 SEPTEMBER 1957 




your extra hand is 



SPONSOR 



A corps of the most capable 
editorial hands in the business 
work for you at SPONSOR to 
bring the latest broadcast 
developments within reach of 
your fingers — week after week 
— 52 weeks a year. 

SPONSOR is the nerve center 
of the industry. It's the magazine 

of ideas — of penetration — of 
every day USE — the most 
widely quoted publication in 
the field. 

It's the one book you ought to 
read — at home. It will give 
you more to think about and 
more directions in which to 
expand your thinking than any 
other trade journal you can buy. 

Now — for less than a penny 
a day — fust S3. 00 a year — 
you can have 52 issues of 
SPONSOR delivered to your 
home. Try it on this 
money back guarantee. 



SPONSOR 

40 East 49 St., New York 17, N. Y. 

I'll take a year's subscription of SPONSOR. 

You guarantee full refund any time I'm 

not satisfied. 

NAME 

FIRM 

ADDRESS 



Bill me 



Bill firm 



I '< i ii. I In- \ eu I'/i entun • ■/ Martin 

Kane u ill .il-.i In' Been in P i and 

I INI. I. 

Film Men in The News* Louie .). 

\iirrlio appointed ili\ ision mai 
.mil [Hurra) M. Kaplan named sales 
manage] of NTA Pictures .. , I nom- 
as II. Bates on proi loted \ .p. of the 
Yankee Division ol RKO [eh 
Pictures, Inc. . . . Lawrence II. M< - 
chant appointe I account execul i 
( BS i\ Mm -.il.- \\ illiara Gar- 

gan, Jr.. u ill head up the New \ 
sales office ol \ an Pi aag Pi oductions. 
effective I < Ictobei . . . \\ alter Kings- 
l«-\ name I genei a] sales 
/i\ - s) ndication <li\ ision . . . Daniel 
Grice appointed exei utive proi ti< er ol 
I antamount Pictures . . . Milton \. 
Gordon, president ol I I' \ and 
M;inn_\ Reiner, Foreign sales man- 
ager, u ho is < in rentl) on a trip sur- 
veying world i\ markets . . . VS tiding 
Picture Productions, Inc. has 
formed a new creative marketing serv- 
H i- depai tment, headed up b) Leon 
\. Kreger. 

RADIO STATIONS 

How to gel your station talked 
about — W \\ K. Louisville, used a 
wild promotional contest, a good 
public interest cause and sprin- 
kled it with a lot of Inn for every- 
one in this way. 

• ( lontesl for listeners to choose t li«- 
"Mosl Popular \\ \\ E Pei sonalirj " 
with the winner to receive the 
l>rize of a weekend .it Pewee Valle) 
(pop. 720), a nearb) communit) noted 
lur it» peace and quiet. He also would 
have the use of a 1 928 Rolls-Roj i e 
u hile there. 

• [he cause was Pewee \ allej - 
carnival to raise monej for the annual 
payment on their new fire truck bought 
for the Volunteei Fire Department last 
year. 

• Vdded window dressing was a 
l>eaut\ contest, theft of the ballot l>"\ 
.mil .1 parade of antique cars. 

\\ \\ I made five remote broa leasts 
from Pewee Valley, including two net- 
work feeds t" NbM - Monitor. 

Results — more than enough mone} 
tn |>a\ for the fire truck for the com- 
munit] and a solid month of talk- 
provoking promotional activities f"r 
the station. 

Newsworthy idea at work — to 
point up the -nperiority of radio 




S 




Now there's 
a detergent!" 

' A i . \ I \ 

\\ i ,\ I \ progi ammii 
Inlk- wide-awake, interest) 

and initi i ' ■ . I if, Irt mir 

spei i.:li-t- till Miii 111 mi some -ur- 
prising \\ ' A I \ i • -■ 
and 'Ii-' usa your sales probli • 



Clucajo 



Put "GEE!" in your Chicago sales 



Ahwto Us 7owert 




. l^t TT/fflON I I. MovfJ r m ei r-i sJiertiteri Int.' 



SPO.NsnR 



28 SEPTEMBER 195*3 






news coverage WJHB, Tallavega, 
Via. (a 17-day-old newcomer to 
the broadcast field), devoted one 
whole day last week to nothing but 
news. 

The all-news day, with, the heart) 
hacking of sponsors of musical and 
other spe< ial programs, kept three an- 
nouncers reading I P bulletins from 
a.m. sign on i<> the 5:45 p.m. 
sign off. 

Promotion idea from KOSI, Den- 
ver: Monthly sponsorship of a 
downtown shopping day. 

Here's the \\a\ it works: On the 
third Wednesdaj of each month the 
radio station will pay the bill for the 
downtown shopper's buses from 10 
a.m. td noon. In addition KOSI is 
gh ing free air time to plug the special 
\\ ednesda) s. 

Local merchants are cooperating 
with window displays and other media 
calling attention to "KOSI downtown 
shopper's da\-. 

Station sales: KOME. Tulsa, has been 
bought by John Kluge from John 
Brown I niversity. Sale price was esti- 
mated to be $175,000. Formerly using 



classical music and religious program- 
ing, new plans call for complete over- 
haul in personnel and switch to music- 
news-sports format. 

People in the news: Robert J. Hath 

has been upped to station manager for 
KAKC, Tulsa, and Bill Allred, ad 
executive, has joined the station's sales 
staff as an account executive . . . Roy 
L. Cordell, former station manager 
for KAKC, Tulsa, has transferred to 
KIO \. Des Moines, as station manager 
. . . Riek Drew has been appointed 
local sales representative for KCMO, 
Kansas City. Drew comes from KI* Rl . 
Columbia, Mo. . . . James W. Bel- 
cher, formerly with WWJ-AM&TV, 
Detroit, has joined KYW, Cleveland as 
head of the newly created radio pub- 
licity department . . . Robert Mo- 
ri insey has been named program 
manager of WBAL, Baltimore. Mc- 
Kinsey formerly was program director 
for WCCO, Minneapolis . . . Chuck 
Christianson, San Francisco man- 
ager for Adam Young, has been 
named general manager for KRUX, 
Phoenix . . . Don Metrovich has 
joined WGAR, Cleveland, as national 
sales representative. Metrovich comes 



WKRG-TV LEADS THREE WAYS 

No matter how you measure it 
in this Billion-Dollar Market. 



WKRG-TV is number one by a large margin 

>\ * e - y NX 



v 



NIELSEN 

Report number two shows WKRG-TV 
leading in every depf. . . . covering 
33 to 26 counties for Sta. "X", with 
45,000 extra homes in Ch. 5's area. 

A. R. B. 

(Feb. '57) WKRG-TV leads 281 to 
] 50 in measured quarter-hour seg- 
ments. At night, the leod is 1 39 to 59 ! 

PULSE V *•>/«, «ccA.** e ^ 

Telepulse (Sept., '561 shows WKRG- £/#*. ""55* m iA\® 

TV leading in 275 quarter-hours to '//#*«_ +• *• + llAU' 

171 for Station "X". *Wf|-$$$ W» w "' 

HERE'S THE BILLION-PLUS MARKET 

Within the area of WKRG-TV's measurable audience lies 1,258,000 
people . . 336,000 families . . Cons. Spendable Income, $1,467,000,000 
and Tot. Ret. Sales of $1,060,054,000 (latest published SRDS figures). 
Here is the Coverage-Bonus WKRG-TV gives you in Big, Billion-Dollar 
Mobile: 




WKRG-TV 
Station "X" 

WKRG-TV Bonus 



Population 
1,258,000 
1,087,000 

161,000 



Total 
Families 
336,000 
290,000 



C.S.I. 

$1,467,000,000 
1,316,000,000 



T.R.S. 

$1,060,000,000 
954,000,000 



46,000 $ 151,000,000 $ 106,000,000 



Channel 



wlcrg-tv 



AVERY- KNODEL 



from American Creeting Cards . . . 
Frederic L. Kareh, operations pro- 
gram manager for WCAl , Philadel- 
phia, has been upped to program di- 
rector . . . Diek Godfrey has been 
appointed a sales account executive at 
KCBS, San Francisco. He has been 
sports coordinator and newscaster . . . 
Alvin G. Flanagan will become the 
new general manager of KCOP, Los 
\ngcli-.. a> soon as the FCC approves 
the transfer of the station to the new 
management group made up of Ken- 
yon Brown. Bing Crosby, George L. 
Coleman and Joseph A. Thomas. The 
group recently bought KCOP for %\ 
million from Copley Press. 

Station sales: WWW, West War- 
\\ick, R. I., has been transferred to 
Grelin Broadcasting. Melvin C. Green, 
officer of Twin State Broadcasting, has 
resigned effective 27 September to as- 
sume new duties as president of Grelin 
. . . WRKE, Roanoke, has been sold 
to Sherwood J. Tarlow, Allan W. Rob- 
erts, Dr. Bertram W. Roberts and 
Joseph Kruger who are owners and 
operators of WARE, Ware. Mass. 
Purchase price was $7.5.000 . . . 
Transfer of KOXC, Sacramento 
Valley, Calif., from Jack 0. Gross to 
Rabell enterprises has been approved 
by the FCC. Call letters will be 
changed to KPAY and network affilia- 
tion will be dropped . . . KWG, Stock- 
ton, Calif, has been sold to Robin Hill. 
Bob Reichenbach and Frank Axelson 
for $85,000. 

TV STATIONS 

Here's the new set up in Trian- 
gle's administrative realignment: 

Ben B. Bavlor. Jr.. now station man- 
anager of WNHC-AM-FM-TY. Hart- 
ford-New Haven, is new to Triangle. 
Most recently Baylor was vice presi- 
dent and general manager of W IVT. 
Fort W a\ ne. 

Frank Palmer, now general man- 
ager of WFBG-AM&TV, Altoona- 
Johnstown, moves over from W LBR- 
TV, Lebanon-Lancaster. 

Joe Zimmerman, now general man- 
ager of W LBR-TY , Lebanon-Lancaster, 
moves up from director of station pro- 
motion for Triangle. 

Edward M. Scala, now director of 
sales development for WFIL-AM-FM- 
TV, Philadelphia, was general man- 
ager of WFBG-AM&TV, Altoona- 
Johnstown. 



(.ii 



SPONSOR 



28 SEPTEMBER 1957 



\\ J/-TN . Baltimore, Bends ilii* 
success storj about it-* acM I. air 
Shows 

\\ iili the |'i ogram on the aii just i 
leu weeks and onl) recentl) using the 
MGM library, the station has ahead) 
put "Hi the s l!<> signs. 

Rating increases and sponsor en- 
thusiasm iriln i the station's big pro- 
motion-programing-publicit) push l"i 
the big changeovei in ownership, pro- 
graming and call letters. 

Some "I the new \\ BC outlet - Btunts 
included balloon drops, a touring 
Thunderbird ami Model I to contrast 
the "hi and ncn mi Channel L3, ami 
distribution of a baker's dozen dough- 
nuts ai coffee break time in local ad 
agencies. Even mothers "I newl) bom 
babies were reminded of the station 
ever) lime the) reached l"i a fresh 
diaper, a- result (A a tie-in with Stork 
|)\ dtv \\ ash, 

\\ ol . Washington, D.C. lias ap- 
plied to the board of commission- 
ers of the District for permission 
to install a closed circuit wire tv 

• J -Inn. 

Plan- call I'm: (a) Feature film, 
Broadwa) plays, operas, concerts ami 
sports programing; (b) payment 1>\ 
month!) subscriber charge and (c) 
educational programing in coopera- 
tion with local schools. 

Thomas Tinsley lias announced 
the appointment of Simmons As- 
sociates a- representatives in Chicago, 
the midwest ami New England for 
stations \K XEX-TV, Richmond; \\ LEE, 
Richmond and \\ I 111. Baltimore. 
\\ \l A -I \ will he the first h station 
l" he handled l>\ the rep firm. 

Station notes: WPTA, New Fort 
Wayne, 1ml. . has signed a- a primar) 
affiliate of \HC I \ effective 21 Sep- 
tember . . . WWLP, Springfield, 
Mass., has withdrawn application for 
a satellite t\ >la(ii>n in Pittsfield, Mass., 
due to FCC announcement of elimina- 
tion of 1 HF channel- in the area. 

Personnel notes: J. S. "Dody" 
Sinclair has been promoted to sta- 
tion manager at WJAR-TV, Provi- 
dence . . . <ieor<:e Stantis. produc- 
tion manager of KFMB-T\ . San 
Diego, has been upped to program 
supervisor . . . Bill Horstman, pro- 
ducer-director at WKRC-TV, Cincin- 
nati. has been promoted to commer- 



Subject to FCC approval, announcement has been 
made <>l the acquisition l>\ [. 1) \\ Lulu i I < \.is and 
California industrialist, and fohn 1 Loeb ol Carl M. 
Loeb, Rhoades v Company, New York, ol all out 
standing stock in Muzak Corporation foi $4,350,000 

I In- sellers wen William Benton, Formei 1 . "> 
Senatoi from Connecticut, II E. Houghton, President 
<>l Muzak, and othei capable executives associated 
with them. 

We initiated this transaction am! worked unceas 
inely to its conclusion. 



ALLEN M\DEH AMI i:il\lPA.Vl 

Vegotiatort for the Purchase and Sole <>/ Dai/j Vcnnpopwj, 

Hiiiliii mill Television Properties 

Washington New York < hicago 

1625 Eye St.. \.\\ . 60 E. 12ml St. 35 E. W acker Drive 



SPONSOR • 28 SEPTEMBER 195^ 



61 




«r 



GEE! 



That's the 
coffee for me!" 

Commercial- mi WGN-TV have 
awa) of getting results- because 
WGN-TV programming keeps 
lnlk- wide-awake, interested — 
and watching. For proof, lei our 
specialists till you in on some sur- 
prising WGN-T\ case histories 
ami discuss \ our -ale- problems. 

Put "GEE!" in your Chicago sales 

...i+h #% Channel 9 

Wlin Ira Chicago 





Most Powerful Twins 

CJON-TV "is? 

Argcntia 



CJ(MV 




KcL^> 300.000 



' 'Captive Newfoundlander* 
and latest B B M &ltows , 
85% of all qrcater St. John's 
homes have TV $et$ 



weed i, co.u.S. 



STOVIN-CANAOA 



cial production manager . . . Doris 
Belcher, formerly with KCEN-TV, 
Waco, Tex., has joined KSBW-AVI& 
T\ a- assistant to the promotion man- 
ager . . . Baylen H. Smith, former 
production director, has been named 
program director and James Van de 
Velde, announcer, moved up to pro- 
duction director at WISX-TV, Mil- 
waukee . . . (Diaries !W. Neel has 
been appointed to the national sales 
department of WTVT, Tampa. Neel 
was director of advertising of the 
Daily Oklahoman and Oklahoma Cit) 
Times.. . . Arnold Starr has joined 
the sales stall of WRCA-T\ . Vw 
^ oik. He comes from WOR-TY. New 
"^ < > i k and i- replacing Pat Harring- 
ton, Jr., who has moved to NBC TV 
network sales . . . Del Greenwood 
has moved up to the -ales staff of 
KOA-TV. Denver . . . Diek Walker. 
formerK with KWTV, Oklahoma City, 
has been named sales service coordi- 
nator for KCMO-TV, Kansas City 
. . . Vincente Ramos, formerlv 
with TPA. has been named presi- 
dent of the Latin American Net- 
works Co., the U. S. and Canadian 
offices for CMBF Cadena Nacional 
of Cuba. The network is made up 
of seven stations . . . Karl Nelson, 
formerly with WICU-TV, Erie, Pa. 
has joined WTAR-TV, Norfolk, Va. 
on the sales staff . . . John T. Caudle 
has joined the promotion staff at 
WSOC-TV, Charlotte, N. C. 

CANADA 

Described as the first completely 
Canadian tv film, a country music 
show starring Jack Kingston and titled 
Main St. Jamboree is now rolling. 

The show is being produced by Mer- 
idian Films, which reported that this 
is the first time a film has been pro- 
duced by a Canadian company with an 
entirely Canadian cast and technical 
crew. 

In addition to Canada the show will 
be offered in the United States and 
Great Britain. Meridian reported that 
a major U. S. distributor will handle 
these series south of the border. 

Rock 'n' Roll is going over big in 
Canada, according to A. A. Mc- 
Dermott of Radio and Tv Sales. 
Inc. 

McDermott said, "everybod) is on 
the rock n' roll kick — well, practical!) 
everybody. Even the CBC stations are 
on the hand wasron." 



McDermott said one major market 
station had increased its audience 
-hare from \' < to 'MV i in about two 

months. "I hat was all the incentive 
needed for tlio-e who were hanging 
hack on the plan." he said. 

FINANCIAL 

Stock market quotations: Follow- 
ing stocks in air media and related 
fields are listed each issue with quota- 
tions for Tuesday this week and Tues- 
ila\ the week before. Quotations sup- 
plied by Merrill Lynch. Pierce. Fenner 
and Beane. 





Tues. 


Tues. 




Stock 


1 i Sept. 


_'l Sept. 


( hange 


\ in 


) ml. Stock 


Ext hange 




M'.-I'T 


IK'. 


L7% 




vm 


L71% 


169% 


-Is 


Vvco 


(>< 


6 




CBS "A" 


29 


28 


-1 


Columbia Pic 


IB', 


17% 


-1% 


Loew's 


16 • 


15% 


- % 


Paramount 


34 


33% 




RCA 


33% 


32' . 


-1% 


Storer 


23% 


22', 


-1% 


20th Fox 


21 :; , 


24% 




\\ arm r Bros. 


20% 


20% 


- '4 


\\ estinghouse 


'■;'. 


61% 


_2 


{merit an Stot /■ 


Exchange 




\llir! Vrtists 


3 


2% 


- % 


Vssoc. Wt. Prod. 9 


8% 


— 78 


< >>< v nper 


T s 


!;'. 


- At 


Dumont Lal>- 


1% 


t 7 . 


- 


(iuilil Films 


3% 


3 


- % 


\T\ 


; 7 - 


Vs 


-2 







Only ONE is atop the 

Continental Divide 

Serving both the Atlantic and 
Pacific Sides of America 



KXLF - TV4 



Montana 



East— The Walker Co. 

West — Pacific Northwest Broadcasters 



(.2 



SI'ONSOK 



2o SEPTEMBER 195' 



Wkatt fnif>j>rniriK in I 5 Government 

that iiffrtti tpOntOTt '. \t<ilitm< 



WASHINGTON WEEK 



28 SEPTEMBER \^ ||„. k«r-ri observers of the Washington what thei think are the implications 

C*»yrl|ht IM7 
SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INO. °' ••'«' FCC B \ole c » I" a I ll ree-\ cur trial for pay -t > .md Mill II .nine a \\ a \ With ill'-' 

Impressions] 

I i It i- n"t surprising thai there is a good deal <»| confusion about what the 
FCC meant even if both proponents and opponents "f pay-l ire claiming a touchdown, 
if nol a final \ ictory. 

2^ The situation becomes less confusing if it is realized thai the commission acted 
just as Chairman Doerfer wanted. It threw the pa\-t\ l);ill squarel) into 1 1 ■ » - lap 
of Congress, but exactl) in I li<* opposite manner in which th< anti pa 

gressmen and Senators would have liked. 

31 ITiese legislators wanted the FCC I" oil back and 'I" nothing about pay-h until 
Congress passed a bill on the subject. The FCC turned around and said, in effect, we are 
•roinjr to approve a trial unless you pass a hill to the contrary. 

I I The I»i Li kicker is the fact that it is difficult to gel a hill through Congn -- 
If the FCC did the waiting there would never be a trial "f pay-tv. \- it i-. the odds are 
strong that Congress will adjourn next year without taking anj affirmative ac- 
tion on the Bubject. 

51 Even though it will take a year before the FCC appi n) application for a 

trial pay-tv, it also means thai when the PCC goes ahead in earnest it will b<- able 
to say il gave Congress everj chance to express itself or stymie the test. 

The stains of the opposition to pay-tv on Capitol Hill can be Bummed up this w 

• Bills have been introduced in hnth chambers to make pay*U Qlegal. H t 1 
bills arc nol passed l>\ the end of the next and lasl session "f the 85th C 
they're jus' as dead as if they were put to a vote and defeated. 

• 1lii< tack on the chair i- the sharpest of all because death of a bill, whether from 
lack of action or from excess of votes against, is interpreted as showin i Con- 
gressional majority is eold to it. 

• Thus the burden has been shoved on Rep. Emanuel (Viler. Sen. < harles Potter, 
Sen. Strom Thurmond, and Rep. Oren Hani- the chief puns in the ' tv. 
They must gel Congress to -how definite Bigns of interest in countering the I ' ' 
move t" act on a test on or around I March 1 ( >">". 

Rumors to the effect that the military is casting covetous eyes al In channels 

2 through 6 (all the rumors seemed to emanate from one source) took ;i -even- 
jolt this week. 

The Office of Defense Mobilization and the FC< came to agreement about tut 
over to the Government some hand- now used for mobile radio services in rerun 
channels now used b) the Government 

The tun agencies did agree to put aside channel 2, hut onl) in the Far Pacific, 
where there is no commercial u-e for it. 

The FCC in a financial report issued this week offered an index of tv station reve- 
nues for 1956. 

\ total of 17! stations in 207 market- showed income of S551.350.856 
sales and talent, minus commissions. 

Operating expenses for these stations came to $4 75 which brought total 

net ineome before Federal taxes to 1146,256,481. 

Seven markets reported incomes of over S 10 million. 

SPONSOR • 28 SEPTEMBER 1957 63 






rriwwik-^ 






BLAIR -TV 

WFIL-TV Basic ABC 

WNBF-TV Basic CBS + ABC, NBC 

WFBG-TV Basic CBS + ABC, NBC 

THE KATZ AGENCY 

WNHC-TV Basic ABC + CBS 

BLAIR TELEVISION ASSOCIATES 

WLBR-TV Independent. . . 

World's Best Movies 



Sources: ARB, Philadelphia, Aug. 1957/Telepulse, Binghamton, Baltimore, Kansas City, Houston, Nov. 
1956 /Television Magazine, Nov. 1956 /SRDS, Mar. 1957/ ARB, Altoona, June 1957/ ARB Hartford- 
New Haven, June 1957 /Television Magazine, Sept. 1957/Trendex, Five-City Survey, Aug. 1957 




64 



SPONSOR 



28 SEPTEMBER 1957 



1 



St 



1 



St 



1 



St 



1 



St 



1 



St 



WFIL-TV 

in Philadelphia! MORE audience, 
SIGN-ON to SIGN-OFF, SEVEN 
DAYS A WEEK, than ANY other 
Philadelphia station! 

WNBF-TV 

from Scranton to Syracuse! 48.4% 
average rating-SEVEN NIGHTS 
A WEEK- MORE audience at 
lower cost per thousand than any 
station in Baltimore, Kansas City, 
Houston and other major markets. 

WFBG-TV 

from Pittsburgh to Harrisburg! 
143.4% MORE quarter-hour firsts, 
noon to sign-off, Monday-Friday, 
than nearest competitor. 

WNHC-TV 

from Massachusetts to Long Island ! 
DOUBLE the combined audience 
of competition, SIGN-ON to 
SIGN-OFF, SEVEN DAYS A 
WEEK! 



WLBR-TV 

UHF station to cover the entire 
LEBANON, LANCASTER, HAR- 
RISBURG,YORK area- Am erica's 
Number 1 UHF market— and at 
one-sixth the cost of nearest com- 
petitor. 278,044 UHF homes; 73.2% 
conversion ; 32.6% share of audience. 




WFIL-TV 

PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA 

WNBF-TV 

Bl N G H AM TO N , NEW YORK 

WFBG-TV 

ALTOO N A — J O HN STO W N, PA. 

WNHC-TV 

HARTFORD — NEW HAVEN, CONN. 

WLBR-TV 



LEBANON - LANCASTER, PA 



Operated by: Radio and Television Div. / Triangle Publications, Inc. / 46th & Market Sts., Philadelphia 39. Pa. 

WFIL-AM • FM • TV. Philodelphio, Pa. / WNBF-AM • FM • TV. Binghomton, N. Y. / WHGB-AM, Harrisburg, Pa. 

V WFBG-AM • TV, Alfoona-Johnstown, Pa. / WNHC-AM • FM • TV. Hartford-New Haven, Conn. / WLBR-TV, Lebanon-Lancaster, Po. 

I Triangle National Sales Office, 485 Lexington Avenue, New York 17, New York 



SPONSOR • 28 SEPTEMBER 1957 



65 



A round-up of trade talk, 
trends and tips for admen 



SPONSOR HEARS 



28 SEPTEMBER 

Copyright 1857 
SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INO. 



Tv columnists this week got the 1957-58 party line on ratings when they asked 
CBS for figures on new shows. The replv: 

"Our new policy is not to use ratings for publicity purposes; only for programing 
information." 

Meantime ABC started passing them out by the bale. 



The game of musical chairs in connection with the S8-milIion Bulova account 

has taken another turn at McCann-Erickson. 

Terry Clyne is hack in the No. 1 chair. Russ Johnston, who occupied it for a 
while, has been assigned to the Libby-Owen s-Ford account. 



Here's why a tv station in a metropolitan market suddenly was put on the block: 

Stockholder-relatives complained that it was bad enough the station wasn't making money 
without the president paying personal bills out of company funds. 

The official explained that his secretary had done this without authority while he 
was out of town. But the relative-stockholders still insist that it would be simpler to sell. 



Fred Gregg, Jr., former Y&R account executive, may have lit a new beacon for 

those who daydream about escaping to some little thing of their own. 

Instead of a farm or ranch. Gregjr. with the help of some friends, not so long ago 
scraped together a down payment on WLAP Radio. Lexington. Ky. 

This week, after scrounging around for equipment, he unveiled his own tv station. 
WKXP-TV. the second one in Lexington. 



The media director of an agency with over £20 million in tv billings got this come-on 
from a station this week: 

We'll give you a bonus of so many soots on package buys. The rep's confirma- 
tion will be according to rate card, but we'll forward you another confirmation show- 
ing the bonus spots. 

Commented the media director: "We're getting uneasy about this sort of wheedling 
and dealing among tv stations. You can't ever be sure another agency isn't getting a 
still better proposition." 



A midwest ad manager in New York for the debut of his network show says 
he feels like a neglected country cousin. 

Nobody from the network, he noted, so much as extended him a telephone greeting. He 
did get to see his show — after standing in line with other "tourists." 



One of network tv's biggest spenders gave these reasons for changing agencies: 

1. Too many people were switched around on the account. 

2. After the budget had been approved by the board of directors, the agency discov- 
ered it had failed to include netw r ork rate increases. 

Conversely, the president of this same account is credited with saving: "My policy is to 
milk an agency drv of ideas and then look elsewhere." 



66 



SPONSOR • 28 SEPTEMBER 1957 




(J Let's try that 

toothpaste!" 

Commercials on W GN-T\ have 
,1 wa) ol getting results because 
WGN-T\ programming keeps 
folks wide-awake, interested 
and watching. For proof, lei our 
specialists fill jrou in on some sur- 
prising \\ < . Y I \ case histories 
and discuss your sales problems. 



Put "GEE!" in your Chicago sales 

with WGN-T 



Channel9 
Chicago 



HEAR YE 




More listeners hear 



R AD I O 

WINSTON-SALEM 



H CAROL 



than the other three city 
stations combined 



flGQ 



5000 W-600 KC 



AFFILIATE FOR 

WINSTON SAIEM/ GREENSBORO/HIGH POINT 

CALL MEAOLEVREEO 



THE MARKETING VEEP 

i( mil iniinl from POgt '2, I 

holds it- annual sales meeting and the 
entire sales force "I 3,500 mum I 
all about the advertising plans foi i u 
nexl year. 

"In January, when these plan 
into print ami on the air, we know thai 
the entire Bales force is equipped to 
use "in advertising t" its fullest n i i 
sure, 1 says Bickmore. '"Our advei 
ii-in_' has I ►» -r - r i shaped 1>\ the reports 
of these men in the field in the firsl 
place, and shaped b) the dh ision man- 
agers during it- development, and pre- 
sented if the sales Force in il- final 

[O] III." 

Nabisco's advertising aims ma) dif- 
lii from those "f Campbell Soup oi 
Philip Morris or other companies with 
a marketing v.p. at the head <>f it- sales 
and advertising effort. But this gianl 
IimkI linn * method of shaping il- ad- 
vertising plans and its marketing v.p.'s 
influence upon them is parallel to t In-.- 
other companies. 

"In <>ur case, the purpo e of out ad- 
vertising is entirel) to sell the con- 
sumers, since we have a sufficient!) 
large sales force not to require the use 
ol it a- a mean- for [lu-hini: distribu- 
tion," Lee Bickmore told spoymik. 

"But we believe thai all selling and 
all markets are local and that our sales 
people in the field are alert to die needs 
ol these markets. We've encouraged 
them to tell ii- -peeifiealh what the) 
need in the wa) of advertising to sell 
our merchandise. Based on thai plus 
our advertising department and out 
agencies, we determine what coverage 
we need, be it da) time progi aming oi 
local participations or nighttime net- 
work t\ or spot. 

If one of the agencies want 3 to 1 

oininend a network t\ l>u\. il generall) 

talk- to the ad\ ertising directoi . I te 
in turn would take it up with his de- 
partment ami then, if convinced ol the 
value ol this vehicle, lie would make 
the recommendation to Bickmore. 

"I then discuss it with our sales and 
marketing people t" weigh theii reac- 
tion," -a\ - Bit kmore. 

The final oka) has to come from 
Bickmore, but if a sizable commitment 
i- involved, Bickmore would firsl dis- 
i il- it w it'i the executive n .p. .i'i>\ 
president of the company. Precisel) 
the same pattern hold- true al < anip- 
1 i '1 Soup Co. 

Network Inns: i Greene con- 



^RtPPETH 

i NO CENTRAL 

WISCONSIN ON 

WSAU-TV 





BEPSESENTED B* 
THE MEEKER CO INC o< HARRY HYEH 

*With only 1_8 class "C" announce- 
ments . 66 520 BUTTERNUT 
COFFEE can strips were sent to 
WSAU-TV 

Altho ALL North Central Wisconsin 
was stripped — there's still plenty of 
COVERAGE: 

population 540,420 

TOTAL RETAIL SALES $567,064,000 

GROSS FARM INCOME $207,408 000 

SOURCE 1956 SRDS ESTIMATES (> 
of Consumer Motets 



Mm 



WAUSAU, WIS. 




O.'.NED AND OPERATED BY 
WISCONSIN VALLEY TELVlSlON CORP 



SPONSOR 



28 SEPTEMBER 1957 



67 



WDBJ 

for 33 years 

OUTSTANDING 

in 

ROANOKE 

and Western Virginia 

RADIO 

by any measurement 1 . 



According to N. C. S. No. 2, 
WDBJ has more than TWO 
TIMES the DAILY N. C. S. 
Circulation of Station "B"; 
more than THREE TIMES the 
circulations of Stations "C" 
and "D". 

In the latest Roanoke Metro- 
politan Area Pulse Report. 
WDBJ has a 47% share of 
total morning audience, 43% 
share of total afternoon 
audience, and 38% share of 
total evening audience. 
Tune-in same periods is high: 
21.6, 23.8, 18.8. All figures 
are Monday through Friday 
averages. 

Ask your Peters, Griffin, 
Woodward "Colonel". 



WDBJ 

AM • 960 Kc. • 5000 watts 
FM • 94.9 Mo • 14,600 watts 
ROANOKE, VIRGINIA 



lmuoii>l\ -hop- new network U shows, 
Philip Morris' Rosa Millhiser told 
SPONSOR. "As marketing v.p., George 
\\ eissman has to okay such an expen- 
diture. Imt he is likel) to relj on the 
recommendations <>f the experts \\ 1 1 < > 
report to him. Naturally, he will co- 
ordinate the recommendation with top 
sales and marketing executives. But 
in the last analysis, Roger Greene is 
the expert in network talent and time 
negotiations." 

Not onl) does Greene continuously 

shop new network t\ developments, 
but like the top advertising executiw- 
at Campbell and Nabisco, he also has 
the big responsibility of being con- 
stantly on top of the changing agency 
picture. He keeps informed on the 
character and reputation of the agen- 
cies, creative accomplishments, account 
changes and other factors that would 
influence the choice of a new agent \ . 

The marketing v.p. would natural!) 
be intimately concerned in any Tien 
agency appointment at any company 
operating under this system. But the 
earliest eliminating and screening of 
prospective agencies, the preliminary 
evaluation of agencies' tv departments, 
for instance, would be handled bv the 
advertising director and his people. 

By the time the marketing v.p. en- 
ters the picture, there are likely to be 
no more than three or four agencies 
still in the running. 

Since the job of marketing v.p. is a 
new one, rarely if ever more than five 
\ ears old. there is no real pattern for 
a "typical marketing v.p." nor a fool- 
proof training ground for such a posi- 
tion. These are some of the appoint- 
ments of the past two years: In 1955. 
Hoffman Beverage Co. appointed 
Michael McCabe; General Electric, 
Jack S. Belden: Lever Brothers' Pep- 
sodent, T. E. Hicks: Lipton. M. A. 
Rilev : Pharmaceuticals. Irvin Dun- 
ston; RCA. B. M. Barrett, marketing 
director of appliances: S. J. Johnson. 
Robert A. Graef, marketing coordina- 
tor. 

In L956, Pillsburv appointed Arthur 
P. Loomis, marketing manager: Helene 
Curtis. Jack Doran. marketing director 
for toiletries: General Baking. Stuart 
ML Lenz; White Laboratories. 1". M. 
Schwemmer; Schlitz, John Toigo. 

Background : Nahisco's bee Bick- 
more, a slender, steel-jirey-haired man 
in his late forties, grew up in the com- 




GEE! 



That's some 



rug cleaner!" 

Commercials on WGN-TV have 
a wav of gctthiL' results — because 
WGN-TN programming keeps 
folks wide-awake, interested — 
and Hatching. For proof, let our 
specialists fill you in on some sur- 
prising WGN-TA case histories 
and discuss your sales problems. 



Put "GEE!" in your Chicago sales 

»th W GN-TV 



Channel 9 
Chicago 




MY 

MOMMY 

LISTENS 



More §om CUohrvvLo- 



Mommies and Papas Listen 
Daily to KiTE Than To 
Any Other Station^ 

<:::: NCS#2 
Call Avery-Knodel, Inc. 



68 



SPONSOR 



28 SEPTEMBER 1957 




SET YOUR SIGHTS ON 

KSTN 

1 Audience Getter 
m STOCKTON 

California 



Fact # 1 

In Stockton Pulse May, 
1957 KSTN leads the sec- 
ond station by 45% 



Fact # 2 

In Stockton Hooper 2nd 
Quarter 1957 KSTN leads 
second station by 71% 



Fact # 3 



By all accepted standards, 
KSTN has been the "most- 
listened-to station" in the 
BIG STOCKTON MARKET 
for the past four years. 




Member Station 

A-BUY in California 
Represented by 
GEORGE P HOLUNGBERY CO 



pany, rising through the ranks from 
shipping | >< ■ i in in Idaho in 1933 I he 
l.ulk of hi- Nabisco careei was in field 
work, Belling. 

I >.i< k in I 1 ' IT. the compan) set up > 
marketing • I i \ i — i • • r i within the sales de- 
partment, headed up b) a dire* toi ol 
marketing who reported t" the sales 
v.p. \i that time, the dire< i"i "I ad 
\ ci tising reported directl) i<> the i 
panj president, and linn- was no < los< 
tie-in between the t \% < ■ departments 

Bickmore came into the home office 
,i- sales v.p. in L950 and two years 
later, the director ol advertising re- 
ported to him. Eventually, line sales, 
marketing and advertising ' under theii 
respective directors) were brought into 
line reporting to him. 

( ampbell S<>ti|> Co.'s tall, \ oung 
fohn \lt ■( rlinn had a \ ei j similai i a- 
reei . He too started w iili the compan) 
and rose through the rank- via selling. 
McGlinn became a Campbell retail 
salesman in Philadelphia one year aftei 
Bickmore started with Nabisco in 
Idaho. He then rose steadil) through 
sales and product marketing without 
ever being either an adman < >r media 
man specifically . 

In March 1956 he was appointed 
v.p. in charge <>f marketing, suc< eeding 
I llarence Eldridge. H\ this time Camp- 
bell Soup had been operating under a 
product manager system for approxi- 
mate!) two years, a system the com- 
pan) continues in find efficient and 
suited i" ii- continuous gi owth. 

Philip Morris' George Weissman has 
had a more off-beat career. Weissman 
started out as a newspaperman, later 
shifted to p.r., and had hi- original 
dealings with Philip Morris as an ac- 
counl executive for Benjamin Sonnen- 
berg, publicit) consultants f<>r Philip 
Morris. 

Four years later. Wei — man joined 
the client as assistant t" the president 
and director "I public relations. Vnd 
half a year after that, in Januar) 195 I 
he was elected a \ .p. 

While Weissman nevei had an) di- 
rect selling or advertising experii 
he i- a 1939 graduate of the Bernard 
Baruch School "I Busine s ol CCNY. 

\- a Philip Morris \ .;>. over tin 
four j ears, he rapidl) b< ictive 

in helping t" shape i ompan) polic) for 
packaging, markel research and new 
product development as well as public 
'elation-. ^ 



Foremost in 
LITTLE ROCK 

and Central Arkansas! 




Leadership in 1_6 consecutive 

"/lim/iiTj'' proves it. \ntl hi rr- 

the latest "Pulse*' which km«-- 
k\ I < leadership in 1J10 oat ..f 220 
quarter-hoars weekly! 

Station 7AM-12Nn 12Nn6PM 



Sta A • 

Sta. B • 

Sta. C • 

Sta. D 

Sta. E • 

K V LC 



19 
13 
10 
10 
16 

22 



18 

14 

12 
12 

13 

20 



•Network affiliation. Figures represent pet 
ages of relative popularity during day. 

Cef the KVLC Success Story today! 
New York: Richard O'Connell. Inc 
South: Clarke Brown Company 
Chicago: Radio-TV Rep., Inc. 
West Coast: Tracy Moore t> Associates 



KVLC 

LITTLE ROCK 



SPONSOR 



28 SEPTEMBER 1957 



69 





&A 






& 



i 



^ 




i 



• 





i r 





f\ bridge is the fastest way to cross a river. When you take it— you buy time. 

Agencies and advertisers buy time tor the same reason — to get where 

the\ want to go — faster. Advertisers in SPONSOR hu\ 

space to sell their time faster because SPONSOR is their bridge— 

the quickest way to reach the ad\erliser-agenc\ team that buys the time. 

At the prestige price of $10 a year SPONSOR delivered more of these decision making teams 

than any other publication in the broadcast field. But one of the 

unhappy practices that must be faced b> all trade journals is 

the -routing list'". Manx men receive their "routed copy" as much as 5 weeks 

after the issue has left the press. In our opinion a good trade journal is the bread 

and butter thinking of the ver\ top minds in the industry. If it 

is worth reading at all — it is to the best interests of ever) 

practitioner to receive his copy promptl) and to give it his most serious 

consideration — AT HOME. 

SPONSOR— since its inception has been the most respected and the 

most widely quoted publication in its field. It has continuously offered its readers 

more with every passing issue. Consistently a pioneer, it has 

decided — in an historic move — to pioneer in the "routing 

practice" as well. That's why SPONSOR has 

reduced its rates from $10 to $3 a year. 

We believe that at this figure most everyone now on a routing list and 
thousands of potential new advertiser-agenev teams will become members of the 
ever growing family of SPONSOR READERS— AT HOME, 
and that it will be to the ultimate benefit oi everyone involved. 

There will be no increase in com per p 



THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE TV/RADIO ADVERTISERS USE 



NIGHTTIME 



WSAZ -TV 






Tv and radio 



EWSMAKERS 



DELIVERS 1000 HOMES 

BETWEEN 

7:30 and 10:30 P. M. 

FOR $1.30 



The second station's 

cost per thousand 

homes is $2.39 

84% Higher 



The third station's 

cost per thousand 

homes is $5.42 

317% Higher 



AND ANYTIME 

WSAZ-TV delivers 

ONE THIRD more 

total homes than 

both other 

Huntington-Charleston 

Stations COMBINED 



Source: June 1957 ARB 
All figures based on 
260-timc frequency 



CHANNEL S 



Wi 






HUNTINGTON-CHARLESTON. W. VA. 

XT.B.Q. STSTWOSS 

Affiliated with Radio Stations 

WSAZ. Huntington & WKAZ. Charleston 

LAWRENCE H. ROGERS, PRESIDENT 

Represented by The Katz Agency 



CALL YOUR KATZ MAN 







William E. Coyle has been named direc- 
tor 01 -ale- for W RC-TV, Washington, 

D. C. and Joseph W. Goodfellow pro- 

ijmm (gfbr united to station manager of W RC Radio. 

according to an announcement made this 
■k Ji&f- week h\ Carleton D. Smith, general man- 

^^. agei ol the two NBC owned and operated 

stations. Coyle joined NBC Washington 
in 1956 as director of advertising, promo- 
tion and public relations for both radio and tv outlets. He will con- 
tinue to be responsible for the public relations, promotion and ad- 
vertising plans for the two stations along with his new duties. Before 
joining NBC. Coyle was promotion manager for the Washington 
Evening Star. Goodfellow. who moved up from the director of sales 
post, joined NBC in 1949 as an account executive, then served as 
Eastern sales manager before moving to NBC Washington. D. C. 

Thomas H. Bateson's promotion to vice 
president of the Yankee Division of RKO 
Teleradio Pictures was announced this 
week by Norman Knight, president. Bate- 
son has been director of national sales and 
sales services for WNAC, WNAC-TV. Bos- 
ton, and the Yankee Network in New Eng- 
land since 1955. He left Northeast Air- 
lines to join Yankee's sales promotion de- 
partment in April, 1951. Four months later he was made national 
sales manager. In the aviation industry Bateson began as reservations 
agent with American Airlines in 1944. He joined Northeast the fol- 
lowing year as manager of reservation service and worked his way 
up to sales manager. Yankee savs that under his direction the na- 
tional sales operation has so expanded each year that VA N \C-T\ 
is second in the entire country in national spot business this \ear. 

Edwin Cox, former vice chairman of the 
board at Kenyon & Eckhardt, has been 
elected chairman of the board to replace 
Thomas D'Arcy Brophy who has retired. 
Replacing Cox on the executive committee 
is Donald C. Miller, senior vice president 
and co-director of account management. 
Cox joined K&E in 1933 and was elected 
a vice president in the following \ear. He 
became senior vice president in 1940 and vice chairman of the board 
last year. He began his advertising career as a copywriter for A. W . 
Shaw Co., Chicago, where he sta\ed six-and-a-half years and became 
assistant director of advertising. He then became ad manager for 
the Celotex Co. In 1928 he joined Lennen \ Mitchell. New York, 
three years later moved to Y&R and finalh to K&E. \cti\e in extra- 
curricular advertising work, he is a director-at-laree of the 4 Vs. 




SPONSOR 



28 SEPTEMBER L95' 




YOU MIGHT CAST .1 TROUT FLY 194 FEET* 

II IT I YOU NEED WKZO-TV 



AMERICAN RESEARCH BUREAU 

MARCH 1957 REPORT 

GRAND RAPIDS-KALAMAZOO 









Number of Qua 


rter Hours 




TIME 


PERIODS 


With Higher 


Ratings 




WKZO-TV 


Station B 


MONDAY 


THRU 


FRIDAY 






8:00 a.m. 


to 6:00 p.m. 


143 


57 


6:00 p.m. 


to 1 1 


00 p.m. 


94 


6 


SATURDAY 










8:00 a.m 


to 1 1 


:00 p.m. 


50 


10 


SUNDAY 










9:00 a.m. 


to II: 


00 p.m. 


40 


16 



NOTE: Survey based on sampling in the following proportions — Crand Rapids 
(42.8V- Kalamazoo '18.9V Muskegon '19.8V- Battle Creek 185V 



^ W ^ 




> J J7t e > icfije t Ufa fit / 1 •> 

WKZO-TV — GRAND RAPIDS-KALAMAZOO 
WKZO RADIO — KALAMAZOO-BATTLE CREEK 
WJEF RADIO — GRAND RAPIDS 
WJEFFM — GRAND RAPIDS-KALAMAZOO 
KOLN-TV — LINCOLN. NEBRASKA 

Associated with 
WMBD RADIO — PEORIA. ILLINOIS 



TO "MAKE THEM BITE" IN 
KALAMAZOO-GRAND RAPIDS! 

Take a Look al those March 1957 ARB figur - 
WKZO-TV is firsl in :V2~ oul of 116 quarter hours 

WKZO-TV is ; ; al Basic I BS T< levision Outlet 

ad Rapids. Telecasts 
with 100,000 watts S •> of 

America JO TV mai 

hortu - in U - item M \ I 

100,000 WATTS • CHANNEL 3 • 1000' TOWER 

WKZ0TV 

Studios in Both Kalamazoo and Crand Rapids 
For Greater Western Michigan 

Avery- Knodel. Inc.. Exclusive National Representatives 



* /«r A- ( rossfirlil. s«n Fninciscn. < tilifornia holtl* I hi* unrld\ rrcorii. 



SPONSOR 



28 SEPTEMBER 195*3 



J 



SPONSOR 



How to defeat fee tv 

The FCC has taken a step which is more complex than it 
look- on the surface. It has on the one hand yielded to unre- 
mitting pressure from fee tv forces by agreeing to accept 
applications for a "test." Yet on the other hand it has pro- 
vided for a long enough delay before the test so that anything 
can happen in the interim (particularly congressional inter- 
cession). Indeed we can well imagine the question of fee vs. 
free tv becoming an issue in the 1958 Congressional election. 

Despite the many obstacles fee tv still faces, however, the 
FCC's decision represents an entering wedge. If the fee tv 
forces play their hands correctly during the next few years — 
and do not reveal their full economic power to bid the best 
free programing away from the public — fee tv may come into 
full-powered operation. 

This would be a disaster. 

It would be a disaster to the public which would soon find 
itself paying for what it now can enjoy free. 

It would be a disaster to business which today relies 
heavily on free television as its open channel of sales com- 
munication with the public — a channel whose existence has 
helped underwrite much of the post-war marketing expansion. 

It would be a disaster to stations who would find them- 
selves required to program in the public interest while at the 
same time linked with cash-box operators who have had little 
previous experience in holding a public trust. 

As SPONSOR sees it stations are remiss in their public re- 
sponsibilities if they do not actively fight fee tv. 

In particular, on-the-air editorials should be used to ex- 
plain the fee tv danger. These need not be long. A few words 
following station identification may be more effective. Each 
station will know best how to speak up against fee tv in a 
in. nine! appropriate for its own community. 

Such a campaign, carried out intelligently, can go far to 
create a climate oi public and Congressional opinion in which 
fe< i\ (broadcast variety) would be removed as a threat to 
the American >v-tem of broadcasting. 



4 



sr\ 



THIS WE FIGHT FOR: //oil large is JOUT 
budget for radio and television commercials? 
In the press of decision-making for programs 
and time, don't forget the single most important 
air media basic: the commercial is the payoff. 



71 



lO-SECOND SPOTS 

Mild West: NTA's new television se- 
ries, Man Without a Gun, is billed as 
an "intellectual Western." Yippee. 
Egghead rides again! 

Whole in one: Slenderella Salons are 
adding products to service — bras. 
I. read and cookbooks. In addition to 
their spot radio campaign, one rep re- 
marked he'd like to see one all-encom- 
passing tv commercial showing a 
"good looking doll in bra and girdle 
reading a cookbook while eating Slen- 
derella bread spread with non-fatten- 
ing jelly." 

No-see-um: A press release from Of- 
ficial Films announcing its plans for a 
tv series based on H. G. Wells' The In- 
visible Man says, "No star has been 
selected as yet." Hardly seems neces- 
sary if he's going to be invisible. 

Potable tv: Video tape inspired Pro- 
gram Manager Douglas Elleson of 
KRON-TV, San Francisco, to invent a 
VTR (Video Tape Recording) cock- 
tail. Elleson interprets VTR to mean 
vodka, tequila and rum, but he is keep- 
ing the actual recipe a secret. And 
let's hope it stays a secret. 

Burma: U. Pe Thaw, director of Bur- 
mese Broadcasting Service, had a tour 
of NBC with Harvey Fondiller of NBC 
press department, and dropped these 
bits about Burma radio: There is one 
station, no call letters; it programs in 
Burmese. English and three native dia- 
lects. Station, founded in 1946, has 
no commercials now but hopes to in 
next few years. Working on the rate 
cards? 

Eastern pop: WW DC. Washington, 
reports great success with a disk album 
titled "Port Said*' by Mohammed El- 
Bakkar and his Oriental Ensemble. 
Only protest comes from d. j. Art 
Brown who says, "Titles like 'Geena 
Ghanneelak,' 'Bint II Geran" and "Banat 
Iskandaria' make me real unhappy." 
They don't make sponsor's linotyper 
happy either. 

Softies: For Lever's Dove toilet bar 
commercials on Art Linkletter's House 
Party, a pair of doves was flown from 
N. Y. l.ll.uild Airport to CBS TY in 
Hollywood. We can just hear some old 
bird say, "Before tv — when I was a 
fledgling — / used to fly to nark, not 
ride airlines." 






SPONSOR 



28 SEPTEMBER 1957 



WTIC-TV 



Landslide; 



• • • e • 



TIME 
P.M. 



WTIC-TV 



NETWORK STATIONS TOTAL SETS 
« A >, ,. B . « c „ |N USE 



7:00-7:30 


41.3 


5.5 


6.3 


5.5 


58.6 


7:30-8:00 


38.8 


10.1 


7.1 


4.9 


52.7 


8:00-8:30 


39.1 


8.6 


8.6 


9.8 


67.6 


8:30-9:00 


38.9 


6.1 


9.2 


14.6 


71.0 



Results of Special ARB Television Rating Survey — Metropolitan Hartford area — 7:00 to 9:00 P.M. 
Monday, September 23, 1957 



For details call Irwin Cowper, WTIC-TV General Sales Man- 
ager, or your nearest Harrington, Righter b Parsons man. 



WTIC-TV 

HARTFORD, CONNECTICUT 





AMONG THE OUTSTANDING 

TELEVISION STATIONS 

WE AUK PROT'D TO REPRESENT 

wabd New York, N.Y. 

wttg Washington, D. C. 

kglo-tv Mason City, Iowa 

khqa-tv Quincy, Illinois 

wfbc-TV Greenville, South Carolina 

wusn-tv Charleston, South Carolina 

ktnt-tv Seattle-Tacoma, Washington 

xetv San Diego, California 



WEED 

TELEVISION 

TELEVISION STATION REPRESENTATIVES 

new york • Chicago • detrolt • san francisco 
atlanta • boston • hollywood • des molnes 



PAH I wo 

OF SPONSOR 

28 September 1957 



THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE TV/RADIO ADVERTISERS USE 




OF THE 

MEMPHIS 

TRADE AREA 

IS 



iegro 



and the only way 
to reach them is with 






NDIA 



*** 



*** 



*« OO 



<\o^ 



5° '%' 



><C3< S 



\tf* 



w 



o« 



l« 



V\oo9 



c< 



?o\ 



COVERS THE "GOLDEN MARKET" OF 1,230,724 NEGROES — 
NEARLY 1/1 OTH OF AMERICA'S TOTAL NEGRO POPULATION! 



6th ANNUAL 
NEGRO MARKET 
SUPPLEMENT 

llii- edition contains, 
in addition to the fol- 
low ing 3 ai tides, • 
histories, national ad- 
vertisers ii-in^: V 
radio, st .i t i on il.i i .i . 



Negro market: 
why buyers are 
looking twice 

Page 3 



Agency analysis: 
Admen tell why, how 
they buy Negro radio 

Page 6 



Negro stations: 
they work with and 
sell the community 



Page 10 




Ik 



w & 



The leading Negro air personalities in the East are now on 
WDAS. In this part of the country, WDAS has all the important 
talent. 

It's a foregone conclusion that outstanding Negro personali- 
ties make WDAS the nation's top Negro station. Their names, 
and the names of their shows, are household words among 
Negroes. Their commercial appeals are personalized to sell 
your product most effectively. 

We believe that the total years of service of WDAS' Negro 
personalities is the highest anywhere. Year in and year out, 
our talent's day by day exposure to our listeners builds audi- 
ences . . . large responsive Negro audiences with an ingrained 
WDAS habit. With programs that have been consistently top- 
rated by Pulse, WDAS has more Negro listeners than any 
other Philadelphia station, network or independent. 

Every advertiser interested in the heart of the great Delaware 
Valley must be interested in its vast Negro population 
(America's third largest). With its proven audience appeal . . . 
with its active CONTINUING COMMUNITY SERVICE program 
. . . with its aggressive PROOF OF PERFORMANCE MERCHAN- 
DISING service . . . WDAS is your key to the 600,000 plus 
Negroes in the Metropolitan Philadelphia area. 

To sell Philadelphia's Negro market, join this group 
of advertisers starting the Fall season with WDAS: 



Anahist 
Beechnut Gum 
Budweiser Beer 
Camels 

Carnation Milk 
Carolina Rice 
Coca-Cola 



Mitch Thomas 



•*'-•.. 



Contadina Foods 
Freihofer Bread 
Gillette 
Lucky Strike 
Quaker Oats 
Schmidt's Beer 
Wrigley Gum 



Kae Williams 



Randy Dixon 



.^ 



¥ 



Julian Graham 



Art Peters 



Georgie Woods 



Bernice Thompson 



rhe Philadelphia Negro Market's Most Powerful Station 

il Representatives John E. Pearson & Co., New York, Chicago. 
Minneapolis, Atlanta. Dallas, Los Angeles, San Francisco 



Belmont Avenue and Edgely Road 
Philadelphia 31, Pennsylvania 
Phone— TRmity 8-2000 



® 



Pulse 
March '57 



® 



Jg ro Ratings 

Morning 

Afternoon 

and 

Night 

in Results 



For Local Advertisers! 

TWO BIG 
REASONS WHY 

23 

of America's Finest 

national products have 
added schedules to 
W J L D since September 
1956 

to 

Sell to the vast 240,000 
strong Negro market of 

Metropolitan 
Birmingham. 



May we work 
for you, too? 




LD 



AM 
FM 



BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 

The Nation's Finest 
Negro Radio Station 

Represented by FORJOE 



SPONSOR'S 

6TH ANNUAL 
NEGRO ISSUE 

Editor and Publ •-!••-• 

Secretary-Treasurer 

VP A-.-.. -.(..,. fl'i, I.I,. mei 

Bernard ' 

General Manager 



EDITORIAL DEPARTMENT 
Executive Editor 

:.' David 

News Editor 



Senior Editors 

Alfred J. Jaffe 

Evelyn Konrad 

Jane Pinkerton 

W. F. Miksch 

- n I I : » - 

Barbara Wilkens 

Assistant Editors 

Joan W. Holland 

Jack Lindrup 

Lois Heywood 

Contributing Editors 

Bob Foreman 

Joe Csida 

Art Editor 

Phil Franznick 

Production Editor 

Erwin Ephron 

ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT 
New York Manager 

Charles W. Godwin 
Western Manager 

CooDer 
Southern Manager 
Herb Ma 

Midwest Manager 
Sam B. Schneider 
Mid-Atlantic Manager 
Donald C. Ft 

Production Manager 
Jane E. Perry 

Administrative Staff 
Dorris Bowers 
Georqe Becker 

Circulation Department 
Seymour Weber 
Emily Cutillo 
Estelle Schulman 
Accounting Department 
Laura Oken 
Laura Datre 
Readers' Service 
Mar 2nd 

Member of Business Publications 
Audit of Circulations Inc. 



SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC 

combined with TV. Executive. Editorial. Grcu 
lation and Advertising Offices: 40 E. 49th St 
1 49th 6 Madison' New York 17. N. Y. Tele- 
phone: MUrray Hill 8-2772. Chicago Office 
612 N. Michigan Ave Phone SUpenor 7 -9863 Ion 
Angeles Office 6C87 Sunset Boulevard Phone 
HOIIywood 4-8089. Printing Office: 3110 Elm 
Ave.. Baltimore 11. Md. Subscriptions United 
States S3 a year. Canada and foreign S4. Sin 
gle copies 20c. Printed in USA. Address al> 
correspondence ro 40 E. 49th St.. N. Y. 17 
N. Y. MUrray Hill 8-2772. Published weekly b» 
SPONSOR Publications Inc. Entered as 2nd clav 
matter on 29 January 1948 at the Baltimo-c 
postoffice under the Act of 3 March 1879 

Copyright 1957 

Sponsor Publications Inc. 



CHANNEL 3 

DELIVERS THE 

NEGRO 
VIEWERS 

IN THE 

SHREVEPORT 
MARKET 

With NBC and ABC 
Programming PLUS 

if Nat King Cole 

if Wednesday & Friday 
Night Fights 

if Shreveport Negro 
C. of C. Program 

if Ink Spots 

if The Red Heads 

k Duke Ellington 

if The Guardsmen 

if Lionel Hampton 

* Mr. & Mrs. 88 

Your BONUS Station 
with Maximum Power 

KTBS«7i> 

CHANNEL 

SHREVEPORT 
LOUISIANA 

E NEWTON WRAY. PresiJcnt & Cen Mgr 

NBC and ABC 




H'prese-'tfd by 



Edward Petry & Co., Inc. 



SPONSOR NEGRO ISSUE 



28 SEPTEMBER 195"; 



3% MILLION NEGROES WITH 
5 BILLION DOLLARS TO SPEND! 



YOU CAN REACH THEM 

only with these Rollins Stations 
at a New Low Cost 



ALL FIVE 
BIG ROLLINS MARKETS 

COMBINED— FOR AS LOW AS 



$ 



36.90 



■ a 



. on the ROLLINS 
"SINGLE TRACK" PLAN! 

when you buy all stations 
when you buy . . . stations 
when you buy . . . stations 



Contact a 
Rollins Man at. . 



inute, 1,000-time rale 



NEW YORK OFFICE: 565 Fifth Ave., Oxford 7-7040 
CHICAGO: 6205 S. Cottage Grove, NOrmal 7-4 T 24 
ST. LOUIS: Arcade Building, CHestnut 1-6000 



NEW YORK 

WNJR 

Newark, N. J. 
5000 watts 

The only All-Negro station in 
the world's biggest and richest 
Negro market — New York! 



CHICAGO 



Harvey, III. • 1000 watts 

The only All-Negro station in 
the Chicago area ... the enor- 
mous, rich No. 2 Negro market! 



ST. LOUIS 

KATZ 

5000 watts 

The only Negro station in 
St. Louis, the 4th highest Negro 
income area in the nation! 



NORFOLK 

WRAP 

5000 watts 

The only full-time Negro sta- 
tion in Virginia ... the No. 1 
All-Negro station in the State. 



INDIANAPOLIS 

WGEE 

5000 watts 

The only regular Negro pro- 
gramming within the prosper- 
ous Indianapolis trading area! 



SPONSOR NEGRO ISSUE • 28 SEPTEMBER 1957 



SPONSOR'S SIXTH 
ANNUAL NEGRO ISSUE 



l.THE NEGRO MARKET: why 
buyers are looking twice 

Marketing men and media people are taking a long neM look al the 
17 million Negroes and ihrir purchasing power. The) a*U : do you 
srll Negroes with mass media, with specialized appeals or — both? 



ELmii in marketing terms, the Negro 
lives in a segregated world. 

But must national advertisers, de- 

spite their awareness of various mi- 

norit) groups within the mass, tend to 
use mass media to reach everyone 
rather than specialized media to reach 
certain segments of this mass audience. 

I heir logic: We cover everyone 
black, white, green or red. Catholic, 
Jew or Holy Roller when we bu) na- 
tional mass media. So win segregate? 
Win bu) specialized mass media, such 
as Negro-appeal radio? 

Actually, there are several ap- 



by Jane Pinkerton, project editor 

proaches t<> the buying of such a mi- 
nority-appeal medium as Negro radio. 

• Some advertisers manufacture .1 
product identified particular!) with one 
group. In the Negro market, the more 
ol>\ ious t\ pes ol radio sponsoi are the 
hair and cosmetic products manufac- 
tured specificall) for Negro use. 

• Other advertisers produce general 
items which have special appeal to the 
Negro e\ en though the produ< t i- dis- 
tributed and consumed l>\ non-\etrroe< 
a- well. I a id. for example, hits 1 
much higher rate of consun ption 
am one Negroes than whit.--. Neero 



women not onl) bu) more ho- 1 
the) pa) more for it. I he < onsump- 

lion rate of meat. poultr) and -alt 
,1111011- main other food products i- 

lai bighei among Negroes than white-. 
The) also spend more on theii clothing 
generall) speaking, both in tern - 
clothing cosl and in 1 ei< entage of • 
disposable income. 

• Still other advertisers have spe» ial 
marketing problems or public relations 
pi oblems w hie h lead t.. selet tion of 
Mi j'i media. Representative cases f"i 
each .if the-.- situations might he: 1 1 1 
a sudden drop-off in product distrihu- 



Top dj's hi WD IS, Philadelphia, man the Home Fair shun- booth 
stocked nith products oj station sponsors. Julian Graham 
extra impact tor Tetley Tea. Kool-Aid, Pet Mill; tram fans 





Public service g with KI>I4. Memphis, mth such jitorno- 

>i> 26-team If l>l t lino-hall League. Rail plarers ride rnloriul 

thmi in Cotton Makers* Jubilee parade through Xrgro neighborhood*. 



NEGRO MARKET continued . 

Factors in admen's re- 
appraisal of this mar- 
ket: higher wages, more 
diversified employment, 
more education, moves 
to the bigger cities 





Cheesecake and popularity are big audi- 
ence getters everywhere. WMRY, New 
Orleans, awarded prizes to these queens 



Business, industry leaders in Negro 
community cooperate in programing 
concepted with WMFS, < hattanooga 




Ad specialist in Negro market is 
Robert Leatherwood of Detroit who 
analyzes appeal of disk jockey 



tion in Negro neighborhood food or 
drug stores; (2l the emergence of a 
Negro dealer as No. 1 in his market. 

• Then there are the advertisers 
who use both a shotgun and a rifle ap- 
proach in their advertising. These will 
buy a general-appeal schedule supple- 
mented with a bolstering tactic in spe- 
cial-appeal media. 

Even though the great majority of 
national advertisers tend to ignore the 
specialized market there's continuing 
progress. Biggest change is a grow- 
ing awareness by national advertisers 
that the Negro market has potential for 
them. More companies — clients and 
agencies alike — are beginning to look 
more closely at their sales potential 
among Negroes. 

What is this potential? It varies 
from product to product, of course. 
But in general terms the Negro market 
profile looks something like this: 

Population: There are 18.2 million 
Negroes in the U. S. — more than the 
combined populations of New York, 
Chicago, Los Angeles and Philadel- 
phia. With the continuing migration 
of the Negro — from South to North, 
from rural to urban areas, from small- 
er cities to big industrial areas — main 
cities have shown a recent astronomi- 
cal gain in Negro population. 



Examples: Between 1940 and 1955, 
the New I ork metropolitan area Negro 
population grew by 83% : Chicago, 
160$ : Washington.' D. C, 107%; De- 
troit. 146%: Los Angeles, 347% ; San 
Francisco-Oakland, 831%: Cleveland. 
137%. I Figures are from Ebony 
magazine. June 1957.) Some of these 
statistics cannot be ignored by the ad- 
vertiser who wants to reach the Negro. 

Y\ hat are some other trends? 

The number of Negro students in 
high schools, colleges and universities 
is increasing rapidly as income levels 
rise and as more facilities become 
available. Income is on the rise, too. 
In some cities, such as Detroit, Negro 
income is about 90% that of the white 
— almost $5,000 a year. Nationally, in 
1955 the non- white median wage or 
salary for men was $2,418: the white, 
$4,331. Nationally, 99.9% of non- 
whites earn less than $7,000 a vear; 
91.3% of the whites. Some 47% of 
non-white men earn from $2- to $7,- 
000; 62% of the white men. 

Negroes are moving into new jobs, 
too. With the shift from rural to urban 
and from small town to big citv. the 
Negro is getting more responsible jobs 
which require greater manual or pro- 
fessional skill. In 1948. one in five 
Negroes worked in agriculture; today, 
it's down to one in seven. 



These trends indicate one thing for 
a manufacturer or producer: a large 
unified group which now has more 
buying power, more sophisticated con- 
sumption patterns, more economic and 
social stability, more education and 
know-how. This is why advertisers are 
taking a second look at the Negro. 

Income levels: Lets look at the in- 
come pictures of Negro and white. For 
the Negro, the pattern looks something 
like a triangle with the point at the top 
— a heavy bottom layer of low income 
people peaking upward to a small num- 
ber of high income earners. In con- 
trast, the white pattern looks some- 
thing like a diamond set on end — 
points at the top and bottom and peak- 
ing out in the middle. There is a rel- 
atively small group of the lowest and 
the highest earners, the largest group 
being in the middle. 

But the Negro pattern is changing 
slowly into a diamond shape as income 
levels and consumption patterns rise. 
The lowest income people are moving 
into this middle majority area. So 
predicts Clarence Holte, director of the 
Negro marketing division of BBDO, 
New York. 

On many items, the Negro spends 
far more proportionately than does the 
white familv of the same income. One 



SPONSOR NEGRO ISSUE • 28 SEPTEMBER 1957 




KCOH 



1 hJ' T 




Most agencies see u direi i relationship between the station's 
standing among lot nl Vegroes and iis sales results. k<OH. 
Houston, airs Pepsi Cola party from Segro community center 




Drama, color, 

/ ii- ■ k 1 1 > \ Long Beat h, 

■'■rords 




He looks real Imi it\ n life size cutout •>< lohi Hardy, Av s I\ 
San Francisco personality. Burgermeister beer, sponsor of halt- 
hour daily slum, gets huge windou mi city's busy Marl.'' 



Stud) circulated 1>\ Ebony magazine 
and conducted 1>\ the I niversitj ol 

1Viuis\ Ivania show- these comparisons. 

Analysis of Negro and white fami- 
lies shows the average after-tax income 
of Negro Families was (>()', that of the 
white families. Yet the Negro spent 
71.895 of what the white families did 
on food; 92.4' I on alcoholic bever- 
ages; S'2 r 'r on fuel and lijiht 1 see addi- 
tional figures in chart below (. 

The Nemo credit is good, too. Some 



33' 1 of all Negro families own theii 
own homes. A Savings and Loan As- 
sociations report on Negro and white 
home financing shows these compari- 
sons: I he average white conventional 
loan. S4.«)U1 ; average Negro. SI. 721: 
average white GI loan. $5,726; aver- 
age Negro (.1. >">.<> l'». 

The report added: Negro loans pre- 
sented no more of a collection problem 
than those of other mortgagors; more 
than .'ill'/ of the loans paid ill advance 



Comparison of Negro-W hite consumption patterns, 


all income 


groups, urban, 1950 






Negro as 






per cent 




Negro White of White 




Number of families in sample 


1,294 


11.136 






Average after-tax income 


$2,605 


- I. 'I'.l 


64. 1 




Average expenditure on total 


$2,614 


- 






consumption 






66. 




Total consumption 


100. 0°o 


LOO.O 






1. Food 


31.9 


29 5 


71.8 




2. Ucollolic liruT.mr- 


2.3 


1.7 






3. Tobacco 


2.1 


1.8 


81.2 




1. Housing 


11.3 


II.'. 






5. Furl, light, etc 


5.0 


1.1 






t>. Household operation 


4.1 


1.7 






7. Furnishings S equipment 


7.2 


6.8 


69.9 




8. Clothing 


13.6 


11.3 






9. Automobile expenses 


7.0 


L1.9 






10. Other transportation 


2.6 


1.7 


103.0 




11. Medical care 


3.7 








12. Persona] care 


3.0 




91.9 




13. Recreation, etc. 


4.8 




'.-'.7 




1 1. Miscellaneous 


1.1 


1.5 






* Tlu inn are ratios 


of thr 




Whites 




Source: Study of Consumer Expenditures ( 


Philadelphia. Inlrersity of Pennsylvania, 1 • 


New Light on tlie Consumer Market by Irwi 


< Review." 


January Februirj I5J Pi . 


PI 


S 





of the due date were 1 1« - 1 ■ I bj N< •_ • 
Credil standing: Savings and loan 
assoi iations report the) make more 
home loans to Negroes than t<> all 
other types oi lenders combined. These 
institutions hold more than X J 10 mil- 
lion of Negro home morl ore 
than Tit.' , of the I , x . total according 
to the I . S. Sa\ ings and Loan I t 

rhese patterns in income, popula- 
tion, migration and buying habits are 
the reasons wh) the Negro market, as 
.11. tie entit] from the total market, 
etting the hardest marketing push 

in it- bistoi J . 

\\ bo's doing the pushing ? N( 
media, pi imaril) . 

Ihete are very feu Negro advertis- 
ing agent ies and most of t: ■ -• 
operated pretrj much out of 
booth. I here are Few Negro market- 
ing consultants on the pay roll of la 

era! advertising agencies or manu- 
facturers. So mOSl Of the Selling nf 

this cmi epl is 1 <»i n - done hv n t 
and thei -■ ntatives bj Ne- 

stations and their representatives, 
bj newspapers and magazines in the 
N< .1 •■ field. 

I here's a breakthrough • 
however. More manufacturers are hir- 
ing Negro held men and Negro mar- 
1 Please turn to . 



2. AGENCY ANALYSIS: admen tell 
why and how they buy Negro radio 

They look for strong local personalities, stations with impact in 
their communities, merchandising in Negro stores, solid results. 
Buyers like stations with Negro market savvy and loyal listeners 



I here are 154 national advertisers 
cited bv the Negro radio stations them- 
selves as spending the most money in 
Negro-appeal radio. They're listed 
elsewhere in this section in the order 
of the mentions they received. 

Outdistancing the others in terms of 
mentions was J. Strickland and Co. for 
its Royal Crown hair dressing, a prod- 
uct identified exclusively with the Ne- 
gro consumer. But the runners-up — 
Carnation and Pet Milk, Wrigley gum, 
SSS tonic — have general distribution 
and general consumption even though 
the) know they have unusual strength 
in the Negro realm. 

Analysis of these 154 top advertisers 
in the Negro radio market shows the 
following: Most of the Negro radio 
schedules and money is coming from 
food products, 47 of them, followed by 
1 1 rugs with 35 and beer, ale and wine 
with 20 different companies. Other 
categories: cigarettes and tobacco, 13; 
cosmetics, 12; household items, 11; 
gasoline and oil products, 7; miscella- 
neous, 4; automotive. 3; magazines 
and insurance, 1 each. 

In the following report you'll find a 
compendium of advertising agency 
thinking — why some agency executives 
bin Negro-appeal radio as part of an 
over-all general buy and why others 
buy it as a very specialized medium. 
They represent various companies with 
various types of services and/or prod- 
ucts. In each case, the media selection 
is the aftermath of a marketing analy- 
sis. 

Here is some of the philosophy of 
the person who directs the purchase of 
;ro radio or who carries out such a 
media decision. 

Sinclair Refining: Typical of the 
school of advertising which look- on 



a mass audience without regard for its 
composition in terms of color is Wil- 
liam L. Wernicke, vice president of 
Morev. Humm & Warwick in New 
York. 

Wernicke is currently directing 
what's believed to be radio's biggest 
buy — 10,000 spot announcements a 
week for a full 52-week schedule on 
some 900 stations — the selection of sta- 
tions based mainly on local coverage. 
In specific areas, Negro stations were 
selected, but only when such a station 
fits naturally into the local radio cov- 
erage pattern. The client is Sinclair 
Refining Co., which recently put its 
entire broadcast budget into radio — 
local radio — to give the widest cover- 
age of local motorists with no attempt 
to draw lines between white, Negro or 
any other group. 

Here are some of Wernicke's con- 
cepts in discussing the Negro market 
as a specialized audience contrasted 



with the total mass market. 

"We're advertising for everyone — 
all races, colors, creeds, all age groups 
and occupations. With a massive 
schedule of 900 stations there is little 
need for microscopic segmentation of 
splinter groups. Of course, every rea- 
sonable effort is made to select sta- 
tions that enjoy stature in their mar- 
kets — stature with respect to total au- 
dience. And since any total is the sum 
of its component parts, it follows that 
the general coverage pattern will in- 
clude its fair fraction of all lobate 
groups of lesser magnitude." 

But these conclusions are based on 
this particular product's needs. Gaso- 
line, unlike many items, has a very 
generalized distribution and consump- 
tion pattern. But even gas, under cer- 
tain circumstances, would find a higher 
rate of distribution I service stations) 
and usage in some areas among special 
groups making up the whole market. 



Admen explain how, their specific accounts rel< 



Douglas Humm 

Charles W. Hoyt 



William Wernicke 

Morey. Humm anil Warwick 



Sol Israel 

N. W. Ayer 





SPONSOR NEGRO ISSUE • 28 SEPTEMBER 195, 



Wernicke think- main products, be- 
cause "I qualifying elements, could 
benefit from tlir use of specialized 
Negro radio, Bui he think- most prod- 
ucti manufactured 1>\ national adver- 
tisers the mass-appeal items such as 
cigarettes, breakfast roods, soaps, cars 

gain their advertising and sales 
goals b) use ol mass media in a judi- 
cious manner. 

Is it worthwhile to make a special- 
ized appeal t" certain audience seg- 
ments after you've made your initial 
Unpad w ith mass media ? i es, he bsj b. 
He sees specialized radio as a supple- 
mental medium assuming the Bales po- 
tential and the advertising budget are 
both permissive. \fter the majoi 
bases have been touched a national 
advertiser could well look into develop- 
ing a market in the specialized area 
of the Negro, says Wernicke. 

\n analog] might he this: Vlmost 
everyone eat- fish so a frozen hsh pro- 
ducer might well tr\ to sell everyone 
on the idea of consuming his product. 
Bui supplemental!) it might l>e a good 

idea for this same producer to trigger 
hi- advertising more specifically to 
Catholics. If there were a Catholic- 

appeal medium, it. a- a sound second- 
ary !>u\. would pinpoint the specific 
market and add impact. 

In the Negro area. Wernicke think? 
both buyer and seller need to sharpen 
up on their comprehension of this spe- 
cial market and their use of it. 

"Too man) seller- sell on the l>a-i- 
that theirs is the only medium which 
reaches the local Negroes, This just 
isn't true. Maybe their station reaches 
Negroes best, hut tin- take'- proof 
(Please turn to page 36) 



Megro-appeal radio 



Sam Vitt 
Dohrrl\. Clifford 




G. W. Briggs, Jr. 

BBDO 





Bud wi -in r 

' '■ ' 

Armstrong and laiu ■ 

make 

■■• pro 

\>liilllU Is 

tin it m Inn in Vi 



Royal Crown hau product*, 

■ si national mlt ei I 
in \ 

push nut sulr ii, i 

lo /; it in 

\ • I, ) ,,ll. . ;., >| 

Rt . .;• . mi .1. go ■ i adillat 



Many accounts i mm 

tin a/ station Ims ^ i 
kel tpei uili\t< is it 

u rh k^ I) San I 

I.. In r.. gjn. II i , m . 

■urn I mi ■ I i 

II, rbert Cakn I ( 



Remote crew, sut h us this 
one from If lOk. Tampa, 
goes intn Iik al neighbor- 
hoods, ties bonds li.uliter be- 
tween station ami commu- 
nity . In mil: m rr Jrrome 

Tate talks with i>assersby, 
xii rs sponsors extra identity 



More than 40,000 listeners 
to WLOl . Louisville, regis- 
tered lor prizes in station's 
fifth anniversary celebration. 
II inners above received more 
than $1,000 worth <>' <alu- 

able items in the promotion 



SPONSOR NKGRO IS-l K • 2!! SKI'TEMBER 195"i 



Armour Star lard, uhich 
buy s selected \ rum sta- 
tions, got heax | in-store pro- 
motion from Kim: Bee, dj 
at IT II Ml.. Macon. II ■ i.road- 
a large 
independent grocer, inter- 
■' display 



666 cold preparations 
Irtra Skin I am. 

both big sellers in the \ • 

market, are featured in 
store display In U OK . ' 
lumbia. S. C. S like 

store broadcasts tor f 
and personalized meat 




3. CASE HISTORIES 

stations report sales 
and audience results 



These summaries from all parts of the country show 
how every type of advertiser, product and service 
gains sales, good will or traffic with Negro radio. 
In this medium, too, consistency and personal selling 
pay off for the advertiser who pre-plans drives 



■ 



^"\ery advertiser is interested in 
local-level proof of performance. Per- 
haps, because of his distance awav 
from the scene of the advertising, the 
national advertiser is even more intent 
in determining a Negro station's local 
standing. The local advertiser, be- 
cause he is located in the communitv 
and has day-to-day evidence of the sta- 
tion's status, knows without even ask- 
ing what type of response he is likely 
to get. 

Stations answering sponsor's Negro 
market questionnaire included many 
local case histories — reports which in- 
dicate in terms of sales performance or 
of audience reaction that the advertiser 
is getting the results he seeks. Here is 
a cross-section of these case histories 
as to type of product or business. 

Retailers' promotion: When the 
Broadway Pharmacy in Gary, Ind.. 
celebrated the grand opening of its new 
super drug store, 14 other retailers in 
the same block joined in advertising 
on WJOB. They contributed 82,500 
for sponsorship of the Dizzy Dixon 
Show for 12 days from 2 to 3:30 p.m., 
broadcast as a remote from the phar- 
macy window. Dixon played records, 
interviewed guests, gave away prizes 
and introduced recording artists. 

In a two- week period, more than 




Belk's department store i see story) in Edgefield, S. C, uses schedule on 
II II G, Augusta, Ga., and pulls store traffic with personal appearance of J. If \ man 
White. Manager J. B. illen says Xegro business has gone up some 20% since start 
of campaign. Department stores, long shy of radio, are moving to Negro shows 



Pepsodent's familiar "yellow" theme was subject of 
station contest nationally. If' I.I H. New York, 4th prize 
winner, won with crew ashing "If'here did the yellow 
go " If LIB gave i>ri;e to inter-racial children's camp 



>\ K.NSOR NEGRO ISM E 



28 SEPTEMBER 1957 



I"). noil people visited the drug store to 
u.iti li the show, and traffic in othei 
stores was similarly far above normal. 
\ Rexall Co. representative, \% h< • sup- 
plies the drug store, said it was the 
most "spectacular" grand opening he 
had ever Been. \nd the cooperating 
retailers were so impressed with theii 
traffic and Bales thai t h«\ plan t" stage 
the advertising again as .1 pre-Christ- 
mas promotion. 

Beer: WKDL, Clarksdale, Miss., re- 
ports these sales results. Oertel's 92 
beer showed an increase "from one to 
1,500 cases after the first month of 
advertising." Such is the summary of 
Charles llaik. manager of the Highlife 
Beverage Co., which distributes three 
major beers then-. 

< )«>t li i n«r : Audrey Josephson, mana- 
ger of the Darling Shop in Memphis, 
comments on her air schedule on 
Wink there. 

'" \l>out a year ago we started adver- 
tising on WI.OK. using 20 one-minute 
announcement- a week. The results 
have been wonderful, sometimes almost 
unbelievable. It seems that almost any- 
thing we advertise in ladies' readv-to- 
wear, milliner) or children's clothes 
gets immediate results. 

"WI.OK i- the onh advertising we 



do in the city of Memphis outsidi 

OUr OY n w indow - on Mam Str< 

I I product : W W III \. u ^ ork, 

combined on-the-aii advertisin with 
in-store promotion to push Carnation 
Milk, now "the leading seller in N 
neighboi I Is in New ^ ork." 

( ai nation bought a s< bedule of our. 
minute announcements on the station's 
loin leading programs through I 1 w in, 
Wasey & Co. advertising agency. Mrs. 
\hiia \ essels John, who conducts 
W W RL'a Homemakers < lul>. was ( bo- 
sen as the person to ^i\<- endorsement 
to the product because "I bei active 
c i\ ic work in the Negro community . 

Picture- o| Mrs. John in her home 
and at the radio Studios were used iii 
full-page prinl advertisements in the 
Negro pic—. She also conducted a 
contest for radio li-teners asking for 
the best recipe- with Carnation milk. 
re< ei\ in:.' 1,800 entries. 

Jeweler: \llan Baker, advertising 
manager of Watch Shop Jewelry store 
in Louisville, -a\s this of his schedule 
on W I.Ol : "This station opened more 
accounts for us in one month than anj 
other medium. It outpulled the dail) 
newspaper advertising returns at the 
rate of five to one on the same promo- 
tion campaign." 



I ood product : Dixie I ily floui 
bought a -1 hedule on W MUM. M 1 
B< 11 h, based on two 1 oni epts I 
( hildien today are shopp 1- of tomoi 
low and 1 b 1 more immediately 
da) - parents send theii youi 
food stores to shop. 

I he ad\ ertising : a program on 

W MUM whi< h aided the Ni 1 « hil- 

• ■I Miami. It sponsors bro idi asts 

Saturday aftei 1 n t> ■ mi e 

■ •! Ii\ tin- Miami Police • olored 

• rolenl \--11. I he two bom broad- 

■ .1-1 has Bold produi ts and attrai ted 

teens that the event 

moved t" a new v 

ter accommodating L,000 youngsters. 

\n agent J man from the If. M. Ham- 

mond Co says: "1 he results have more 
than justified the expenditure. We 
have received more results pei adver- 
tising dollar -pent on W MI'.M than in 

an) othei media we have used." 

Drug -tore product: Last yeai Jon- 
nie Clark, advertising manager of K- 
stone Labs., Memphis, which makes 

Vid hair products, w role thi- to 
\\ MRY, New Orleans: 

"After a yeai of continuous broad- 
casting on your station, sales have 
shown a nice increase over the previ- 
ous year before we used \"iir station 

■ Please turn to page I" I 





Merchandisers 

in'j in 



Full house H U>K D 

ihrair 1 - 



Sterling salt tested Vegro radio tor first time on if V/A'. Sewarh, 
liked results so much it's now on 52-week contract. Air time was backed 
with in-Store displays a-ui personal appearances. S rtsor's district man- 
user said stores "sold tour to tire eases per hour, p 




4. NEGRO-APPEAL STATIONS: they 
work with and sell the community 

Negro stations are largely independent, local operations geared to 
merchandising and public service. They're hiring more proficient 
disk jockeys, watching copy carefully, studying their markets so 
they can better sell them, hiring more Negroes for non-air work 



legro radio, more than any other 
medium is reaching the nation's 18 
million Negroes. 

Why does its coverage extend more 
broadly and deeply into the Negro 
community than Negro newspapers 
and magazines? Because there are 
568 radio stations carrying programing 
designed specifically for Negro appeal. 
And there are 50 major stations which 
program only for the Negro popula- 
tion they serve. 

This coverage of radio has depth as 
well as breadth. Depth comes in such 
tangibles as popular Negro personal- 
ities and programing Negroes like. 
More intangibly, stations gain a depth 
and penetration because every year 
they're tending more toward identifi- 
cation with the Negro community. 

They're staging public service pro- 
grams. They sponsor baseball teams, 
help raise funds for Negro or inter- 
racial hospitals, transport handicapped 
Negro children to schools, help legis- 
late local reforms in Negro neighbor- 
hoods. 

If a station shows it's on the Negro 
listener's "team" — on his side in terms 
of treating him as a human being with 
certain desires and ambitions — that 
station establishes identity for itself 
with its listeners. There are two cor- 
ollaries to this identification in which 
every national, regional and local ad- 
vertiser is interested. Identification 
with the station is transferred to the 
station's clients and this transferral re- 
sults in more sales. 

Survey findings: In this >ixth an- 



nual Negro market issue, sponsor 
queried Negro-appeal radio stations on 
many phases of their programing and 
operating. The detailed results are in 
charts elsewhere in this issue. 

Here are some of the general find- 
ings. 

Thirty-four per cent of the stations 
answering sponsor's questionnaire 
I 190 in all I are part of a multiple sta- 
tion group. The number of groups is 
increasing and the number of groups 
devoting ever more hours to Negro- 
appeal programs is on the rise. There 
are 34 group operations which include 
one or more Negro stations. Some 
groups, of course, are far bigger and 
have a much wider range of activity 
and coverage than others. 

Keystone's Negro network: The 

biggest single group of Negro-appeal 
stations is in the Keystone Broadcast- 
ing System lineup. Keystone, which 
headquarters in Chicago, just an- 
nounced the affiliation of its 1,000th 
station — and of this number 347 carry 
programing directed to the Negro 
listener. 

KBS reports its Negro-appeal sta- 
tions are located in 26 stations. In the 
South, where there is a concentration 
of Negro people. KBS stations cover 
87% of the 10.725.591 persons in the 
area. In terms of total Negro popula- 
tion in the U. S. — some 18 million — 
Keystone covers almost 10 million of 
these or 50' , . 

KBS has operated its transcription 
network ot Negro stations for the past 
two years, during which time its affili- 



ated Negro-appeal stations has grown 
by 20%. 

Station profile: The average station 
programing to Negroes is a non-power 
independent which has been on the 
air between eight and 15 years and 
carries less than 30 hours a week of 
Negro-appeal shows. 

Analysis of the questionnaires re- 
turned to sponsor shows: 

► Power: 30% of the stations are 250 
watters; 2%, 500 watts; 34%, 1 lew; 
20%, 5 kw; 10%, 10 kw and 4% 50 
kw in power. 

► Years on air: 36% of the stations 
responding have been on the air less 
than eight years; 44%. from 8 to 15 
years; 9% from 16 to 20 years and 
11% more than 21 years. 

► Negro programing: 23% of the 
stations program 100 r ; for Negroes; 
63% less than 30 hours a week; 9%, 
from 30 to 60 hours weekly: 5%. from 
60 to 100 hours weekly but not totally. 

► tXegro employees: There's a marked 
tendency for stations to hire more Ne- 
groes. It's been standard practice for 
stations to employ Negro personalities 
as talent but in recent \ears more sta- 
tions are hiring Negroes for opera- 
tive and sales jobs. Some 60% of the 
stations hire Negroes. 

► Merchandising: An increasing 
number of clients and agencies want 
merchandising services w ith all media 
Inns but they're particular!) interested 
in getting in-store merchandising and 
personal appearances within the Negro 
market. ()nl\ .">' , of the Negro-appeal 
stations do not offer merchandising 



In 



sponsor \i.<;ro issue 



28 SEPTEMBER 1957 



-■•i \ ices. 

► I /filiation: U)OUl one in Foui Ne- 
gro-appeal stations is affiliated with a 
network T.'>'« are independent, -7'< 
arc network-affiliated. 

\\ bal <!" these stations program? I!\ 
1,11 the l'ulk of their Negro-appeal pro- 
graming is devoted i<> di>k jockeys \n I i « • 
handle ;i variet) i»f music types 
rhythm and blues, jazz, Negro lulk 
1 1 1 11 - i < ■ . rock n roll and, verj popular 
in the Negro community, spirituals 
and gospel music. There arc ol course, 
smatterings of variety, sports, news, 



homemaking and relig ion. I he pr "• 
portions \ai\ according i" local tastes 
ami customs. 

Disk jockej selling! Bui bj and 
lai ge in. »~i ol the pi ogram is wil li a 
ili-k jockey. He's the big salesman in 
ihi- market ili«- one who aims most 
directl) al the Negro purchasing powei 
nf some SI 5 billion a j eat . 

Robei t P. 1 icathei w I "I Sej mour, 

Leatherwood and Cleveland agency in 
I lei roil has some aJ\ ice foi the stal ion 
manager who hires Negro <li-k jock- 
ej - and l"i the client w li i sponsoi - 



him. 

Some do s 

• Use i ommer< ials « hit li are en- 
thusiastii - Swing) tunes and i atch) 
jingles are advantageous because the) 
mail li the pai ■■ ol the <l] « show . 

• ln|i 1 1 as mui li humoi as possible 
in mi ..nil il < oromen ials. B) doing 
tlii-. the sponsoi i- contributing to the 
happiness thai the d.j.'s listeners are 
seeking. 

• Give the d.j. pei mission to elab- 
oi li. mi the commercial message. His 

i Please turn t<> /"/.<• I.': 



Harry Bclafonte ' r - » and Mahalia Jackson, -tars on a WB] I 
Chicago, interview, are outstanding!} successful arti-i- with anj 
listening group. The) symbolize the Negro's interest in Negro 
performers as well as bis respect foi great iiiM~ir.il talent 




Fans and performers a < ^JI.D. Homewood, Ma., include 
vocalist \ ii ii Cole (front, c.) ami station announcer Jesse 
Champion. Stations encourage persona] identification with per- 
formers and station itself to enhance listener loyalty, brand loyalty 





Flash and verve of di-k j... k.-%- show up in their dress, 
as with ilii- W 1 1 'i . Pittsburgh, performer, as well a- in 
ili.-ir air manner. Vudiencea like the color and drai 
the d.j.'s speech and mannerisms; likr to see him in - 




| 

Comn 

a- Wli 
V. Wli 

- 



lunity participation ith -nr 

\l. Philadelphia*! - ilk Interne* with d.j. T. 
itfield. Negi community i- tighter than whit 

phical limitation- within rrntral area 




Mississippi's 


\ A • ! 4* m 


1st 

Market 


• The NATION'S HIGHEST Hooper-rated Ne- 
gro station 

• Mississippi's ONLY Negro station in Jack- 
son — 48% Negro 

• Top-rated consistently by Hooper - Pulse 
- O'Connor 

• Used by more advertisers than any other 
Mississippi station 

• The ONLY way to the 107,000 Negroes 
of the Jackson Metropolitan Area (Hinds- 
Rankin-Madison Counties -. U. S. Cen- 
sus — Sales Management) 




Arkansas' 



1st 



Market 



Arkansas' ONLY Negro station 

In Little Rock — the 88th Market — 33% 
Negro 

Top-rated consistently by Hooper-O'Con- 



The ONLY way to the 114,000 Negroes 
of the Little Rock-Pine Bluff Metropolitan 
Area (Pulaski - Jefferson - Lonoke Coun- 
ties U. S. Census — Sales Man- 
agement) 



Sell 

SHREVEPORT 


Lc 


>uisiana's 

2nd 

Market 




KANV 

• The Ark-La-Tex ONLY Negro station 

• In Shreveport - the 89th Market — 39% 
Negro 

• Top Hooper-rated consistently 

• The ONLY way to the 108,000 Negroes 
of the Shreveport Metropolitan Area 

(Caddo - Bossier - DeSoto Parishes U. 

S. Census — Sales Management) 





The ( 




S-bartior^S 


f\/lGl endon 1 J I A J k La M 






Represented Nationally by the Jo 


hn E. Pearson Co. 



L2 



SPONSOR NEGRO ISSUE • 28 SEPTEMBER 1957 



5. NEGRO POPULATION BASICS 



Non-white population :i- of I July, I *>.">(>. I>\ age 



Age 


Total non-white population 


Non-white male 


Non-«»hite female 


Totol U S. 168,091,000 


18,268,000 


8,930,000 


9,338,000 


L-9 


7,427,000 


3,724,000 


03,000 


lull 


1,668,000 


83 ,,ooo 


ooo 


15-19 


1,446,000 


722,000 


723,000 


20-29 


3,609,000 


1,253,000 


1. 157 000 


;n|M 


4,626,000 


2,188,000 


2,4 18,000 


50-69 


2,411,000 


1,187,000 


1,225,000 


70 ;itnl over 


613,000 


291.(» m 


222,1 


s.>ur, ,■ o s Departnui 


unerci Current F P-Sfl 


?0 1 u 











iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii;. liiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiliiiiiiliiiiiiiiiuii [iii!!ii„.;i:;cK;::;!! ■'■; f ' : !ir..."i™i 

Changes in non-white population since 1950. in selected U. S. 
cities having 5. 000 or more non-white persons 





Special census 
date 


°o increase 
total pop. 
1950-date 




Non-white 


population 




Locality 


°o increase 
1950-date 


°o increase 
1940-50 


Current 


°o of 
total 


ALABAMA 














Dotlian 


5 19 56 


33.5 


14.6 


n. a.* 




29.1 


Ilunt-ville 


2/4/56 


91.5 


34.9 


n. a. 


7.H81 


22.5 


Mobile 


7 18 56 


34.8 


14.2 


57.7 


,20 


30.1 


St'lma 


8 27 56 


20.7 


7.9 


n. a. 


l 1,612 


49.3 


ARIZONA 














Phoenix 


3 11 53 


20.6 


59.4 


31. 1 


102557 


8.2 


ARKANSAS 














Rlytheville 


2 28 56 


9.7 


0.6 


n. a. 


5,004 


28.1 


North little Rock 


7 21 54 


12.:. 


10.6 


d. a. 


12.126 


24 5 


Pine Bluff 


8 8 56 


7.1 


-4.0 


n. a. 


1525! 


39.3 


Texarkana 


1 21 56 


24.3 


24.1 


n. a. 


5,567 


28.2 


West Memphis 


11 15/55 


73.1 


41.6 


n. a. 


7.172 


45.5 


We~t Memphis 


12 8 5 ; 


33.3 


15.1 


D. a. 




48.0 


CALIFORNIA 














Alameda 


3 11 54 


9.6 


6.5 






9.5 


Compton 




12.7 


374.9 


n. a. 


10.871 


17.1 


Fresno 


8 9 54 


17.7 


28.7 


93.6 


9,149 


8.5 


Los Angeles 


2 25 56 


13.9 


47.3 


llh.2 


311.396 


13.8 



H * n. a. — not available. 



iiiwiimiHiiiiiiiiiiiii iuiiii lint ; 






SPONSOR NEGRO ISSL E • 28 SEPTEMBER 1957 



13 



KING SIZE Personalities 

for a KING SIZE market 







4 top-rated Carolina Kings rule the 
Carolina Negro market exclusively . . 
a major market that represents more than 
half of all the people in the area. 
799,287 Negroes believe in these men 
. . . buy the products they advertise. 

To reach this major Carolina market, 
let these Carolina Kings sell your product 
to the people who swear by them. 

AUDIENCE WOIC WPAL 

Total population.. 827,900 793,300 

Negro population .... 384,973 414,314 

Farm population 253,100 254,400 

No. Households... 198,300 217,790 

Radio Homes 187,950 201,748 

Data Sources: Population, Bureau of Census, 1952, 
Farm Households, Consumer Markets, 1955. 



TOTAL 

1,621,200 
799,287 
507,500 
416,090 
389,698 

Radio Homes, 




^ Reverend William McKinley Bowman, Radio veteran 
of 14 years, has a Pulse average of 5.6 on WOIC for 
"Spiritual Parade" and "Old Ship of Zion." 

A Jimmy Carter, witty M.C., averages 5.5 for four hours 
and fifteen minutes of fast paced daily broadcasting 
on WOIC. 

<$> Bob Nichols, South Carolina's first Negro D.J., has 8 
years experience at WPAL. He averages 7.9 for his 
weekday 2 to 5:30 afternoon show. 

y Reverend Emmett Lampkin, consistent leader in 
popularity, averages 8.8 for his morning and evening 
inspirational programs on WPAL. 

Figures from Pulse 
Aug. 1956 for WOIC— June 1957 for WPAL 



/-ft GOIDEN HORN STATIONS 

SPEIDEL-FISHER 

yiy BROADCASTING CORPORATION 



WOIC 

COLUMBIA, S. C. 1470 KC 5000 W 



WPAL 

CHARLESTON, S. C. 730 KC 1000 W 



National Representative: Walker Representation Co., Inc. 
Southeastern Representative: Dora-Clayton Agency 



1 1 



M'ONSOR NEGRO ISSUE 



28 SEPTEMBER 1957 



5. NEGRO POPULATION BASICS 



i ontinued 












' n. ». — not avalljM. 

Source: The Hon M Kendrli organization. Washington. D. C. July. 1957. Based on Bureau of Census. Current rooulatlm BeporU. 





Special census 
date 


°o increase 
total pop. 
1950 ttoti 




Non whiti 


population 




Locality 


°o Inci 

1950 date 


°o increase 
1940-50 


Current 


%of 

total 


1 o« Angeles 


9 26 


6.8 


20.6 


116.2 


254 


12.2 


Sacramento 


8 1') 55 


I l. 1 


49.5 






10.2 


1 — .tii Bernardino 


1 L9 ■'• 


11.9 


149.1 






6.4 


^.in Diego 


3/30/57 


,7.8 


83.2 






6 8 


— -ail Diego 


1 l , 12 


30.] 


30.2 


187.2 




5 5 


Stoi k 


1! 27 54 


6.1 


32.6 


i 1.7 




12.9 


FLORIDA 














l>.i\ ( ounrj 


1 II 57 


36.6 


24.2 


n. a.* 




15 3 


Broward ( it\ 


1 7/55 


89.5 


68.4 


ii. .i. 




22 6 


Dade < lounrj 


in _•: 55 


12.2 


50.8 


M 1 


.'il 


14 


Ft. Lauderdale 


4/7/55 


73.2 


63.0 


ii. a. 


1 ;:■ 


22.1 


Leon Count] 


1 27 55 


11.7 


7.9 


n. a. 


21 9 


37.1 


Palm Beach < lounry 


1 1 55 


37.0 


22.8 


n. a. 


12 


27.2 


Panama < itj 


1 11 57 


24.3 


23.4 


n. a. 




21.9 


Pensacola 


K) 25 56 


17.2 


12.3 


n. a. 


17 ■ 


34.8 


Tallahassee t lit] 


1 27/55 


39.9 


53.5 


n. .1. 


1 1. 192 


37.8 


W esl Palm Beach 1 itj 


1 1 55 


18.2 


-1.3 


n. a. 


12.' 


24.8 


ILLINOIS 














Evanston 


1 21 55 


1.8 


9.8 


17.1 


7,832 


10.5 


INDIANA 














Ulen Count; 


11 9 56 


18.1 


81.7 


n. a. 


9,751 


4 5 


1 i. \\ ayne 1 itj 


1 1 9 56 


8.4 


82.4 


109.0 


''.'.M 


6.7 


( ..ir\ 


8 18/56 


26. 1 


81.5 


92.1 


60,987 


36.1 


NEVADA 














1 as \ egas 


1 1 55 


81.9 


108.6 


n. a. 




13.4 






Growth of Negro 
population in 17 
metropolitan 
areas since 1940 



City 



lllllllliilll 
1940 






1950 



1955 



Source: Ebony Magazine. Jur • 



r 



Per cent increase 
1940-1955 



1. New York \. E. 
\i'u Jersey 


654,155 


1,045,512 


1,200,000 




2. ( hicago 


324,102 


605,346 


842,850 


L6(] 


3. Philadelphia 


115,04] 


184,644 


600,090 




4. \\ ash ngton, D. 1 . 


213,783 


3 17,757 


443,360 




5. Detroit 


169,892 


357,800 


418,713 




6. Los tngeles 


75^23 


276,305 


337,300 




7. Baltimore 


187.11') 


266,661 


305,042 


' 


8. Birmingham 


169,7 15 


715 


240,840 




9. St 1 ouis 


1 19,429 


215336 


236,697 




10. Memphis 


1 10.061 




229,257 




11. \.u Orleans 


1 56, 188 


199327 


217,919 




12. Cleveland 


86.95 1 


154,117 


207,000 




13. Vtlai 


12'*. 157 


165,591 


206,880 




14. San Francisco-Oakland 


19.7' 


1 17.22 i 


184,028 




15. Pittsburgh 


115,02 


1 ',7.2m 


157,000 




16. Houston 


100,945 


! 19,286 


156,000 




17. Norfolk-Ports 


108.167 


122.833 


143,527 


33 






SPONSOR NKGRO ISSUE 



2;'. SEPTEMBER 1957 



15 



Sell . . . 




GROUP DISCOUNT PLAN 

2 stations 5% discount off earned rate 

3 " 10% 

4 " 15% 

5 " 20% 

6 " 25% " " " ' 

National Representatives: Negro Stations Representative National Sates Manager 
-.-•■ „ , in the Southeast: John Fulton 

Gill-Perna Inc. Home Offices 

New York 21, N. Y. Dora-C layton Agency p ea chtree at Mathieson 

Atlanta, Ga. Atlanta, Georgia 



Cincinnati, Ohio, 1000 W, 1480 KC. Cincinnati's 
only All Negro Programmed Station. 



WLOU 



Louisville, Kentucky, 1000 W, 1350 KC. Louis- 
ville's only All Negro Programmed Station. 



WOBS 



Jacksonville, Florida, 5000 W, 1360 KC. Jack- 
sonville's only All Negro Programmed Station. 



Miami Beach, Florida, 1000 W, 800 KC. South 
Florida's most powerful All Negro Programmed 
Station. 



WSOK 



Nashville, Tenn., 1000 W, 1470 KC. Nashville's 
only All Negro Programmed Station. 



\ 



WIOK 



Tampa, Florida, 1000 W, 1150 KC. Tampa's 
only All Negro Programmed Station. 



** 




WMRY 



New Orleans, La., 1000 W, 600 KC. New Or- 
V, leans' only All Negro Programmed Station. 



*SaIe subject to FCC approval 



•Purchase subject to FCC approval 



L6 



SPONSOR NEGRO ISSUE • 28 SEPTEMBER 1957 



6. NAT'L ADVERTISERS 

These are the leading national advertiser! buying Nemo ippeal 
Radio. The) include 156 companie§ listed in the order of the 
most numerous mentions received from radio stations answer- 
ing SPONSOR'S Negro markets questionnaire. 

Stations were asked to list their 10 top national advertisers in 
term- of dollar billing. An analysis of the t>p<* of advertisers 
ami their products appear- in the igenc) Analysis on page 6. 

Biggest advertisers are still the cigarettes, beers ami specialized 
Negro products, but more general-appeal advertisers are moi in-: 

into Negro radio. Ui^^est breakthrough is in foods. 



Strickland I. & Co. — Royal Crown hair drrssinq 

Carnation Co 

Chattanooga Mrdlcmr Co — SSS tonic 

Pat Milk Co. 

Wrlgley. Wm Jr Co 

Brown & Williamson Tobacco Co. — Tube Rose snufl 

Anheuser Busch. Inc — Budweiser beer 

Reynolds. R. J. Tobacco Co. — Camel cigarettes 

Reynolds. R. J. Tobacco Co. — Winston eigarrttt. 

American Tobacco Co — Lucky Strike cigarettes 

B. C. Remedy Co. — B.C. headache remedy 

Chattanooga Medicine Co. — Black Draught 

Household Products. Inc. — Sulfur-K 

Montirrllo Drug Co. — "666" cold preparation 

Maine Sardinr Industry — Maine sardines 

Coca-Cola Co 

Chattanooga Medicine Co. — Cardui 

American Tobacco Co — Hit Parade cigarettes 

Pepsi Cola Co. 

Stanback Co.. Ltd — Stanbaek headache powder 

Keystone Labs.. Inc. — Long-Aid hair dressing 

Lander Co.. Inc. — Dixie Peach 

Chesebrough. Pond's. Inc. — Vaseline 

Union Pharmaceutical Co.. Inc — Artra Skin Tone cre?m 

American Tobacco Co. — Pall Mall cigarettes 

Household Products. Inc. — Gloss-8 

Chattanooga Medicine Co. — Soltlce 

Armour \ Co. — Armour Star lard 

Clerex Chemical Co. — Clorox 

Ford Motor Co. 

Italian Swiss Colony — wine 

Nehl Corp. — Royal Crown cola 

Sinclair Refining Co. 

Brown 4 Williamson Tobacco Corp. — Viceroy Cigarettes 

Miller Brewing Co. — Miller Hi-Llfe beer 

Quaker Oats Co — Aunt Jemima pancake 4 buckwheat 

flours 
Strickland. J. & Co. — White Rose petroleum jelly 
Tetley Tea Co. 

Carllng Brewing Co. — Stag beer 
Croomulsion. Co — Creomutsion 
Esso Standard Oil Co — Esso 
Grove Labs.. Inc. — Bromo Quinine cold tablets 
General Foods Corp — Calumet baking powd r 
National Toilet Co. — Nadinola 
Schlitz Jos. Brewing Co. — Schlltz beer 
Strickland. J. & Co. — Silky Strate 
Berjen Co. — Pep-Ti-Kon 
Berjen Co — Act-On 

Beech-Nut Life Savers. Inc. — Beech-Nut gum 
Browne. E. T. Drug Co.. Inc. — Palmer's Skin Success 
Carllng Brewing Co. — Carting's ale 
Continental Baking Co. Inc. — Wonder bread 
General Mills. Inc. — Gold Medal flour 
Grove Labs.. Inc— 4- Way cold tablets 
General Foods Corp.. Jell- division — Jell-0 instant 

pudding 
Kroger Co. 

Pinkham. Lydia E. Medicine Co. 
Pharmaco. Inc. — Feen-A-MInt 
Reynolds. R. J. Tobacco Co. — Salem cigarettes 
Remington Rand Div. of Sperry Rand Corp. — Remington 

Rand typewriters 
Roily. Wm. B. & Co.. Inc. — Luzianne coffee 
Shell Oil Co. 
Ward Baking Co. 
Burger Brewing Co. — Burger beer 
Borden Food Products Co. 
Bristol-Myers Co. — Bufferin 
Bristol-Myers Co — Sal Hepatica 
Chattanooga Medicine Co. — Velvo 
Chattanooga Medicine Co. — Zyrone 
Continental Baking Co.. Inc. — Hostess cup cakes 
Double Cola Co. 

Falstaff Brewing Corp. — Falstaff beer 
Folger. J. A. 4 Co. — Folger's coffee 
Geetz. M. K Brewing Co. — Country Club Malt Liguor 
Helme. Geo. W. Co — Honey Bee snuff 
International Milling Co. — Robin Hood flour 
Plough. Inc. — B!ack & White beauty preparations 
Plough. Inc. — St. Joseph aspirin 
Pearl Brewing Co. — Pearl beer 



Sealtest Div. National Dairy Products Corp — Sraltrst 
ice cream 

Texas Co — Texaco Sky Chief gasoline 

American Tabocco Co. — Herbert Tareyton eigarrtt. s 

American Home Magazine Corp — American Home 

Atlanta Life Insurance Co. 

Atlantic Refining Co. 

Analmt Co. Inc— Anahlst 

Albers Milling Co. 

American Sugar Refining Co.— Domino sugar 

Berjon Co — Ka-Don 

Blatz Brewing Co.— Blatz beer 

Burton-Dixie Corp — Burton-Dlxle mattretwt 

Carter Products. Inc. — ArTld 

Clark Oil Refining Co. 

Colgate-Palmolive Co.— Brisk toothpaste 

Colgate-Palmolive Co. — Super Suds 

Cole. H C Milling Co. 

Canfleld. A. J. Co.— Canfleld beverages 

Canada Dry Ginger Ale. Inc.— Canada Dry gingerale 

Canepa. John B. Co —Red Cross spaghetti 

Chemway Corp — Larvex 

Dr. Pepper Co. 

Dro. Inc. — Dro 

Dulaney. John H. 4 Son. Inc. 

Ex-Lax. Inc.— Ex-Lax 

Eskimo Pie Corp.— Eskimo Pie 

Falls City Brewing Co.— Falls City beer 

Goodyear Tire 4 Rubber Co. Inc 

Goodrich. B. F. Co. 

General Motors Corp —Chevrolet and Oldsmoblle 

Gallo. E. J. Winery— Gallo wine 

Great Atlantic & Pacific Tea Co— A 4 P store* 

Gillette Safety Razor Co. 

Hercules Powder Co — Toxaphene 

Hires. Charles 4 Co— Hires root beer 

Hood Chemical Co.. Inc. 

Interstate Bakeries Corp.— Butternut bread 

Johnson Publishing Co.. Inc.— Jet magazine 

Kellogg Co. 

Lever Brothers Co. — Breeze 

L.vcr Brothers Co— Silver Dust 

Liggett & Myers Tobacco Co. 

Liebmann Breweries. Inc — Rheingold beer 

McCormlck Co. — MeCormick's tea 

Motorola. Inc 

National Brewing Co. 

National Brewing Co. of Michigan— National Bohemian 
beer 

Norwich Pharmacal Co — Pepto- Bismol 

National Biscuit Co— Millbrook bread 

Oertel Brewing Co. — beer 

Pabst Brewing Co.— Pabst Blue Ribbon beer 

Procter & Gamble Co 

Plymouth Motor Div. of Chrysler Corp 

Perma-Strate Co.. Inc.— Perma-Strate 

Pharma-Craft Corp . Inc.— Celdene 

Reynolds. R J. Tobacco Co —Prince Albert pipe tobacco 

Radio Corp. of America — appliances 

Rath Packing Co. 

Ritchie. Harold F. Inc —Scott's Emulsion 

Ritchie. Harold F.. Inc.— Brylereem 

Rexall Drug Co. 

Rigo Chemical Co— Kill-Ko 

Ralston Purina Co. Feed Dn 

Roma Winerirs. Inc — Roma wine 

Sears. Roebuck & Co. 

Sterling Drug Co.. National Brands Oiv— Bayer aspirin 

Savannah Sugar Refining Corp— Dixie Crystal sugar 

Sterling Brewers. Inc. — Sterling beer 

Sp.rry 4 Hutchinson Co — S 4 H Green Stamps 

Sun Oil Co. 

Swift 4 Co. 

Sardeau. Inc — Sardo 

Sessions Co. Inc — Sessions peanut butter 

U S. Tobacco Co. — Bruton snuff 

Westgate-California Tuna Canning Co —Breast 0' Chick- 
en tuna 

Wllen Brothers. Inc — wines 

Weston Biscuit Co.. Inc. 

Wildroot Co Inc — Vam 

Wesson Oil 4 Snowdrift Sales Co. — Snowdrift 




SPONSOR 



Hundreds of extra c\es to be 
exact — the most restless 
retinue of retinas — work for 
you at SPONSOR to help keep 
you the best informed executive 
on broadcasting that you can 
possibly be. 

Experienced eyes that 

beneath the surface and beyond 
the fact. Eyes that bring you 
not alone news but the most 
comprehensive analysis of this 
news in the entire publication 
field. 

That's why you should read 
SPONSOR — at home . . . 
where you can give it your 
unhurried time — your relaxed 
imagination. One idea that 
you can apply might well be 
worth a lifetime of subscriptions. 

— for less than a penny 
a day — just $3.00 a year — 
you can have 52 issues of 
SPOS'SOR delivered to your 
home. Try it on this 
money back guarantee. 



SPONSOR 

40 East 49 St, New York 17, N. Y. 

I'll take o year's subscription of SPONSOR. 
You guarantee full refund any time I'm 
not satisfied. 

NAME 

FIRM 



ADDRESS. 

n Bin 



SPONSOR NF.GRO ISSUE • 28 SEPTEMBER 1957 



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NOTHING TO COMPARE 



WITH 




IN 



COLUMBUS, GEORGIA 



THE ONLY ALL-NEGRO PROGRAMMED STATION IN THE AREA 



PROOF 



PULSE 


NECRO 


SURVEY 




Ma 


■ch-April 


1957 




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. . . yes PULSE proves WCLS is the dominent choice of Negro 
listeners by a landslide ALL HOURS OF THE DAY . . . EVERY 
PERIOD SURVEYED . . . INCLUDINC SUNDAY!!! 

100% NEGRO PROGRAMMED 

ir Exclusive Appeal 

it Proven Sales Power 

•jf Big Responsive Audience 

. . . serving 200,000 Negroes in counties with average percentage of 
Negro population 



1,000 WATTS 




Clear Channel 
1580 KC 



MUSCOGEE BROADCASTING CO., INC 

P.O. BOX 887 

Charlie H. Parish, General Manager 

EXCLUSIVE REPRESENTATION 
DORA-CLAYTON AGENCY— Southeost 
Atlanta 

And announcing the appointment of 

THE WALKER REPRESENTATION COMPANY — National 

New York, Chicago, Boston, Los Angeles, San Francisco 



SPONSOR NEGRO ISSUE • 28 SEPTEMBER 1 95 . 



21 





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During the past 10 years advertisers and their 
agencies have spent billions oi dollars on air. A lot 
of people lived on it. A lot of goods were moved. 

To those who live on air SPONSOR serves a function 
no other publication can match, for SPONSOR is 
the most definitive studs of air in the broadcast in- 
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air — delivered to you even week — 52 weeks a year. 



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and earn its salt are just much too important for 
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Most every man who's gotten anywhere in air reads 
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istry of broadcasting— the factors that make it move 



SPONSOR 

THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE TV/RADIO ADVERTISERS USE 



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what's in a name . . . 



f\ lot — with all iluc deference to the Bard. Advertising Mas proved it. 

More important — it obtains lor people, too. You make 
your own "brand name" bj how you think and what you do. And this 
very "product image" will determine how much cake you have in 
this vale of tears. 

That's why — if you're in the broadcast held. SPONSOR is 
"A MUST" to receive and read. 

SPONSOR is so necessary because of the singular, definitive 

contributions it makes to an industry that requires not alone tacts. 

but a penetrating comprehension of the factors motivating the multiplicity of 

talents it employs. ITS THE ONE MAGAZINE 

RADIO AND TV ADVERTISERS REALLY USE. And the need 

for SPONSOR grows each day. It is an ever more important information center — 

an ever larger library of ideas — the compilation of the finished and the 

planned creative energies that spark the air thinking of the da\ 

To get the most out of SPONSOR, it should be read— AT HOME. It is 

too rich in valuable material for a quick perusal on a 

routing list. Nor does it serve its fullest function that waj for you, because it is a 

publication with the kind of stuff you want to 

cut away and file — a magazine of ideas that will generate ideas in you — 

make you more valuable to yourself and others. It will bring you closer to 

the "product image" you would like your 

name to be. 



For only S.1.00 a year — ?2 issues of the 
most useful publication in the broadcast field 
will he delivered to your horn, • than 

a penny a day u hat better time bit 
make as an investment in your fui 



SPONSOR 



THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE TV/RADIO ADVERTISERS USE 



8. NEGRO RADIO STATIONS 



# 



100% Negro-appeal 
radio stations 



NORTH CAROLINA 

CITY CALL LETTERS 



INDIANA 



1)1 RIIA 1/ 

WSTON-S iLEM 



WSRC 
WAAA 



ALABAMA 



OHIO 



CITY 



CALL LETTERS CINCINNATI 



II (l\ 



BESSEMER 


. ..WBCO 


BIRMIMII IM 
MORII E 


WEDR 

WJLD 

WMOZ 


MONTGOMI R] 


WRM 1 


ARKANSAS 




LITTLE ROCK 


KOKY 


CALIFORNIA 




SAN FRA.\< 1S< . . ... 


.... ..KSAN 


t 


KSAY 


DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 


WASHINGTON 


WOOK 


(Bethesda) WUST 


FLORIDA 




JACKSONVILLE 


WOBS 


MIAMI 


WFEC 


MIAMI BEACH . ... 

TAMPA 


.WMBM 

WIOK 


GEORGIA 




ATLANTA 


WAOK 


COLUMBUS 


WERD 
WCLS 


ILLINOIS 




HARVEY (Chicago) _< 


WBEE 


KENTUCKY 




LOUISVILLE 


WLOU 


LOUISIANA 




BATON ROUGE 


WXOK 


NEW ORLEANS 


WBOK 


SHREVEPORT 


WMRY 
KAM 


MARYLAND 




ANNAPOLIS 


WANN 


BALTIMORE .. . 


WEBB 




WS1D 


MICHIGAN 




INKSTF.R (Detroit) 


WCHB 


MISSISSIPPI 




JACKSON . 


WOKJ 


MISSOURI 




KANSAS CITY ... 


KPRS 


ST LOTUS 


KATZ 




KXLW 


NEW JERSEY 




NEWARK (New York 1 


WNJR 



PENNSYLVANIA 

I'HILADELPHIA WDAS 

WHAT 

SOUTH CAROLINA 

CHARLESTON WPAL 

COLUMBIA WOK. 

TENNESSEE 

CHATTANOOGA W\IFS 

JACKSON WJAK 

MEMPHIS WDIA 

WLOK 
NASHVILLE WSOK 



TEXAS 



BEAUMONT 
FORT WORTH 
HOUSTON 



VIRGINIA 

NEWPORT NEWS 

NORFOLK 



RICHMOND 



KJET 
KNOK 
KCOH 
KYOK 



WYOU 
WRAP 
WANT 



Stations with 30-plus 

Negro-appeal hours 

per week 

(but not 100%) 
ALABAMA 

CITY CALL LETTERS HOURS 

TALLADEGA WHTB .. ...60 

ARKANSAS 



HELENA 



KFFA 42 



CALIFORNIA 

LONG BEACH KFOX 49 

LOS ANGELES KGFJ 59 

OAKLAND KWBR . .103 

FLORIDA 

JACKSONVILLE WRHC 50 

MILTON _ WEBY 86 



GEORGIA 



ALBANY 

AUGUSTA 
BAIN BRIDGE . 
MACON 



S II l\\ III 



WJAZ 34 

.WAUG VI 

WMGR 31 

WBML 43 

WIBB 32 

WJIV \1 



ILLINOIS 



CHICAGO WGES 67 

LA GRANGE WTAQ .. 30 

OAK PARK WOP A 49 

•Burt on SPONSOR*! !• " Buyers C.uide and amplified by SPONSOR'S sixth annual Negro Maiket questionnaire, 
the opportunity to reply to this questionnaire. 



CALL LETTERS HOURS 



GARY 

HAMMOND 

INDIANAPOLIS 



WWCA ... 
WJOB ... 
WGEE ... 



LOUISIANA 

NATCHITOCHES .... _KNOC 

MICHIGAN 

DETROIT WJLB 

MISSISSIPPI 



CLARKSDALE WROX 

GREENVILLE WGVM 



MISSOURI 

SIKESTON ! KSIM 

NEW JERS-Y 

CAMDEN „___rc/n/ 

NEW YORK 

HI FFALO —WKBW 

NEW YORK WLIB 

WOl 
WWRL 

NORTH CAROLINA 

CHARLOTTE WGIV 

NEW BERN WOOW 

OHIO 

CLEVELAND WJMO 

DAYTON WING ... 



OKLAHOMA 

OKLAHOMA CITY KLPR 

PENNSYLVANIA 

PITTSBURGH WILY . 



33 
32 
34 



30 



53 



32 
42 



80 



71 



35 
75 
81 
52 



42 

35 



71 
30 



SOUTH CAROLINA 

CHARLESTON WQSN ... 



34 



93 



56 



TENNESSEE 

NASHVILLE Wl.AC 


.... 33 


TEXAS 

BAYTOWN KREL 


.... 63 


TEXAS CITY KTLW . 

VIRGINIA 

NORFOLK ... WLOW . 


30 

.. - 42 



Stations with less than 

30 Negro-appeal hours 

per week 





ALABAMA 




ALEXANDER 


CITY _ 


.....WRFS _ 


_ 10 


ANDALUSIA 




WCTA 


„. 3 


ANNISTON _ 




.....WHMA 


3 






WSPC .... 


5 


ATHENS 




WJMW 


3 


AUBURN 




WAUD 


26 



All 568 Netro stations lilted in the Buyers' Guide had 



28 



SPONSOR NEGRO ISSUE 



28 SEPTEMBER 1957 



CALL LETTERS HOUHS 



GEORGIA 



BIRMIM.II M/ 

HI i I II R 

IX) I II t\ 



El i ii I I 
FAYETTl 
FLOM ll<>\ 
FLORl V( / 

i, tDSDl \ 



CENl i I 
■GRF.EW II 1 1 
II IMII lo\ 
HOME WOOD 

HI \/M 11 IE 

If tRloX 
MO HI 1 1 
MONROEl II 1 1 
MONTGOMERY 

Ml S( // SHOALS 

OPl UK l 

OPP 



S^ o'TTSBORO 

SEl M I 

SYl U U G I 



TA1.LASSEE 
THOMAS) II 1 1 

Tl si ALOOSA 
II St I MBIA 
U I ST POINT 



CALL LETTERS HOUHS 

ZjTAFI 2 

I! I Ok 2 

tt til IK 
WHOS 
li MSI 

\i nit, 9 

WOOl 7 

mil : 

li 11 ll F 3 

ii It It 6 

It JOI 7 

noil i 13 

If//" 10 

rc^D 7 

pgi i 7 

rcyi 6 

9 ERII l 

/////; in 

ii mir i 

mi \ 6 

WJIM \<< 

II Kill \2 

ll MFC 6 

ll tl'\ 3 

IK til 9 

m t) 3 

ttJHO 5 

r.n// 2 

/rr«/ i 

ircr( 29 

tf //"/?/? 5 

ITFjBB 3 

WMLS 6 

/rrz,5 6 

WJDB 6 

JT'.VPr _ 5 

/M \ I II 

V «/./) 8 



Ml s I 



4R/Z0N>\ 

AJ7T/. 



ARKANSAS 

ARKADELPHIA _ KF/tC 

CROSSETT K/1G// 

££ DORADO KDMS 

FAYETTEVILLE KG7?/7 

FORREST CITY KXJK 

FORT SMITH KFPW 

HOT SPRINGS KKI/s 

KBLO 

KttFC 
JO\ESBORO KBTM 

LITTLE ROCK KTHS 

MAGNOLIA KXI.R 

M 1/ I 
V U.l ERN KROK 

McGEHEE KVSA 

NEWPORT _ KNBY 

PINE RLl FF KCLA 

KOT\ 
Tl XARKANA RTFS 

WARREN KWRF 



28 

11 

in 

3 

6 

3 

9 

18 

6 

',- 

5 

18 

a 

3 

6 

5 

12 

IK 
3 
3 



CALIFORNIA 



1! IKFRSF1F1D 


K IFY 


12 




KMAP 


14 


.BERKELEY 


KRE ... . 


8 


BLYTHE 


KYOR 


1 


BVRBANK 


KBLA . 


5 


frfsxo 


KGST 


10 


rnni 


k< l R 


»- 


rnxr. rfach 


KGER 


9 


I.OS AXGFTFS 


KGFJ 


24 




kl'OP 


23 


PASADENA 


_ KALI .... 


1 1 


FITTSBl RG 


KF.C.C .. 


3 


SACRAMENTO 


KXOA 


H 



S f\ HI l<\ IRDINO kK\o 
S i\ DIEGO w U 

\ I Rll 

SAh R tl ii i Kim 

STOCKTOh Ksl\ 

Kll C 



DENVl R 



n i nin 



COLORADO 



KFSi 

kl\l\ 
kl IK 
ki si 



IS 

12 

In 



12 
6 

I 



CONNECTICUT 



\OKII UK WNLR 
si IMFORD WSTt 

ll ll l Kin RY ll ITR 

ll UK) 


1 

2 

\2 
1 


DELAWARE 




WILMINGTON WILM 


■ii 



DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 



ll W//W,TO/V 



WOL 
tt I'lK 
WW DC 



FLORIDA 

ARCADIA WAPG 

CHIPLEY WBi.t 

COCOA WttKO 

CORAL GABLES WVCG 

I) lYTOh I BE I' II tt ROD 

DE LAND WJKs 

DEFRAY BEACH WDBF 

FF.R\ t\l>l\ -t BE U 11 WFBF 

FORT LAUDERDALE WFTL 

FORT PIERCE W AR\ 

WIR I 
GAINESVILLE tt Dl 11 

WGGG 

WRI F 
HOLLYWOOD WGMA 

kl»IMMEE tt Rtt II 

LAKE CITY WDSR 

I. IkFI. 1 XI) WONN 

LIVE OIK WNER 

MIAMI , WGBS 

WMIE 

\ A PL ES WNOG 

SEW SMYRNA BCH. WSBB 
OCAL l W\lop 

WTM< 
ORLANDO WARR 

tt IIOO 

PALATKA tt tt PF 

PANAMA CITY tt Pi F 

PENSACOLA WCOA 

PERRY ttl'K) 

PL I XT CITY tt PI. I 

QUINCY WCMI 

ST. II (.1 STINE ttST\ 

S I \ FORD ttTRR 

STUART WTSl 

TALLAHASSEl ttT\T 

TAMPA tt D il 

WEBK 
TARPON SPRINGS __ WDCL 
l FRO BEACH tt \T\I 

W. PALM REACH WIRK 

W1XTER HAVEN tt SIR 



6 

1 

13 



3 
5 
5 

'-• 
1 
2 

'i 

11 

6 

9 

_% 

17 

3 

_1 



1 
2 
I 

1 

19 

6 
6 

7 
I 

11 
7 
9 
.' 
1 

i> 
1 
8 
S 

12 
2 
8 

'■-■ 
7 

I 

14 

2 



CITV 



{DEL 



CALL LETTE Rtt HOURS 



I \ll RJt l s 

II III \s 

II I.I si | 



BAXLEY 

BRl \su H K 
i URO 

i i>l l Mill s 



i iiKDI 1 1 
i ORNELI I 
( m INGTOti 
DOl Gl Is 
Dl 111 1\ 
I II /l.l K If D 
FORI I ILLEY 
i. UNI SVILLl 

i.Kll 1 1\ 



it l ii. 
ll Dl i 

II Kl i 

it i. n 
It KDIl 
tl II IK 
U MIX. 
U <.K I 
tt It Ik 
WGB I 
U PA \ 
tt MJM 
ll i n\ 
I! l.l s 

WDMC 

It Ml I 
ll Kill: 
ll FPM 
ll Dl \ 
/; i.i. i 
mill 
ll i I II 
ii BGR 
ll I u. 
it I Ki- 
ll M 1/ 
tt Ml. I 
tt I// i. 
tt MKI 
tt I OH 
tt Kit \ 
U si /; 
ill \Q 
tt s\l 
tt I I K 
tt J 11 
tt s) I 
tt K l\ 
tt ttl.s 
ll I I I 
II I. nl 
ll IK\FR ROBINS WRPB 

ll \Y CROSS tt \<l. 

WAY A 
ll I) \ESRORO tt URO 

ttl\DER tt I Mo 



II III kl\sl II I I 

II si I' 

I I i.K I M.I 

MACON 



MADISOh 

Mil. 1. 1 Dl, I I UIF 
MONROl 
M II M 1\ 
PERRY 

01 II M t\ 

KOMI 

s I \ HI K si II 1 I 

SA\ i\\ ill 

stt 1l\.sltOKO 

SYL) IN I A 

THOM isi a 1 1 

iii m\ 
TOCCO l 

I II DOST A 



7 
1 

■ 

10 
21 

\ 
8 

8 

13 
IS 

3 

7 
1 

I 
16 

2 

7 

9 

ll 

12 
3 

J 

7 

1 



14 

20 

• 

9 
3 



ILLINOIS 



Kl I I I I 11 1 1 
i URO 
i HP U.O 



EAST ST. LOl Is 
I i INSTOA 



kl n IMF 
SP IKT I 
i RB I ^ / 



WIRI 


1 


a ■ kro 


1 


tt 1 II 


10 


tt SBl 




ttTMl 


24 


III III 


2 


tt \ Mi- 


'■-• 


tt kl 1 


1 


tt Hi ii 


3 


ktt ID 


t 



INDIANA 



GAR) 



HAMMOND 
INDIAh trolls 

MU HH, IX CITY 
RICHMOND 
sol Til BEND 
TERRF H II TE 



tt(.K) 
Wtt i I 
tt lull 

mr.i 

.ttlM< 
tt kill 
tt H I 
tt ROW 



IOWA 



DES MOINES 

OTTlMtt 1 


Ktt DM 

tt HI/ 


WATERLOO 


K\Ff 



22 
22 
18 

1 
3 

1 
1 



SPONSOR NEGRO ISSl E • 28 SEPTEMBER 195' 



2'> 



KANSAS 


CITY CALL LETTERS 


HOURS 


CITY 


CALL LETTERS 


HOURS 




HOPKINSVILLE .. WKOA 


. .6 


FERRIDAY 


.. KFNV 


. 21 




LEXINGTON WLEX ..... 

MADISONVILLE WFMW 

PINEVILLE —WMLl- 

RADCLIFF ... WSAC ..... 
RICHMOND WEK) 


5 

5 

12 

14 

1 


II IMMOND 

it or ma 


.WFPR .. 
. -KC1L 


4 


COFFEYVILLE KGGF % 


.10 


CONt 0RD1 I KFRM ... 2 


LAFAYETTE 


kl OL 


2 


HVTCHINSOh k II Ilk 11 

LAW HI \ kl II \ 2 


LAKE CHARLES 
1/ ( XSFIELD 


k \OK . 

KLOU 

kl)BC 


.15 
.3 


TOPFk \ II HI \ '•: 


LOUISIANA 

ABBEVILLE XROF 

III XANDRIA KDBS ..... 

KSYL 
BATON ROUGE WIBR ....... 


1 

25 

.....23 

— . 14 


8 


WICHI1 1 k M s 2 


MARKSVII.I.F. 

UIXDF.N 


... ..KAI'B 
. KAPK . 


4 
. . .2 




\in\ROF. 


KLIC ... 


in 


KENTUCKY 

RAL C1TI II UTA 5 

COH MBIA WAIN % 


MORGAN CITY 

NEW IBERIA .. 
NEW ORLEANS 

OPELOUSAS 
RUSTON 


KMLB __ 
k\OE 
...KMRC 
.^...KVIM 
-WJBW . 
WNOE - 
WWEZ 
KSLO 


2 

6 
14 


COVINGTO\ HXII' 12 
WERT, t\D WCPM ..6 


BOGALUSA WHXY ... 

WIKC 


3 
-1 


.5 
1 


FRANKFORT It FKY 3 

rrtN WFUL 10 


CROWT.FY KS1G 
DE RIDDER KDLA 


8 


2 
6 
10 


HARLAN II IILN _...... 1 


EUNICE ...... KEUN . .. 


...... 10 








KRUS 
...... KENT 

| kit kll 
. . KTLD 


24 




SHREVEPORT 

I 1 
TAI.LUJ.AH 


- - % 




B 

V NEGRO 

W RADIO | 

\ STATION 1 

A NfGRO PL/LSF, ?957 | 

YOU MORE FOR 1 
NEGRO HOMES! [ 

30 MONTHS ■ 
30 MONTHS \ 

GROWING | 

5,000 Watts ; 

HEBB; 

vIC METROPOLITAN BALTIMORE 

BALTIMORE 16, MD. 1 

1 
Bentley A. Stecher 
GENERAL MANAGER 

. GILL-PERNA FOR THE FACTS! 


26 
.23 


i WFR 


THIBODAUX . 
WINNFIEI.n 


k TIB 

klCL 


6 

3 


WW LD. 


MARYLAND 

ANNAPOLIS WNA V 


12 


1 BALTIMORE'S^ 


BALTIMORE WBAL 

ii mi 

HAVRE DE GRACE WASA _ 

LEXINGTON PARK WPTX . 

MASSACHUSETTS 

ROSTON WMFX 


12 

15 

3 

2 

14 


I-4J 


NEW BEDFORD WNBH 
SPRINGFIELD ....... WJKO 

MICHIGAN 

ANN ARBOR WHRV . 

WPAG 
BENTON HARBOR ...... WHFB _ 

DETROIT CKI.U 


y 4 

12 

3 
3 




FLINT 


WXYZ 
WAMM 


.16 

21 


r 

■ f GIVES 
I YOUR MONEY IN 


GRAND RAPIDS 
MUSKEGON ... 

PORT HURON 

SAGINAW . 


WBBC .... 
WFDF ... 
If MRP _._ 
..WLAV 
WMUS 
WHLS 
WSC, w 


5 

% 

10 

3 
2 

2 
18 


■ ONgTHE AIR 


MISSISSIPPI 

ABERDEEN ..... 11 MPA 


6 


TOP - RATED 


AMOR) 


.. .W AMY 


.. 20 


BATESVILLE 


.WBLE 


1 




BILOXI 


.. ..WDEB . 


3 


| AND STILL I 

| Soon to Go 


BOONEVILLE 
CANTON 

CENTERVILLE 
CLARKSDALE 
CLEVELAND 
COLUMBIA ...... 


WBIP ... 

WDOB 
WGLC . 
WKDL 
WCLD 
WCJU 


6 

Lfl 

2 

18 




COLUMBUS 


II ACR 


HI 




CORINTH 

GRENADA . 


it cm 


24 


\MMvVi 


WCMA . 
fPNAC 


1 
11 


GULFPORT 


.WGl M 


1 




^^^^UrVj I COVERIh 


HATTIESBIR<; 
HAZLEHIRST 


II BR 11 

iriisv 

II MDC .. 


19 


■ ^5*w 


5 

8 




HOUSTON 


II (PC 


1) 




LAUREL 
LOUISVILLE 


II LAV _ 
II /..si/ 


5 

10 




MERIDIAN 


WMOX 


.15 


\^-^ CALl 


X4TCHEZ .... 


WTOK 

WM1S ... 


14 

8 






NEWTON 
OXFORD 


,WEGA ... 
. WSl II 


6 

5 



30 



SPONSOR NEGRO ISSUE • 28 SEPTEMBER 1957 






CITY 


CALL LET 11 UN 


MOUHS 


I5( iGOl 1 l 
run tin. i nil \ 

PH DIM 
S7 IRKI II II 

ii r/io 
1 ICKSBl RG 


II r\ir 

II IIOI 
If Rl II 

II sso 

II 1 1 O 

wvm 


2 

V 

1 

ID 

8 
6 


it 1) \ESBOR0 

ii 1 SI l'OI\ 1 


it \B0 

it roi; 


i ■ 


MISSOURI 




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CITY 



NEW MEXICO 

CALL II 1 II • "OURS 



ts/lfRY PARK I! UK L> 

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NEW YORK 

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Mil Roi llll II 
Mil YORK 

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ELIZABETH CI!) 

FAIRMONT 


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GRl ENVILLE 
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sol llll R\ n\l s 

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CALL L( I I I IIS HOUHS 
// / 1/' 

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ll i, I < 

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// /// // 
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ll II K) 

ii tin 7 

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II RRF 




Call our rep. STARS NATIONAL INC. (PLaza 8-0555) and learn 
why more National and Local accounts insist on WHAT over all 
other media for the lucrative PHILADELPHIA NEGRO MARKET. 



WHAT 



A M Philadelphia 31, Pa. 
FM TRinity 8-1500 



JSOR NEGRO ISSUE • 28 SEPTEMBER 1957 



31 



CITY CALL LETTERS HOURS 

WHITEVILLE -£f?K - ~?5 

WILLIAMS! H\ I AM 11 

WILMINGTON.. %rrL Q 

WIISON WGTM 9 

VI }\ ST ON SALEM .. W AIR 6 



OH/O 



AKRON 



CH1LLICOTHE 
COLVMBVS .... 



-WADC - 2 

WCUE 1 

WHKK . 1 

-WBEX 8 

...WCOL 12 

WVKO .... . -8 



DAYTON 



GALLIPOLIS — 

HAMILTON 

MIDDLETOWN _ 

SANDUSKY 

SPRINGFIELD 
STEUBENVILLE 

TOLEDO . — 

WARREN 
YOUNGSTOWN .. 



.....3 

2 

3 

% 

1 

1 

_ .3 

AfSTV % 

.WTOD .... 4 

WHHH 5 

WBBW — -2 

WHOT 1 



.......WAV I 

WONE 
.-..WJEH 
......WMOH 

WPFB 

_.-WLEC 
.-WIZE 



OKLAHOMA 

DUNCAN -KRHD -J4 

FREDERICK - - KTA T ... _J4 

GUTHRIE. ---.-.-KWRW . -11 

_ ...KHBG -12 

/crt/L _ -12 



OKMULGEE 

TULSA — 



PENNSYLVANIA 



ALTOONA 

BEAVER FALLS . 

CHESTER 

CONNELLSVILLE 

ERIE 

FARRELL 

HOMESTEAD __ 
JOHNSTOWN 



WVAM 
.WBVP 
WDRF 
WCVl 
WERC 
WFAR 
WAMO 



% 
.2 
18 
..A 
.% 
1 
16 



_^WARD 2 

Philadelphia _ n™, -# 

PITTSBURGH -""^if, v 

SCRANTON . ...WARM x h 

SOUTH CAROLINA 

AIKEN .. WAKJS 1 

ANDERSON . WAIM 3 

WA\S o 

BARNWELL WBAW _7 

BEAUFORT WBtll -.7 

BENNETTSVILLE ^BSC -15 

BISHOPVILLE WAGS 6 

CAMDEN WACA _5 

CHARLESTON WCSC -1 

C//£«^r ^C«£ —4 

COLUMBIA fl^COS -13 

DARLINGTON ^m> 4 

DILLON _ »P0SC 6 

E^stfy - p^ 7 

FLORENCE ^O^S 9 

GREENVILLE WFSC 6 

WFBC 4 

r<?OK 6 

GREENWOOD WCRS ...3 

WGSW .... 10 

GREEK .... WEAB 3 

HARTSVII.il. ......WHSC 3 

LAURENS .. WLBG 9 

MULLINS WJAY 10 

MYRTLE BEACH „_..WMYB ........ 5 

NEWBERRY WKDK .... 12 

ORASGEBl RG WDIX 6 

WTND ... 11 



CITY CALL LETTERS HOURS 

ROCK HILL WRHI 2 

WTYC 7 

SPARTANBURG WJAN 12 

WORD 1 

SUMTER WSSC 13 

UNION _ ..WBCU 4 

WALTERBORO ...WALD 6 



CALL LETTERS HOURS 



TENNESSEE 



CLARKSVILLE 
CLEVELAND ... 
COLUMBIA _ 
DICKSON 



WJZM 

WBAC 

WKRM 

WDKN 



FAYETTEVILLE _ ^..WEKR 

FRANKLIN WAGG 

GALLATIN WHIN 

HUMBOLDT WIRJ 

JOHNSON CITY _. 

KINCSPORT 

KNOXVILLE 



LEWISBURG ... 
McMlNNVlLLE 

MEMPHIS 



WETB _ 

WKIN 6 

WIVK 12 

WKGN 10 

WNOX ft 



.WJJM 

WBMC . 

WMMT 
.KWEM 



MURFREESBORO _ -WGNS 

WMTS 

PARIS WTPR 

RIPLEY ..WTRB 

ROGERSVILLE WRGS 

SPRINGFIELD WDBL 



_3 

.8 
.2 
.6 
_7 
.1 
.3 
.15 
_3 
_8 



TEXAS 

ABILENE KWKC 1 

ATHENS KBUD 1 

ATLANTA KALT 2 

AUSTIN KTXN 20 

BAY CITY -KIOX ._ 5 

BEAUMONT KFDM 1 

KRIC 12 

KTRM 6 

BEEVILLE -.KIBL 1 

BIG SPRING KTXC 9 

BRECKENRIDGE KSTB % 

CARTHAGE KGAS y 2 

CLEVELAND KVLB 6 

COLLEGE STATION ......WTAW 5 

CONROE KMCO 5 

CORPUS CHRISTI KATR _ ...6 

KCCT 7 

KUNO .11 

CORSICANA -..KAND 3 

CROCKETT KIVY 7 

DALLAS KGKO .16 

KSKY 14 

DENISON KDSX 6 

EL CAMPO ...KULP ...3 

FALFURRIAS KPSO 2 

FORT WORTH KCNC 11 

GALVESTON i^.KGBC 23 

KLUF 5 

GONZALES KCTl ...... 1 

GREENVILLE KGVL 7 

HOUSTON KPRC 6 

HUNTSVILLE KSAM _ 3 



JACKSONVILLE KEBE 

JASPER KTXJ 

KILLEEN KLEN 

LUBBOCK KDAV 

LUFKIN KTRE 

MARLIN KMLW 

MARSHALL 

McCAMEY 



..._3 
... 2 
.~ % 

_4 

.1 

..._.4 

KMHT 12 

KCMR 4 



MEXIA KBUS 1 

MIDLAND ..._. KJBC 4 

MONAHANS KVKM % 

MT. PLEASANT KIMP % 

NACOGDOCHES __ „KSFA .....% 

PALESTINE KNET 1 

PASADENA ..... KLVL 21 

POST KRWS _ 1 

SAN ANGELO KTXL 6 



SAN ANTONIO KCOR 

KM AC 

SHERMAN KRRV 

KTAN 

SINTON KANN 

SULPHUR SPRINGS . KSST 

TAYLOR KTAE 

TERREL KTER 

TEXARKANA KTFS 

Tl LI A ..._ _ KTUE 

TYLER KDOK 

KGKB 
KTBB 

VERNON KVWC 

VICTORIA KNAL 

WACO WACO 

WICHITA FALLS KTRN 

VERMONT 

BURLINGTON WJOY 



..... 15 
14 

-% 
--% 

1 

Z 

3 
__ 3 
. . 24 
- - % 
.. .. 3 

-% 
... % 

15 

— M 

1 

2 



y* 



VIRGINIA 



BEDFORD WBLT _ 3 

BLACKSTONE WKLV _ _ 9 

CHARLOTTESVILLE WIN A 5 

CHRISTI AN SBURG ....... WBCR _ _ 3 

WCFV 2 

_ . WCVA Ms 

WBTM __ . . 9 

WDVA 20 

_ WFLO 8 

.-.WYSR 4 

WFTR 2 

...WSVA 1 

..-..WHAP 12 

WHEE T 

WMVA 10 

WSSV 14 

WRAD 20 

.....WRIC 6 

-WLEE 1» 

WMBG % 

WXGI 5 

WRIS 6- 

WROV 26 

WSLS % 

WHLF 7 

..„_WJWS S 

WAFC 3. 

WTON 1 

-.WYVE 2 



CLIFTON FORGE 

CULPEPER 

DANVILLE 

FARMVILLE 

FRANKLIN 

FRONT ROYAL _ 
HARRISONBURG . 

HOPEWELL 

MARTINSVILLE ... 

PETERSBURG 

RADFORD 

RICHLANDS 

RICHMOND 



ROANOKE 



SOUTH BOSTON 
SOUTH HILL __ 
STAUNTON 

WYTHEVILLE .. 



WASHINGTON 

KIRKLAND KNBX 

SEATTLE KTW 



WEST VIRGINIA 



BECKLEY _ 



CHARLESTON 



HUNTINGTON _ 

LOGAN 

MATE WAN _ 

OAK HILL 

WELCH 



WHEELING 



WJLS 

WWNR 

WCHS 

WKNA 

WTIP ... 

WPLH 

WVOW 

WHJC ... 

WO AY . 

WELC . 

WKWK 



-5 



4 

.2 
2 
7 

12 
8 
5 

.% 
8 
3. 
1 



WISCONSIN 






MILWAUKEE 



.WFOX 
WMIL 



8 



32 



SPONSOR NEGRO ISSUE 



28 SEPTEMBER 1957 



1. NEGRO MARKET 

(Continued from pa^e 5 I 

keting specialists for inside work. 
Agencies are lining special Negro mar- 
ket researchers for occasional studies 
even though they're a long wa) from 
BBIK) tin' Huh agenc) specializing 
in this area. 

BBDO in New York has a three-man 
Negro marketing (li\i-i<>n under the 
direction of Clarence Unite | with John 
Procope and Tom Sim-i. Young v\ 
Ruhicam, New iork. bires a free-lance 
specialist. tad Arthur Meyerhofi 
agenc) in Chicago lias long retained 
the services «>f Negro market consult- 
ant Leonard bvan-. 

These people among a few others are 

(lie avant garde of Negro marketing— 
and tlie\ know the odd- which con- 
front them. B) and large, the great 
hulk of advertisers know little about 
Negro radio even though radio .- adver- 
tiser roster is filled with hundreds of 
long-time general product advertisers 
(see li>t elsewhere in this section i. 

W In should an advert i-ei u-e Negro 
media? Can't he sell cornflakes by air- 
ing his announcement generally ? W li\ 

does he need a Negro station or a Ne- 
gro personality to sell a general con- 
Bumption item? 

Reach or coverage doesn't mean sell. 
i- llie wa) Holte of BBDO sums it up. 
Coverage in and of itself, he -av-. 
never sold anything. The use of Negro- 
appeal media heightens the impact of a 
commercial, creates a favorable climate 
for a sale, gets a psychological reaction 
of acceptance from the Negro listener. 
takes advantage of the strong local per- 
SOnalit) selling which thousands of ad- 
vertisers seek today. 

Market basics: Despite the fact that 
white and black are people in common. 
the) each have basic differences. Anal- 
ysis of these differences would occupv 
thousands of pages in either a socio- 
logical or economic tome, hut here are 
a few basics of which a marketer 
should be aware. 

• The segregation between white 
and black has no analogv in the I . S. 
It is not comparable to the differences 
between Catholic and Protestant. Jew 
and Gentile, the Californian and the 
\ ermonter. The line between black 
and white is a color line and this line 
transcends all other differences or like- 
nesses. 

• 1 he Negro, because of this color 
line, is on the defensive — a member of 
a minoritv different from anv other 



minorit) in the counti j . I be • oloi 
line has given him an entirel) different 
■ tilt hi < - and set oi customs, despiti 

Og i aphv . 

• < tne of the biggest mark- of -eg le- 
gation i- in bousing. I vea in North 
era areas the Negro whethei he In- 
rich or poor i- almost -ti » iK con- 
fined to one geographical area and this 
i- uauall) near the central <itv . 

• Because of this physical closeness 
in living, there's less of a gulf in con- 
sumption and living habit- between tin- 
rich and the poor Negro. I be) li\ e 
together, shop at the same Btores, par- 
ticipate in the -ame communit) ai - 
tiv ities. 

• The color barrier prohibits the 

Negro from being as mobile a- he 

might prefer. He ma) have si 2 foi a 
-teak, as Robert P. Leatherwood of 
the Seymour, Leatherwood and Cleve- 
land agenc] in Detroit -avs. but tin-M- 
are few restaurants which would wel- 
come his patronage even at that price. 
He is limited in hi- out-of-home ac- 
tivities so there i- a marked tendencv 
for more in-home entertaining and a 
better quality of product for the home 
— better grade of furnishings, china, 
foods, beverages, clothing. 

• Main of these elements add up to 
a strong sense of lovalty. a need for 
identification with the Negro commu- 
nity even though there is a concurrent 
struggle for acceptance in the non- 
Negro communit) . 

• The best of the Negro radio -ta- 
tions and newspapers encourage this 
search for identification — and thev sell 
their advertisers" products better for 
doing this. They encourage fund rais- 
ing for a new Negro hospital or help 
distribute Salk vaccine in Negro ana-. 
Thev provide buses for handicapped 
Negro children or work to get better 
paving in Negro neighborhoods. 

This tvpe of identification isn't 
available in general media, according 
to one agency marketing man. He 
points out that a general newspaper in 
the South, for example, might well be 
read bv Negroes with resentment. 

"Editoriallv . the paper i- eithei con- 
servative or out-and-out against de- 
segregation or other controversial 
causes involving the Negro. So from 
the minute he picks up the paper, the 
Negro has an unconscious resentment 
against it. Then he turn- to advertis- 
ing surrounded b) White Citizens 
Council new- or new- of some other 
group antagonistic to him. The cli- 
mate is bad — and the bad climate i- 



ti.in-fii red to the -k^ on th 

even though It - a -llln "Hi- loll- i ■ 

I' i ill. 

" I ake In- w ife. She turn- to tin 
homemaking ami societ) section. She'll 
nevei see a pii ture of am ft iend there, 
• •I a report of a Negro wedding, She'll 
never read about a Negro woman's 

club meeting. lei -In-. loo. i- uij.il 
ill cop) to bin produi t V IV. dm t \ 

ha- two stri tut it before it 

-tail-! However, were this newspapei 
ad to be reinfon ed again sub) on- 

-' lOUsl) M itb an > op) on a lo al N. 

station, the two -trike- would be 
eliminated." 

Negro ladio stations have leas area 
loi -iji b c ontrovers) than do the Ne- 
i" print media or the general print 
media. I!v ami Ln ge there's no editoi • 
ializing, no taking of a firm stand. 
\nd Negro radio i- b) far th.- bl- 
and most prosperous "t Negro media. 

Negro media: BBDO ha- tin- run- 
down on Negro media in a inn '.I 

page presentation on the Ne^p. market 

compiled for one of it- biggi si U ■ 
i OUntS. Here ale -ome extra' t-: 

Mewspapers: I be first Negro news- 
paper wa- established in L'.JT and 
(here are now I 79 Nemo papers two 
dailies, 168 weeklies, five semi-weeklies 
and three bi-weeklies. <>nlv three are 
distributed nationally, ["wenty-siz of 

these are \l>< papers and their 1956 

circulation wa- 850,000. 

Magazines: I he pioneei in this area 
i- Johnson Publications in < bi< ago 
which publishes most majoi nation- 
all) distributed magazines i ir« ulated to 

the Negro market: Ebony and Ian. 
monthlies, and Jet. a weekl) pocket- 
sized new- magazine. Ebony i- circu- 
lated primaril) to upper income and 
urban ^ In 1956 it cai ried 

777 pages of advertising in a total of 
1 ,51 1 p. i 

Radio: The number of Negl I idio 

stations varie- vear bv v.-.n although 
the total amount of Negro-appeal pro- 
graming keeps expanding, sponsor's 
Ihr- -■ la-t March showed that 

stations carried Negro-appeal pro. 

ning. ' For detailed anal) sis 
stor) on page I ". ' 

The BBDO report included this 
statement on radio: "Negro-appeal ra- 
dio concentrates on two pro-ram I 

Negro personalities and Negro f"lk 
musii I aid the stations are having 
tremendous success with them. For the 
most part, these audiences are ■ 
easily reached bv other Negro media. 



SPONSOR NEGRO ISSUE • 28 SEPTEMBER 1957 



33 



NJegro radio programing has a greater 
appeal to thi ol lower in- 

come." 

ncluded thi- surve) : "Negro me- 
dia are institution- iu theii respective 
communities avenues for group 

experiences, the) serve as forces of 
soi ial control. These media provide a 
receptive climate foi direct communi- 
i ation and recognition ol Negro con- 
sume! -. 

This 34-page study, incidentally, is 
the shortest the Negro marketing divi- 
sion of llic agencv lias ever submitted 
to the client and account group execu- 
tive-. Mam of them run 200 pages. 

Most ad agencies are inclined to 
Follow the lead set by the clients who 
-how interest in the • Negro market. 
Some observers think the agencies 
should pace these clients in recogniz- 
ing the need for Negro market stud) 
and then making specialized recom- 
mendations if the results just if ) them. 
\ll that Negro media people ask and 
this request is backed up by the Negro 
marketing consultants — is a fair shake 
in being able to present their stories. 
\- it is, the) now think entirely too 
main bin ing executives ignore the 
field altogether — and that includes 



clients and agencies both. 

\\ h) do the) tend to ignore it ? 
\pathv ma\ be one answer, but some 
marketing experts think it's apathy 
caused by ignorance or by a disinterest 
in the entire field of special audiences 
and the special -ales results which the\ 
v ield. 

Consumption patterns: The best 
Negro radio salesmen ne\ er present 
this kind of an argument: "We are 
the only ones who reach Negroes in 
our market!" Bui the) do present this 
type of persuasion : "We reach Negroes 
best and most effectively and if you 
have any reason to reach this market 
\ 011 need us." 

That qualifying phrase is the clinker. 
Many an advertiser doesn't think he 
has reason to reach Negroes apart 
from the general audience. Yet there 
are cases where market research people 
with even superficial delving into Inn- 
ing habits would find that their product 
is a "natural" one for Negro-appeal. 
Take the beverage field as an example. 

Ebony and Jet magazines studied 
consumption and brand preferences of 
liquors, wines and beers in 12 major 
markets, surveying package and drug 



W A f\ T E I) 




BY CLIENTS 
Members of The 





"Jack The Bellboy" 

Notorious audience stealer 



"Daddy Sears" 

O. K Gang Leader 

These Men Are Wanted 
TRANSCRIBED OR ALIVE 

• r** i m * i *' ' t*r ~~~~t^~r ^V"it*-y s^m — "V' ifi J"*»»~iri .H .< J1j- i ~ » 



REWARD 



fc»w 



PAYABLE IN RESULTS 
For more information contact Sheriff Forjoe or any of 
his Deputies— or— call Warden Stan Raymond in Atlanta. 
■^^-■«- ^ , *--- , *- ■^ I *-- ■ , ' ■ 1 ii -*> i f-r -f*r~n i~*tf~rrrvi_r-*if" » ' i jin_ri 



DESCRIPTIONS 



"Jack the Bellboy" . . . always 
strikes between 5:30 & 9:00 
A. M. Uses top records, news 
and weather to muscle his way 
into thousands of homes. 






"Daddy Sears" . . . leader ol the 
gang — armed to the teeth with 
talent — Dangerous between 
4:00&8:00 P.M. Has captured 
a tremendous following and is 
gunning for more. 



KILOCYCLES 



WAOK 



m ^-t 5 



ATLANTA 



WATTS 



stores, bars, delicatessens, grocer) 
-tores, restaurants and private clubs 
in areas predominant!] Negro in com- 
position. Their conclusion: Estimates 
of per capita alcoholic beverage con- 
sumption of the Negro market range 
from two to three times higher than 
white consumer volume; the Negro 
market. 10', of the population, there- 
fore accounts for 20' ', of all alcoholic 
beverages — one bottle in even five. 

An axiom of advertising is that you 
aim for your best prospects — and in 
man) areas the Negro is the best 
prospect. Experts in the Negro market 
want a chance to tell their story so 
advertisers will explore the market for 
its potentials as related to their prod- 
ucts. 

Many advertisers, of course, use 
Negro radio or other Negro-appeal 
media but don't want anyone to know 
it. The normal competition between 
products, particularly in the food, drug 
and beverage field, is sometimes 
heightened by other forces which come 
into play. 

There is a stigma in some quarters 
so that a product identified particularly 
as being accepted by the Negro com- 
munity will be banned from the bu\- 
ing list of some whites for exactly that 
reason. In other areas, where there 
is a highly inflammable situation be- 
cause of public school integration, any 
appeal directed noticeably to the Negro 
population becomes controversial. 

So a lot of advertisers using Negro 
radio won't say so. 

Drugs were the first major product 
group to buy Negro radio en masse. 
They're being followed now by foods, 
beer and cigarettes. Locally, one of 
the biggest surges of interest is found 
among automobile dealers. ( For a list 
of the major national advertisers using 
Negro-appeal radio, see separate list. 
For a rundown on why and how some 
agency people buy Negro-appeal radio, 
see page 6. 1 

Disk jockey selling: The best sales- 
man in Negro radio is, of course, the 
disk jockev. He's a prime mover of 
merchandise and he's the personal 
salesman in nine out of 10 buys for 
national advertisers. Duke magazine, a 
Negro publication which issued its first 
edition in June, estimates that '"500 
Negro disk jockev s are capitalizing on 
a $250 million radio industry." It 
cited the case ol Chicago's Al Benson, 
now earning upwards of $100,000 a 
year. 



34 



SPONSOR NEGRO ISSUE 



28 SEPTEMBER 1957 



BIGGEST 

Share of 




l\ MET. \LIiUSTA 

Richmond & Aiken Counties 

M0\. Tliiuiicjh hill. 
7:00 ,\M Tu H=nil PM 

Hooper. February 1957 



The only independent- 
Negro station in Augusta 
is the TOP AUDIENCE 
STATION in the area ac- 
cording to the latest 
OVER-ALL HOOPER. 

And remember, there 
are 592,000 prosperous 
Negroes in WAUG's 
proven coverage area! 




MAIN STUDIOS 
BON AIR HOTEL 
AUGUSTA, GA. 

William C. Rambcau. Natl Rep. 

Clarke Brown. Atlanta. Ca. Sou. Rep. 

Represented by RAMBEAU 



Hon does the ili-k i"> kej sell ? 

Robei i P. I ■• iiIh-i m I. ad\ ii 1 1 

and hi. ii keting Bpe< ialisl Ii om I Detroit, 
ives pari "I the Bnsw ei i 

"l!li\ linn and exi itemenl are the 
I important tools the) iwe. I 
ployed .•- instruments i" In >i<l the at- 
tention "I theii audiem es, the) also 
enable the record spinnei - Bomew hal 
i" \ mi ilirii im n ii ust rated desires i"i 
pleasure, rhis enthusiasm is important 
bo .in-'- the) pei Foi in foi .1 highl) 
critii .il group "I listeners. I hough 
sympathetii to a point, Negroes quickl) 
desert entertainment which is boring 
or too shorl of professional standards. 
Successful Negro >\\-k jockeys main- 
tain a pair on their Bhows thai can 
be compared to a colorful blow-by- 
blow description b) a nark sports 
announcer. 

"Negro ili-k jockeys are well aware 
thai listeners demand feverish excite- 
ment; they lultill this through dynamic 
deliverj and spirited record selection. 
Tin' fevei is heightened b) the i hyth- 
mic style in which they talk. Com- 
mercials art- read in a ilininu fashion 
thai resembles an explosive < 1 1 um -"I". 
I he sponsor's written appeal is sup- 
plemented with convincing ad lil> re- 
mark- delivered in unique and descrip- 
tive terms thai honor the Negro gift i>f 
creating unusual phrases with unusual 
meanings. 

"Ii nevei ceases to amaze store- 
keepers thai new Negro customers will 
walk up to their counters and proudly 
announce thai they re making a partic- 
ular purchase because the) were ad- 
\ ised I" do 90 b) their favorite ili-k 
jockey. \ml the d.j. hacks away at 
Mill anothei main source "I Negro 
sales resistance: preference foi prestige 
brands and trading 9pots. 

"" \nil Negro d.j.'s have far less 
ground to cover than their white 
counterpai ts (in terms "I merchandis- 
ing and persona] appearances because 
of their geographicall) limited areas 
of mobilit) and li\ in^ ' . ' 

Copy research: \l"-t advertisers pre- 
fer to lei the jocke) work from a cop) 
platform the ke\ copy point- around 
which he builds his n«n hard-selling 
commercial. Rut marketer John Pro- 
i ope "I" BBDI > sa) - this aboul copy 
appeals: Specific points which are to 
be hit in cop) are mosl fre piently 
determined b) a white panel comprised 
of various ethnic groups. 

Ci>l>\. in his opinion and in that of 
main other marketers in or on the 




SPONSOR NEGRO Issi E • 28 SEPTEMBER 1957 







The Sepia Station 

1000 WATTS 600 KC. 

New Orleans 

Mort Silverman— Exec. V. P. & Gen. Mgr. 
Gill-Perna, Inc.— Naf'/. Rep. 



edge of the Negro market, should be 
researched foi Negro appeal or rejec- 
tion and then incorporated into the 
campaign. Many items, of course, re- 
quire no cop) change. But many times 
sales points are omitted which would 
I e persuasive to the Negro, and some 
are used which unsell him while he > 
hearing the commercial. 

The answer: Clarence Holte ad- 
vises that in this situation — as in 
most — education is the answer. 
Agencies and clients need to be edu- 
cated to an awareness of their sales 
potential in the Negro market. Radio 
stations need to learn how to serve 
the Negro community which thev sell, 
how to become an integral part of it. 
Station reps need to know what thex're 
trying to sell, the ways in which these 
markets will fit the problem of the 
advertiser, the facts of life about their 
station's capabilities. 

Too many reps, in the opinion of 
agency men with whom SPONSOR con- 
versed, are exploiting the Negro 
market rather than developing it. They 
undersell their stations because they 
over-sell them, make exaggerated 
claims, give inflated statistics which 
when checked by agency research 
people show an out-and-out misrepre- 
sentation. 

One agency officer who declined to 
be quoted made this statement : "\\ e 
buy a lot of Negro radio for almost 
every product in the house. But we 
know how 7 to use it, which isn't true 
of most agencies, and we know what 
not to let the stations get away with! 
A lot of the radio stations think they're 
on a gravy train. What they don't 
realize is that we can blow T the horn 
on 'em, and a lot of agencies have 
already done it. Sometimes it just isn't 
worth the effort to try to move into 
the Negro market because of the in- 
efficiency and downright ignorance of 
many media people involved. 

"But we know Negro radio sells for 
us — and sells like mad. And as long 
as we are in control, rather than the 
media people themselves, we'll stick 
with it. It's a great market in spite 
of some people in it!" 

At this point, there's no such thing 
as network Negro radio. Leonard 
Evans of Chicago headed the National 
Negro Network three years ago. which 
sold a daytime serial series to Pet Milk 
and to Philip Morris. The 40-station 
network was discontinued after a year 
although Evans still hopes to put it 
back in operation some day. 



There are moves in the direction 
of syndicated Negro-appeal programs 
from time to time, the latest one being 
a series on Outstanding American 
\<\:j.roes by Alan Sands in New York. 
This includes an unlimited number of 
five-minute transcribed shows with 
narrator Maurice Ellis telling the story 
of unusual men and women. Sands 
is packaging these for different audi- 
ences — male appeal shows for a beer 
sponsor; women's appeal for a food 
manufacturer. 

(A detailed analysis of the types of 
programing available on Negro radio 
stations will be found in the story 
starting on page 10.1 ^ 



2. AGENCY ANALYSIS 

{Continued from page 7 i 

which most salesmen don t have. One 
of the biggest determinants in my mind 
is the standing of the Negro-appeal 
station in its own community. Some 
stations have outstanding records of 
cooperation and community service to 
their Negro listeners but others merely 
exploit this group as a potentially lu- 
crative audience. I suspect the Ne- 
groes soon realize which of the two is 
the case, and that they support the first 
type of operation. So would I. were I 
buying a station!" 

Aunt Jemima flour: One of the 

most unusual talents in the Negro com- 
munity is a Chicago spiritual singer. 
Mahalia Jackson. Aunt Jemima Self 
Rising Flour, made by the Quaker 
Oats Co. of Chicago, is sponsoring her 
for a second 26-week cycle on WBEE, 
Chicago. 

Here's what Jack L. Matthews, di- 
rector of media for the Clinton E. 
Frank agency there, has to say about 
the program. "Our experience indi- 
cates this personality has considerable 
influence on Chicago's Negro popula- 
tion and this station seems to be a very 
logical vehicle to directly reach this 
market. The combination of these two 
factors should contribute much to in- 
creasing the sale of the flour among 
the colored people in Chicago." 

Vulinola bleach cream: Another 
Chicago agency executive. Frank H. 
Hakewill. vice president of Roche. \^ il- 
liams ^ Geary, supervises Negro radio 
purchases for Nadinola bleach cream. 
He reports that his agency buys Negro 



;.. 



SPONSOR NEGRO ISSUE 



28 SEPTEMBER 1957 



radio because "I 1 1 1 * - market which 
the) conaidei i- available f"i tin- prod- 
uct thej advertise. 

He adds: "We attempt t<> purchase 
programs that would be high in fe- 
male listeners and therefore we 1 1 \ t>» 
Km in or adjacent i>> pop music 01 
spirituals. Thii is oui preferred t\p<' 
of programing, but we <\<< not con- 
fine ourselves to this. We are rathei 
more concerned with available audi- 
ence and indication "I the female seg- 
ment. 

He think- Negro-appeal radio costs 
are fairl) stable, and that Btations 
carrying tliis type of programing gen- 
erall) seem tc» understand "that tin- ex- 
penditure ha- h> be justified by the 
sales thai are obtained. \ml therefore 
ilic\ have to be kept in line." 

Maine Sardines: Another product 
identified particularl) with Negro 
market consumption is sardines. It - 
a healthful, available and inexpensive 
food which can be served in a varietj 
of wa\ -. 

George Wright Briggs, Jr.. radio 
and television director of BBDO in 
Boston, discusses the use of the me- 
dium In Maine Sardines. 

\\ h\ does he l>u\ Negro-appeal 
radio.-' "For its specialized appeal in 
\ ieu ot the fact that research shows 
the Negro people are heavy pur- 
chasers of our cli